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Transitioning to vegetarianism...


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#201 china cat

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 03:14 AM

I needed this thread- Ive been slipping all over the place and it doesn't feel good at all. Anyway, just wanted to pop in and thank thuggy for the burrito reminder- Abby loves mine and the kids liking my food is the best motivator there is so I know what I'll be doing on Saturday. :grin:

My folks got me a super cool wok for my gas stove for Christmas, so I'm hoping this winter maybe I can finally make a decent stir fry. It's ridiculous the things I have the most difficult time with everyone seems to think is so easy. My sauces are terrible. :lol:

Anyway...is it time to plant yet?

I really want to make a super amazing mole over the winter but Im used to eating it cooked into meat, so I'm still working out the preparation. Maybe served over fried plantains.


my sauces suck too!!!!! so frustrating.

#202 Tim the Beek

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 02:50 PM

My folks got me a super cool wook...

 

 

Nans. I call nans. No such thing...



#203 china cat

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 09:47 PM

https://www.facebook...&type=2



#204 Depends

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 05:36 AM

I made a great root vegetable soup.  Onions,carrots,turnip,parsnip,sweet potato.  With barley.  It is yum.



#205 china cat

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 11:22 PM

Need another reason to buy ham from a local, humane producer?

Earlier this week, Mercy for Animals Canada released 100 hours of grueling, graphic footage from a pig breeding facility at an Arborg, Manitoba farm. And after viewing it, it's likely you'll lose your appetite altogether.

Over the course of 10 weeks, an MFA Canada investigator filmed farm workers slamming piglets into metal poles and concrete floors, as well as cutting off tails and testicles of fully conscious pigs.

Pigs are seen suffering from large open wounds and sores. Some are unable to lie down comfortably or turn around in their small, maggot-filled gestation crates. http://www.takepart.com/article/2012/12/12/reconsider-your-christmas-pig-holiday-season?cmpid=foodinc-fb%3Fcmpid%3Dfoodinc-fb

 

 

horrifying. simply horrifying. nothing other than torture.

 

http://www.mercyfora....ca/pigcruelty/



#206 Ginger Snap

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 03:14 AM

I'm going to see this woman speak in a couple weeks. Really excited.

 

http://en.wikipedia..../Temple_Grandin



#207 Depends

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 05:19 AM

I'm going to see this woman speak in a couple weeks. Really excited.

 

http://en.wikipedia..../Temple_Grandin

where?   I would like to go...



#208 Ginger Snap

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 11:16 PM

Feb 6th at Babson College. I thought it had more to do with animal wellness as that was how the talk was presented to me, but I'm equally interested in this talk on a professional level, as you might be more personally BigDaddy.

 

 

http://www.namimass....-babson-college



#209 Depends

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:23 AM

Feb 6th at Babson College. I thought it had more to do with animal wellness as that was how the talk was presented to me, but I'm equally interested in this talk on a professional level, as you might be more personally BigDaddy.

 

 

http://www.namimass....-babson-college

I will prolly go.  What about you?



#210 Ginger Snap

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:19 AM

I'm thinking yes. :smile:



#211 china cat

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:39 AM

We Raise All Our Beef Humanely On Open Pasture And Then We Hang Them Upside Down And Slash Their Throats
CommentaryOpinion ISSUE 49•04 • Jan 22, 2013
By Hank T. Norman, Owner of Nature's Acres Ranch
90.jpg?9395
 

Consumers today are more conscientious than ever about the choices they make at the supermarket. They want to know that the food they put on the table for their family is all-natural, environmentally friendly, and humane. And that’s why we here at Nature’s Acres Ranch hold ourselves to a higher standard and produce only the finest grass-fed and 100 percent additive-free beef. We guarantee that our cows are ethically raised on sustainably grown pastures before we hang them upside down from a moving conveyor and slice their throats wide open.

 

Our independently owned family farm is committed to one guiding principle: making sure that you, the customer, receive the best-tasting, highest quality beef from cows that are healthy, active, and eventually suspended fully conscious inside a facility thick with hot, blood-choked air and the frantic bellows of dangling, profoundly fearful animals.

 

That’s our pledge to you.

 

continue reading:

 

http://www.theonion....ture-and,30983/

 

(thanks, Jab)



#212 Eco

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 08:39 PM

I made a great root vegetable soup.  Onions,carrots,turnip,parsnip,sweet potato.  With barley.  It is yum.

 

I've just started to learn to cook vegan soups.  Made kale, carrot, celery, leeks and wonton (store bought vegan wontons) last night and in my opinion it was delightful.  At some point I'll learn to make the wontons but they are sooooo cheap at the Belmont supermarket.

 

Also wanted to mention to you that their are options for your love for pizza.  Whole Foods while not cheap by all means serves vegan pizza that is pretty good.  If you venture outside of Boston to Allston google for vegan pizza.  Yards apart are an ALL vegan Asian place, an all vegan pizza place and a vegan ice cream place.  We tried the vegan pizza=excellent even though I don't need fake peperoni in my life and the ice cream place was tasty as well. 

 

Random thoughts cause I'm rather bored

 

Next subject is bread.....hard as fuc to find good vegan bread!  So far I've found some English muffins made in Vermont that are very good and the bread at Belmont.  The stuff at Shaws sort of sucks and Dave's (RI chain) has eggs and or milk in all of their bread.....looks delightful though.

 

Next subject is fake products.  Not sure if I mentioned it here before or not but I'm not feeling love for fake stuff like meatballs, sausage and such.  Cooked up some fake bacon flavored tempuri (sp and not sure if it's the right word) last week and I just don't have the need for bacon, pretty sure my dinner date loved it though.  Speaking of dates, I'm blessed to be dating someone who respects my diet.  I can't imagine dating someone who cooks dead animals on my pans or chops them up on my cutting board.  So far her house has not had any dead animals in it and other than her cheese that she seldom uses I can't think of many not vegan food stuff......oh except her chai that smells great and is a horrible tease. 

 

One more thingy, been putting some thought into at some point raising my own chickens if I can live in a place that allows them.  Really can't see the harm in raising them like pets as I've done in the past and consuming their eggs.  Along the same lines honey from bees that are treated with respect (not harvesting too much of the honey so they can survive for the winter).  Thinking bees hives on a farm might be a safer environment than bee hives in a forest where Winnie The poo can eat them....still debating. Oh and while I'm at it.....raising a cow as a pet.....getting the milk and making cheese.

 

Pardon my ramblings....



#213 Ginger Snap

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:00 PM

I got a bread maker last spring and tried a couple of the vegan recipes and they didn't seem much different to me. Not all bread recipes call for milk and I haven't come across many that call for eggs in my book that it came with. Haven't ventured into the non gluten arena though.

 

So here's a question and Thuggy came to mind, but I'd love to hear from others as well. So we've talked in the past about how I'm not really that interested in faux meat products for various reasons, and for the most part this hasn't changed much. I do put meatless crumbles in my burritoes because the kkids like it that way- I don''t tell them it's not reaally hamburger and they haven't asked so...but I do have a few dishes that I just can't get right- namely bean dishes, especially the cajun ones- and I freaking love cajun. Each time, it's okay...it's just missing something- like a ham hock, smoked turkey leg, hambone, bacon, you name it would make it better. So is there a product I can use that really is a good substitution?



#214 Tim the Beek

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:26 PM

Good bread can be made with flour, oil, salt water and yeast. (or a sourdough culture) :)



#215 Depends

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:27 PM

Eco,

 

Thanks for the vegan pizza update.

 

Funny, there was a vegan pizza place in Nashua about a year ago.  They went belly up, and a regular pizza place opened.

 

I'm not a big fan of the vegan cheese.  I've tried several, and just not feeling the love.  I'll prolly continue to be MOSTLY vegan, and consume pizza at will. It's my diet, I don't need a term to define my diet...   Although, I will make constant choices as to avoid dairy.

 

Eggs and honey are other issues for me. The farm I go to has free range chickens, cruelty free.  The eggs are as fresh as you can get.  I only use about 2 eggs a week.  Prolly will forego eggs entirely soon, but it is not high on my list.

 

So, i the meantime.  I juice a lot.  Eat vegan, mostly. Never have dead (or live) animals. Chia seeds, & flax seeds have become part of my life. Looking into bee pollen also.  TtB have any thoughts on bee pollen?



#216 Tim the Beek

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 11:34 PM

TtB have any thoughts on bee pollen?

 

Not sure what you mean by thoughts, exactly.

 

Some say it's a good source of protein. Others that it's good (if it's locally sourced) for allergies. To my knowledge, there hasn't been any research which has confirmed either.

 

I have a pollen trap I put on my hives once in a while, but I've only used it as a springtime feed supplement for the girls so that they have a leg up before flowers start blooming.

 

From a kindness to animals standpoint, depending on the trap and frequency of use, it can be kinda tough on the workers...



#217 china cat

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 01:30 AM

Tim's been baking bread and we had vegan pizza this past weekend!  oh, wait, we did sprinkle cheese for Jess, huh?

 

Depends: hemp seed too!!!

 

spirulina and wheat grass, even in pill form will add lots of nutrients as well

 

And Tim bought 3 lbs of turmeric :lol:  super healthy, we're putting them in capsules as supplements. 

 

GS, I'm no help on the substitution question :(



#218 Eco

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 02:01 AM

Well said!  Plus terms/titles come with rules and some of them are silly. 

 

 It's my diet, I don't need a term to define my diet...  


#219 ladygingechilla

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 02:02 AM

I love this thread.

 

I'm with ya on the cheese thing Depends. Its just not worth it.  I had high hopes for nutritional yeast to lend a cheeseyness to vegan mac and cheese.  My single attempt was inedible but now that I think about it, it had that fake cheese in it :-/  I will have to try again.

Mmmm nutritional yeast on popcorn :drool:

 

I'm pretty meh. about meat substitutes- too many chemicals and could never taste as good as what they're flavored to be. I'd rather make cauliflower taste nommy with a little maillard reaction :wink:

 

Can someone tell me what is with chia seeds? I've been reading them in recipes all over the place.  New fad food or am I way out of the loop?



#220 Tim the Beek

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 02:05 AM

Fake cheese sucks. Never had one that didn't make food taste worse than the way it would have without adding it.

 

I may have mentioned this already, but we've found that cauliflower puree added to "cheese" soups with some soy milk in them can be quite tasty...



#221 Tim the Beek

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 02:07 AM

Tim's been baking bread and we had vegan pizza this past weekend!  oh, wait, we did sprinkle cheese for Jess, huh?

 

We did, but it woulda been fine without it.

 


And Tim bought 3 lbs of turmeric :lol:  super healthy, we're putting them in capsules as supplements. 

 

3 lbs is a lot of Turmeric. :lol:



#222 Depends

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 03:51 AM

Chia seeds are high in Omega-3s, but the interesting thing about them (other than growing "hair" on ceramic) is that they retain 30X their weight in water. If you put them in water, they gel up.  Keeps you full, 'cause it stays in your belly longer.  There are some theories about them cleansing, but I'm sure no actual tests have been done.

They are very high in fiber, have some protein, and calcium too.  They take on the flavor of whatever you mix them with.   They don't have much taste by themselves.  A slight nutty flavor.
 



#223 ladygingechilla

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:43 AM

Thanks :-) I haven't seen chia seeds in the supermarkets but I'll check my co-op and hippy shop. This morning I managed to remember the peanut butter banana overnight oats in my fridge. Yums!

#224 Depends

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 02:15 PM

They vary in price.  Bob's RedMill is about $11.00/pound.  I found another, organic brand that was about $7.00/pound (can't remember the brand)  (I guess they don't do much for memory)

 

mrtchiapetbox.jpg



#225 mayfly

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 04:30 PM

Chia seeds are high in Omega-3s, but the interesting thing about them (other than growing "hair" on ceramic) is that they retain 30X their weight in water. If you put them in water, they gel up.  Keeps you full, 'cause it stays in your belly longer.  There are some theories about them cleansing, but I'm sure no actual tests have been done.

They are very high in fiber, have some protein, and calcium too.  They take on the flavor of whatever you mix them with.   They don't have much taste by themselves.  A slight nutty flavor.
 

 

 

 

I bought organic ones from Amazon  :bigsmile:



#226 ladygingechilla

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:14 AM

Alrighty... I got a bag of Bob's a week ago. Tomorrow morning I'll try a TBSP in some water (Per the chia thread)

 

Making soup tonight for tomorrow (or whenever I get to it) - roasted butternut squash, onion & potato and kale and lentil with veg. stock.

Really all I want tonight is some baked kale.

Omnomnomnom!



#227 Depends

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:32 AM

Alrighty... I got a bag of Bob's a week ago. Tomorrow morning I'll try a TBSP in some water (Per the chia thread)

 

Making soup tonight for tomorrow (or whenever I get to it) - roasted butternut squash, onion & potato and kale and lentil with veg. stock.

Really all I want tonight is some baked kale.

Omnomnomnom!

Start with a teaspoon.  A single tablespoon will blow up pretty big.  After a few days, work your way up to a tablespoon.

 

You can add them to anything that is liquid.  soups, yogurt....



#228 Jabadoodle

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:31 AM

omnivore.jpg



#229 china cat

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 09:56 PM

482445_379872638787307_1198488222_n.jpg

 

bacon.



#230 china cat

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 09:59 PM

374459_378438412264063_268296385_n.jpg



#231 china cat

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 10:03 PM

31474_367218423386062_987253086_n.png



#232 china cat

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 05:58 PM

HILARIOUS

 

http://www.dailymoti...=6#.UTzJQ1cr5TJ



#233 china cat

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:01 AM

"Significant associations with processed meat intake were observed for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and 'other causes of death'. The results of our analysis support a moderate positive association between processed meat consumption and mortality, in particular due to cardiovascular diseases, but also to cancer."

 

http://www.biomedcen...1741-7015/11/63



#234 china cat

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:03 AM

"For analyses by meat type, cooking method, and doneness preference, positive associations between red processed meat and proximal colon cancer and pan-fried red meat and colorectal cancer were found."

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....les/PMC3584417/



#235 china cat

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:06 AM

"Consumption of red and processed meat (RPM) is a leading contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and high intakes of these foods increase the risks of several leading chronic diseases"

 

http://bmjopen.bmj.c...ent/2/5/e001072

 

http://www.scienceda...20911091658.htm



#236 china cat

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:08 AM

Processed meat 'linked to pancreatic cancer'

By James Gallagher Health reporter, BBC News

 

A link between eating processed meat, such as bacon or sausages, and pancreatic cancer has been suggested by researchers in Sweden.

They said eating an extra 50g of processed meat, approximately one sausage, every day would increase a person's risk by 19%.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...health-16526695



#237 china cat

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:10 AM

Consumption Of Processed Meats Associated With Prostate Cancer

http://www.medicalne...ases/238203.php

 

http://www.plosone.o...al.pone.0027711

 

http://www.medicalne...cles/238297.php



#238 china cat

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:15 AM

http://www.foodnavig...k-Meta-analysis



#239 china cat

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:17 AM

"Fermented sausages, although presumed safe for consumption, sometimes cause serious bacterial infections in humans that may be deadly. Not much is known about why and when this is the case. We tested the hypothesis that residual veterinary antibiotics in meat can disrupt the fermentation process, giving pathogenic bacteria a chance to survive and multiply. We found that six commercially available starter cultures were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, namely, oxytetracycline, penicillin, and erythromycin. In meat, statutorily tolerable levels of oxytetracycline and erythromycin inhibited fermentation performance of three and five of the six starter cultures, respectively. In model sausages, the disruption of meat fermentation enhanced survival of the pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium compared to successful fermentations. Our work reveals an overlooked risk associated with the presence of veterinary drugs in meat."

 

http://mbio.asm.org/...t/3/5/e00190-12

 

http://www.scienceda...20828093244.htm



#240 Eco

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 12:30 PM

Consumption Of Processed Meats Associated With Prostate Cancer

This was actually my main push to switch over to a veggie diet 5-6 years ago.  My father got colon cancer and doing research back then plus knowing his HEAVY meat diet connected the dots for my diet chance.  Cancer in general sucks and for me while I fear cancer in general, I sure the fuc don't want ass cancer.



#241 Eco

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 12:38 PM

On another note....it's a really bad idea at least for me to go off of my diet "just for a week while on vacation"!  Last year, I got an really sick consuming veggies washed in local water while in the Dominican Republic.  This year I opted to eat dead animals and no veggies while I was there.  Oddly enough I enjoyed eating dead animals way too much...um way way too much.  Returning to the states I've "cheated" a few times as well....even a couple of times eating fast food with bacon....  For me, cheating on my diet and more so my beliefs is not much different than cheating in a relationship.....cheating sucks...



#242 Ginger Snap

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:29 PM

I'm looking for a nutrition program to use in my programs- we're currently giving them highly processed, high fat and sugar, meat dependent, with no whole grain or fresh food. I don't know that I can sell a vegetarian diet to my employers, but I'm hoping for at least a Meatless Monday or something. Graduated phase out maybe. lol 



#243 china cat

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 08:59 PM

Flies, Maggots, Rats, and Lots of Poop: What Big Ag Doesn't Want You To See

 

http://www.motherjon...-film-livestock



#244 seany

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 12:54 AM

Hate to break it to you, but you get flies, maggots, and lots of poop on organic farms too ;)  That doesn't mean that I don't think organic isn't better, but it's not necessarily more sanitary. 

 

Here's the same source, MJ, advising you to wash your organic produce: http://www.motherjon...organic-produce

 

Both Big-Ag and organic farmers use manure , which contains E. coli (less so when well-composted to the correct heat and time). Organic farmers actually rely on composte more (from manure, produce scraps, hen waste, other compostables), because it is a natural fertilizer and soil amendment.  The use in Big-Ag varies widely on large scale availability. It's cost-intensive to try to amend dozens of 40 acre plots with composted manure - it's much easier to just spray the field with nutrients.

 

Again, I prefer organic, but these health risks are ubiquitous.  A large part depends on scale. If you have a small back yard garden that you tend and harvest, less so.  Start talking hundreds of acres of organic or conventional, and you're likely to experience some of this regardless of methodology.

 

It's like anything else - you can have a clean McDonalds or a dirty one, same as you can have a clean or dirty locally-owned eatery. I'd rather eat at the locally-owned one, but that doesn't necessarily mean my chance of food-borne illness will be any less by eating there. Hopefully, but it's not always the case.



#245 Tim the Beek

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 12:08 PM

While I don't disagree, the existence of E. coli O157:H7 is likely a direct result of big ag practices. Large concentrations of animals sharing space and getting caked with one another's feces makes the spread of pathogens much more likely, and combining the meat of large numbers of animals into one patty, bowl of chili, etc., makes the spread of illness that much more likely.

Small, local agriculture is not without health risks, much like life. But it seems to me it's a no brainer that it should be engaged in wherever possible...I think, in fact, that it's more important than organic. Ideally I prefer both, but given one or the other, I'll choose small and local.



#246 china cat

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 01:48 PM

Hi Sean

 

There's a lot of other info in the article worth reading (criminalization of undercover investigations that help bring issues of unsanitary conditions and animal cruelty to light, and the article highlights mistreatment of animals)- I just posted the headline. Having said that, I agree - the organic industry is far from perfect (especially large scale organics, I much prefer small scale local producers). I'm pretty sure there was an e-coli outbreak due to packaged organic spinach last year. And "organic" apple/pear orchids use antibiotic spray to keep Blight at bay (while I don't like antibiotics sprayed on my foods, if the alternative is blight killing off an orchard in a matter of days, then it seems appropriate and necessary). 

 

And you are right - it does depend on scale. In regard to meat production, overcrowding of animals seems to be the cause for an increased risk of poisoning from e-coli, salmonella, and other dangerous pathogens, which is a problem within the "organic industrial complex" and conventional CAFOs (both are "big ag")

 

interesting info, highlighting you point. see the article below (from 2010):

 

When medical researchers at the University of Minnesota took more than 1,000 food samples from multiple retail markets, they found evidence of fecal contamination in 69% of the pork and beef and 92% of the poultry samples. Nine out of ten chicken carcasses in the store may be contaminated with fecal matter. And half of the poultry samples were contaminated with the UTI-causing E. coli bacteria.

 

 

KF: Is factory farmed meat more likely to get E. coli out into the market, or is all meat (even free range) carrying that potential?

 

MG: In chickens, these bacteria cause a disease called colibacillosis, now one of the most significant and widespread infectious diseases in the poultry industry due to the way we now raise these animals. Studies have shown infection risk to be directly linked to overcrowding on factory chicken farms. In caged egg-laying hens, the most significant risk factor for flock infection is hen density per cage. Researchers have calculated that affording just a single quart of additional living space to each hen would be associated with a corresponding 33% drop in the risk of colibacillosis outbreak. This is one of the reasons many efforts to improve the lives of farmed animals is critical not only for animal welfare, but for the health of humans and animals alike.

 

but the same article goes on:

 

In terms of other infections like Campylobacter, the most common cause of bacterial food poisoning in the United States, Consumer Reports is publishing an analysis of retail chicken in their January 2010 issue. The majority of store-brought chickens were contaminated with Campylobacter, which can trigger arthritis, heart and blood infections, and a condition called Guillain-Barré syndrome that can leave people permanently disabled and paralyzed. Comparing store brands, 59% of the conventional factory farmed chickens were contaminated, compared to 57% of chickens raised organically. So there might be a marginal difference, but the best strategy may be to avoid meat completely (good reason for this info to be in a go veg thread :). With the virtual elimination of polio, the most common cause of neuromuscular paralysis in the United States now comes from eating chicken.

 

the entire industry is a problem:

 

"There are many industrial practices that contribute to the alarming rates of this disease. Most eggs come from hens confined in battery cages, small barren wire enclosures affording these animals less living space than a single sheet of letter-sized paper for virtually their entire 1-2 year lifespan. Salmonella-contaminated battery cage operations in the United States confine an average of more than 100,000 hens in a single shed. The massive volume of contaminated airborne fecal dust in such a facility rapidly accelerates the spread of infection.

 

Factory farming practices also led to the spread of Salmonella around the world. Just as the feeding of dead animals to live ones triggered the mad cow crisis, this same practice has also been implicated in the global spread of Salmonella. Once egg production wanes, hens may be ground up and rendered into what is called "spent hen meal," and then fed to other hens. More than half of the feed samples for farmed birds containing slaughterplant waste tested by the FDA were found contaminated with Salmonella. CDC researchers have estimated that more than 1,000,000 cases of Salmonella poisoning in Americans can be directly tied to feed containing animal byproducts."

 

http://www.huffingto...h_b_415240.html

 

 

MRSA has become a serious issue are large scale factory farms, environmentally disastrous manure lagoons.... on and on it goes... the entire ag system needs an overhaul.



#247 jnjn

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 02:52 PM

if anyone here is living a more active lifestyle &/or looking to add more protein to their diet you could try this stuff...

 

http://vegasport.com...rmance-protein#

 

i've used the chocolate version myself & it's pretty tasty.  i was drawn to this brand because the ingredient list is fairly simple & it's soy free.  the only issue is that it does have quite a bit of sodium per serving.  brendan brazier, a vegan ironman triathlete, developed this brand of nutritional supplements (they have other products, but i've only used the performance protein so i can't speak for anything else).  he's written a few books too if anyone is interested.  i have the "thrive" cookbook which is full of some pretty good vegan recipes.

 

http://www.amazon.co...brendan brazier



#248 Tim the Beek

Tim the Beek
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Posted 22 March 2013 - 05:03 PM

Thanks, TASB! :funny1:



#249 Depends

Depends
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Posted 22 March 2013 - 05:04 PM

Thanks, TASB! :funny1:

I thought that was webdude.



#250 jnjn

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 05:57 PM

you all suck...& not in the good way! :lol: