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Transitioning to vegetarianism...


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#51 china cat

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 04:08 PM

more reason to reconsider supporting this system. antibiotics and animal feed

http://www.cbsnews.c...in6191530.shtml

#52 china cat

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 04:14 PM

more horrors. how do we justify this? why are we outraged by cruelty to a dog yet participate in the cruelty of other feeling animals? there is no logic to this, only cognitive dissonance.



#53 scarfire

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 01:09 PM

the asian dog meat industry videos might hit a nerve:

human cruelty beyond belief



#54 china cat

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 04:48 PM

Vegetarians have lower risk of cancer?

http://www.veglov.co...-risk-than.html

#55 Jabadoodle

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 05:55 PM

Gotta say -- this thread may be starting to tip the scale for me. I am far, far,
from being a vegetarian - have never even tried to be. But from time to time
the animal cruelty aspect has bothered me. I also think, besides the other
benefits, it would simply encourage/force me to be more intentional in this
area of my life.

Not saying I'm there yet. Not even saying I will be. But I'm doing
research and thinking about it -- which is how I always start. So
y'all keep posting...

#56 Jabadoodle

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 06:44 PM

Not that doing what celebrities do is the reason...but if these
people can do it...Some famous vegetarian or vegan musicians:


 Phil Lesh
 Bonnie Raitt
 Ringo Starr
 Billy Idol
 Richie Havens
 John Lennon
 Eddie Vedder
 Paul McCartney
 Barry White
 Richard Thompson
 BB King
 George Harrison
 Leonard Cohen
 Steve Perry
 Tommy Lee

#57 scarfire

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 06:53 PM

i was in a similar mindset jabadoodle.

i ate meat all my life. in the past few years i ate much less until i was only
eating meat out at social gatherings.

i stopped completely after thanksgiving. it's going very well. i feel great and
am learning about the food options. you do hear a lot of lip form naysayer friends and family who think you're nuts but i don't care anymore.

#58 DancingBearly

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 08:34 PM

:monkey:

i was in a similar mindset jabadoodle.

i ate meat all my life. in the past few years i ate much less until i was only
eating meat out at social gatherings.

i stopped completely after thanksgiving. it's going very well. i feel great and
am learning about the food options. you do hear a lot of lip form naysayer friends and family who think you're nuts but i don't care anymore.


Yup heard it for years that I was crazy for my diet but you just have to keep on keeping on and pay them no mind. Congrats on your new diet.:smile:

#59 Depends

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 08:44 PM

I was a meat eater my whole life. I never met a cheeseburger I didn't love. After reading some of these posts, and some stuff that China Cat posted, adding on to the fact that my brother died from colon cancer, I decided to just stop. I stopped Dec 1, so I'm a little more than 45 days into it. So far so good. I have not heard any complaints from friends/family.

#60 china cat

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 09:37 PM

omg, I am so moved and so excited to read these responses.

compassionate consuming is a very important part of compassionate living

and...

compassionate living leads to a more compassionate world.


one person at a time. :heart:

#61 china cat

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 09:41 PM

I was a meat eater my whole life. I never met a cheeseburger I didn't love. After reading some of these posts, and some stuff that China Cat posted, adding on to the fact that my brother died from colon cancer, I decided to just stop. I stopped Dec 1, so I'm a little more than 45 days into it. So far so good. I have not heard any complaints from friends/family.


Who is this? Malcom? If not, bigdaddymalcom said he's gone veg too!! :Phishfolk:

#62 china cat

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 09:42 PM

I miss my mom's gravy. a lot. and i miss fish.

#63 Depends

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 10:08 PM

Who is this? Malcom? If not, bigdaddymalcom said he's gone veg too!! :Phishfolk:


Yes... This is Malcolm:monkey:

#64 china cat

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 10:12 PM

Other vegetarians:

The Buddha
Da Vinci
Einstein
Aristotle
Billy Jean King
Alissa Milano
Ally Sheedy
Dalai Lama
Daryl Hannah
Deepak Chopra
Dennis Kucinich
Diane Keaton
Dorris Day
Ed Begley
Ed Asner
Emmylou Harris
Emily Dickinson
Erykah Badu (vegan)
Fionna Apple
Gandhi
George Bernard Shaw
Jack Johnson
Harriet Beacher Stowe
JD Salinger
Jeff Beck
Jenny McCarthy
Jenna Jameson
Jiddu krishnamurti
Joan Baez
Joaquin Phoenix (vegan)
Joss Stone
John Tesh
Jared Leto
Kate Winslet
K.D Lang
Kelly Clarkson
Kevin Nealon
Kim Basinger
Leonard Cohen
Leo Tolstoy
Linda Blair (vegan)
Liv Tyler
Franti
Melissa Etheridge
Mike Tyson (vegan)
Moby
Mr. Rogers
Oliver Stone
Peter Gabriel
Prince
R.W. Emerson
Rosa Parks
Samuel Jackson
Sir Isaac Newton
Shania Twain
Voltaire
Weird Al
Woody Harrelson
Briggite Bardot
Billy Idol
Alanis Morissette
Albert Schweitzer
Boy George
Christian Bale
Brad Pitt
Ann Hathaway
Barry White
Alicia Silverstone (vegan)
Bill Clinton
Pam Anderson

#65 china cat

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 10:12 PM

Yes... This is Malcolm:monkey:


:smile:

#66 china cat

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 10:18 PM

You can watch Forks over Knives for 3.99 here. It may give you the health push you need to experiment with veggie-ism

https://www.youtube....ture=mv_e_rel_b

#67 DancingBearly

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 10:51 PM

Thanks China, keep forgetting to watch on Netflix.:plain:

#68 china cat

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 09:31 PM



#69 MeOmYo

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Posted 18 January 2012 - 09:39 PM

factory farms are repulsive. buy from local known sources.

of course this brings on a broader scale, "is it humane to kill animals for food?".

#70 china cat

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 04:49 PM

http://nutritionfact...s-animal-foods/

#71 china cat

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 04:10 AM

http://www.foodmatte...Can_Do_About_It

Preface of the book "Six Arguments for a Greener Diet"

The Western Diet might well be called an all-consuming diet. To keep us all fed our agricultural system consumes enormous quantities of fuel, fertilizers, and pesticides to produce the grains, meat and poultry, and fruits and vegetables that feed a nation. It consumes enormous tracts of land and quantities of water—not only for growing food for people, but also for producing food for livestock. And ultimately it consumes the consumer! How? Diet-related diseases account for hundreds of thousands of premature deaths each year.

Consuming large quantities of animal products has inevitable environmental consequences. Beef cattle typically live out their last several months in huge, densely populated feedlots. The 50,000 cattle that reside in a large feedlot at a given time produce as much manure as a city of several million people. Not surprisingly, they create a stench that undermines the quality of life for everyone who lives or works nearby. Even grazing can be problematic. In some parts of the West, cattle graze on ecologically sensitive land, which can destroy normal vegetation. Industrial-scale hog production relies on pond-sized cesspools (euphemistically called lagoons by agribusiness) of manure. Stench aside, cesspools sometimes break open and pollute local streams and rivers.

A high percentage of the grains and hay grown on our nation’s farms feeds animals, not humans. Producing the vast quantities of corn, soybean meal, alfalfa, and other ingredients of livestock feed consumes vast quantities of natural resources and requires thousands of square miles of land. Much of the Midwest’s grasslands and forests have been replaced by grain farms. In the arid West and Great Plains, large amounts of irrigation water, which might otherwise be used as drinking water or in more productive commercial enterprises, are needed to produce feed grains. Although shifting to grass-fed beef would solve some of the environmental problems, as well as provide leaner meat, one serious problem would remain: Cattle naturally emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

The chemical fertilizers that farmers use to help maximize grain production take a great deal of energy to produce, and they pollute waterways and drinking water. Because of all the fertilizer that washes down the Mississippi River, the Gulf of Mexico has a poorly oxygenated “dead zone” the size of New Jersey. Using chemical pesticides to protect crops from insects and other pests frequently results in those chemicals contaminating drinking water in rural areas, as well as endangering farmworkers and wildlife. The small amounts that we consume when we eat both plant and animal foods are unwelcome, if not demonstrably harmful.

Among the questions this book seeks to answer are “What is the cost to the environment of raising so many food animals?” and “What is the cost to our bodies of eating them?” We also ask “What is the cost to the animals?” If an animal is treated well, can exhibit its natural behaviors, and has a quick and painless death, then killing and eating it is easier to justify. However, most food animals are not so lucky. Hogs’ tails and chickens’ beaks are partially cut off. Egglaying hens are squeezed into small cages. Broiler chickens spend their entire short lives in sheds crammed with tens of thousands of birds, never getting a glimpse of the outdoors or pecking for insects in the ground. Steers are often branded with hot irons, and bulls are castrated without sedatives. Animal welfare activists have documented egregious examples of mistreatment of animals prior to slaughter, with chickens being smashed against walls and cattle having their throats slit and being hung by their legs without first being rendered unconscious.

In this era of global warming, researchers have cited the overall energy and pollution costs of different diets as an important reason to eat less meat. University of Chicago geophysicists Gidon Eshel and Pamela Martin calculate that it takes about 500 calories of fossil-fuel energy inputs to produce 100 calories’ worth of chicken or milk; producing 100 calories’ worth of grain-fed beef requires almost 1,600 calories. But producing 100 calories’ worth of plant foods requires only 50 calories from fossil fuels. In terms of global warming, eating a typical American diet instead of an all-plant diet has a greater impact than driving a Toyota Camry instead of a gas-frugal Toyota Prius. And that difference translates into an annual 430 million tons of carbon dioxide, 6 percent of the nation’s total emissions of greenhouse gases.

Nutrition researchers in Germany have examined the ecological impacts of three kinds of diets: typical Western, low meat, and lacto-ovo vegetarian. Compared to a typical diet, a low-meat diet uses 41 percent less energy and generates 37 percent less carbon dioxide equivalents (greenhouse gases) and 50 percent less sulfur dioxide equivalents (respiratory problems, **** rain). For a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet, the savings are even greater: 54 percent less energy, 52 percent less carbon dioxide equivalents, and 66 percent less sulfur dioxide equivalents.

Eating less meat and dairy products could greatly improve health, the environment, and animal welfare—especially if people replaced some of those foods with vegetables, beans, fruits, nuts, and whole grains (see “Changing Your Own Diet,” p. 143). Most minimally processed plant foods are low in saturated fat and cholesterol and high in vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber, and they are the only source of diverse phytonutrients. Even without cutting back on beef and dairy foods, just shifting the cattle industry away from feedlots and toward leaner grass-fed beef and getting the dairy industry to cut the saturated-fat content of milk would yield big dividends.

While moving in a more vegetarian direction offers many benefits to health and the environment, a more omnivorous option is advocated eloquently by University of California journalism professor Michael Pollan in his recent book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Pollan describes the multiple virtues of small farms that humanely and ecologically raise cattle, pigs, and chickens on pastures and in woodlands and sell their meat, milk, and eggs locally. There’s little room for factory farms, Wal-Marts, or Burger Kings in that vision. Ultimately, what you eat is your choice. Considering how important these matters are, now is the time to start to make healthy choices. Each of us can quietly do our part—in our kitchens, grocery stores, farmers’ markets, and backyard gardens.

To download your free copy of "Six Arguments for a Greener Diet" visit www.cspinet.org/EatingGreen
61Sre

#72 china cat

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 10:25 PM

“I have a very strong feeling that the opposite of love is not hate - it's apathy.”

Leo Buscaglia

“The most important human endeavor is striving for morality in our actions. Our inner balance and even our very existence depend on it. Only morality in our actions can give beauty and dignity to our lives.”

Einstein

“When you have established that one alternative is good and the other is evil, there is no justification for the choice of a mixture. There is no justification ever for choosing any part of what you know to be evil.”

Rand

“There comes a time in the spiritual journey when you start making choices from a very different place. And if a choice lines up so that it supports truth, health, happiness, wisdom and love, it’s the right choice. ”

Arrien

“Never, never be afraid to do what's right, especially if the well-being of a person or animal is at stake. Society's punishments are small compared to the wounds we inflict on our soul when we look the other way.”

MLK

"If one person is unkind to an animal it is considered to be cruelty. Where many people are unkind to animals, especially in the name of commerce, the cruelty is condoned and, once large sums of money are at stake, will be defended to the last by otherwise intelligent people."

~Ruth Harrison, author of Animal Machines


#73 DancingBearly

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 12:02 AM

Just a little note on taste, on "Cupcake wars" the only contestants to win twice was the bakery "Sticky Fingers" which is an all vegan bakery! So the experts preferred the taste of the animal free cupcakes who would have thought that?:clapping:

#74 Erinisme

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 12:35 AM

I eat way less meat now then I ever did. I gave it up for 3 years (health reasons...until we figured out the real underlying health issue).

Now I need to eat meat to help correct the issue (long story...for another time).

That being said, I love meat. I don't love chicken so much...and tend not to eat it often. I rarely order anything meat/poultry related when dining out (except wings..I love wings)

I am very conscious about the meat I purchase to make at home. Only grass fed OG beef with a 'animal treatment' rating of 3+, Same with Chicken it's organic, veg fed, free range (same with eggs as well).

I still don't eat meat every day, maybe 4 times a week...I don't feel bad about it. I praise everyone who chooses to go veggie. Right now it's not a possibility for me, but I will not eat the CRAP that is mass produced.

#75 china cat

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 02:16 AM

Just a little note on taste, on "Cupcake wars" the only contestants to win twice was the bakery "Sticky Fingers" which is an all vegan bakery! So the experts preferred the taste of the animal free cupcakes who would have thought that?:clapping:


wow, i wanna try those because i can't find vegan baked goods that don't taste dry. there's always a vegan offering at the co-op and i try them but so far :undecided: i really don't like any of my soy yogurts either.

I eat way less meat now then I ever did. I gave it up for 3 years (health reasons...until we figured out the real underlying health issue).

Now I need to eat meat to help correct the issue (long story...for another time).

That being said, I love meat. I don't love chicken so much...and tend not to eat it often. I rarely order anything meat/poultry related when dining out (except wings..I love wings)

I am very conscious about the meat I purchase to make at home. Only grass fed OG beef with a 'animal treatment' rating of 3+, Same with Chicken it's organic, veg fed, free range (same with eggs as well).

I still don't eat meat every day, maybe 4 times a week...I don't feel bad about it. I praise everyone who chooses to go veggie. Right now it's not a possibility for me, but I will not eat the CRAP that is mass produced.


conscious consuming. if more people were aware and went this route, we could reduce the amount of cruelty occurring at CAFOs

#76 china cat

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 02:59 AM



#77 scarfire

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 11:52 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2....html?hpt=hp_t1

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A state law mandating "humane treatment" of downed livestock headed for the slaughterhouse was unanimously overturned Monday by the Supreme Court.

At issue was whether federal regulations dealing with inspection of domesticated animals about to be killed, processed, and sold for human consumption preempted -- or nullified -- California Penal Code 599f.

Several justices had earlier noted the good intentions behind the state action, but all now agreed that it went too far into the traditional federal arena.

"The Federal Meat Inspection Act regulates slaughterhouses' handling and treatment of non-ambulatory pigs from the moment of their delivery through the end of the meat production process," wrote Justice Elena Kagan. "California's (law) endeavors to regulate the same thing, at the same time, in the same place -- except by imposing different requirements. The FMIA expressly preempts such a state law."

That state law became effective in 2009, following shocking undercover video released by the Humane Society. Slaughterhouse workers in San Bernardino County outside Los Angeles were shown dragging, prodding and bulldozing weak, "non-ambulatory" cows into slaughter pens. Water from hoses was used on some cattle lying on their sides, to force them to their feet.

Penal Code 599f would require meat processors to immediately remove downed animals and "humanely" euthanize them. And the sale, purchase or shipment of such animals would be criminally prohibited.

The long-standing Federal Meat Inspection Act also requires animals lying down to be removed, but gives discretion to federal inspectors to determine whether the livestock can recover sufficiently and become fit for slaughter and human consumption. That law expressly prohibits any state regulation "in addition to or different from" the federal requirements. It includes cattle, pigs, sheep and goats.

The Supreme Court has long ruled that interstate commerce is under federal jurisdiction, trumping any state efforts to regulate it.

The current case was brought by a meat trade group on behalf of pig farmers in California. The Obama administration sided with pork producers, a move criticized by a number of animal rights groups.

A federal appeals court in San Francisco last year had ruled in favor of the state law, labeling as "hogwash" an earlier judge's decision that favored the industry.

The law's enforcement has been put on hold pending the Supreme Court's decision, now in legal support of the industry.

Animal defenders blasted the high court's ruling, and urged the federal government to step up its enforcement and monitoring of slaughterhouses.

"This is a deeply troubling decision, preventing a wide range of actions by the states to protect animals and consumers from reckless practices by the meat industry, including the mishandling and slaughter of animals too sick or injured to walk," said Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society of the United States. "The fact is, Congress and the USDA have been in the grip of the agribusiness lobby for decades, and that's why our federal animal handling and food safety laws are so anemic. California tried to protect its citizens and the animals at slaughterhouses from acute and extreme abuses, but its effort was cannibalized by the federal government."

Pork producers in their legal brief estimated that about 3% of swine are non-ambulatory when they arrive at the slaughterhouse. Most of the downed beasts, they say, are merely overheated, fatigued or stubborn, and most are soon back on their feet. Animal rights activists challenge that assertion.

The meat industry argued being forced to immediately euthanize all downed animals would hurt its ability to detect and fight one particularly virulent disease: foot-and-mouth, which is highly contagious. The industry says federal inspection is preferred, since pre-slaughter inspections of sick animals are required. The state law would mandate immediate killing and disposal of the lying-down livestock.

California -- backed by animal rights groups -- also contended the two laws were compatible, allowing local conditions to be addressed and ensuring that moral and humane conditions would be part of meat processing rules.

The case is National Meat Association v. Harris (10-224).

#78 china cat

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 06:32 AM

http://skimthat.com/...ing-plant-video

#79 china cat

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 06:35 AM

http://www.cnn.com/2....html?hpt=hp_t1

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A state law mandating "humane treatment" of downed livestock headed for the slaughterhouse was unanimously overturned Monday by the Supreme Court.

At issue was whether federal regulations dealing with inspection of domesticated animals about to be killed, processed, and sold for human consumption preempted -- or nullified -- California Penal Code 599f.

Several justices had earlier noted the good intentions behind the state action, but all now agreed that it went too far into the traditional federal arena.

"The Federal Meat Inspection Act regulates slaughterhouses' handling and treatment of non-ambulatory pigs from the moment of their delivery through the end of the meat production process," wrote Justice Elena Kagan. "California's (law) endeavors to regulate the same thing, at the same time, in the same place -- except by imposing different requirements. The FMIA expressly preempts such a state law."

That state law became effective in 2009, following shocking undercover video released by the Humane Society. Slaughterhouse workers in San Bernardino County outside Los Angeles were shown dragging, prodding and bulldozing weak, "non-ambulatory" cows into slaughter pens. Water from hoses was used on some cattle lying on their sides, to force them to their feet.

Penal Code 599f would require meat processors to immediately remove downed animals and "humanely" euthanize them. And the sale, purchase or shipment of such animals would be criminally prohibited.

The long-standing Federal Meat Inspection Act also requires animals lying down to be removed, but gives discretion to federal inspectors to determine whether the livestock can recover sufficiently and become fit for slaughter and human consumption. That law expressly prohibits any state regulation "in addition to or different from" the federal requirements. It includes cattle, pigs, sheep and goats.

The Supreme Court has long ruled that interstate commerce is under federal jurisdiction, trumping any state efforts to regulate it.

The current case was brought by a meat trade group on behalf of pig farmers in California. The Obama administration sided with pork producers, a move criticized by a number of animal rights groups.

A federal appeals court in San Francisco last year had ruled in favor of the state law, labeling as "hogwash" an earlier judge's decision that favored the industry.

The law's enforcement has been put on hold pending the Supreme Court's decision, now in legal support of the industry.

Animal defenders blasted the high court's ruling, and urged the federal government to step up its enforcement and monitoring of slaughterhouses.

"This is a deeply troubling decision, preventing a wide range of actions by the states to protect animals and consumers from reckless practices by the meat industry, including the mishandling and slaughter of animals too sick or injured to walk," said Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society of the United States. "The fact is, Congress and the USDA have been in the grip of the agribusiness lobby for decades, and that's why our federal animal handling and food safety laws are so anemic. California tried to protect its citizens and the animals at slaughterhouses from acute and extreme abuses, but its effort was cannibalized by the federal government."

Pork producers in their legal brief estimated that about 3% of swine are non-ambulatory when they arrive at the slaughterhouse. Most of the downed beasts, they say, are merely overheated, fatigued or stubborn, and most are soon back on their feet. Animal rights activists challenge that assertion.

The meat industry argued being forced to immediately euthanize all downed animals would hurt its ability to detect and fight one particularly virulent disease: foot-and-mouth, which is highly contagious. The industry says federal inspection is preferred, since pre-slaughter inspections of sick animals are required. The state law would mandate immediate killing and disposal of the lying-down livestock.

California -- backed by animal rights groups -- also contended the two laws were compatible, allowing local conditions to be addressed and ensuring that moral and humane conditions would be part of meat processing rules.

The case is National Meat Association v. Harris (10-224).


yeah, because the federal govt can oversee humane euthanization and treatment of over 9 billion animals a year.

#80 china cat

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 06:42 AM







#81 china cat

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 06:49 AM

please consider what you are supporting. don't purchase suffering. please.



#82 Mama Kel

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 09:28 PM

I eat way less meat now then I ever did. I gave it up for 3 years (health reasons...until we figured out the real underlying health issue).

Now I need to eat meat to help correct the issue (long story...for another time).

That being said, I love meat. I don't love chicken so much...and tend not to eat it often. I rarely order anything meat/poultry related when dining out (except wings..I love wings)

I am very conscious about the meat I purchase to make at home. Only grass fed OG beef with a 'animal treatment' rating of 3+, Same with Chicken it's organic, veg fed, free range (same with eggs as well).

I still don't eat meat every day, maybe 4 times a week...I don't feel bad about it. I praise everyone who chooses to go veggie. Right now it's not a possibility for me, but I will not eat the CRAP that is mass produced.


we were veg for years & still don't eat a lot of meat, but when we do it's local, free range, organic, grass fed etc. I haven't eaten (knowingly) meat that is factory farmed/ massed produced since I stopped being veg. My kids never have. It scares the crap out of me :eek:

#83 scarfire

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 04:32 PM

big dividend payoff already from 2+ months of my meat free diet.

total cholesterol dropped from 225 to 175 with both HDL and LDL at excellent numbers. no talk of cholesetrol medications any more!!. :mrgreen:

#84 china cat

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 02:49 AM

woohoo!!!!:Phishfolk:

if we were meant to eat meat, why are we the only one's who suffer from cholesterol from it? Do carnivores suffer high cholesterol and other negative health effects when they eat other animals? no, really, I'm asking because I'm curious. I don't know the answer.

#85 china cat

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 03:56 PM











#86 china cat

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 04:11 PM



#87 Jabadoodle

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 03:54 PM

Watched Earthlings over the weekend. Also The Future of Food.
Probably will start a "supplemental documentary" thread over in
P&R. The short of it is:


* Ugly atrocities

* Has me considering options

* Would like to know how accurate that is (example -- I've
see a fairly large milking farm what was NOTHING like what
is shown in the film. So that leads to the question: Is this
film accurate or just showing the very worst.

* Does a program like Global Animal Partnership's 5-Step
resolve these issues (to my satisfaction) or not.

Lots to find out and consider.

#88 china cat

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 01:51 PM

compelling, right? hard to argue with the reasoning (and images) provided in earthlings. That doc. had more of an impact on me than most others. I considered using it as my next doc. club choice. It's really difficult to justify the horrific suffering of another being, or to justify man's right to exact it.

speciesism: arguments for and against http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Speciesism

the book Eating Animals might interest you, Gary: http://www.eatinganimals.com/

#89 china cat

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 01:56 PM

* Does a program like Global Animal Partnership's 5-Step
resolve these issues (to my satisfaction) or not.

Lots to find out and consider.



would like to hash this out further. I oscillate between a few perspectives. I'll share with hope that others perspective can settle some of my own contradictions in this area.

will respond this week.

#90 scarfire

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 03:16 PM

there's an interesting piece on bycatch in that book, china cat:

"Imagine being served a plate of sushi. But this plate also holds all of the animals that were killed for your serving of sushi. The plate might have to be five feet across.

The average shrimptrawling operation throws 80 to 90 percent of the sea animals it captures overboard, dead or dying, as bycatch. (Endangered species amount to much of this bycatch.) Shrimp account for only 2 percent of global seafood by weight, but shrimp trawling accounts for 33 percent of global bycatch".

#91 Jabadoodle

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 04:33 PM

the book Eating Animals might interest you, Gary: http://www.eatinganimals.com/



Just read the online blurb about it. Seems like he's done
lots of homework and that it isn't simply a one-sided
view. Already raising interesting questions about the
"selective omnivore" choice.

#92 mayfly

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 07:29 PM

just picked up a moosewood cookbook for myself, can't wait to experiment. If anyone wants to watch Eating - Third Edition DVD I would be happy to send it out as long as it keeps being forwarded. PM me


http://www.amazon.co...n/dp/B001CRQ8K6

#93 Jabadoodle

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 07:55 PM

just picked up a moosewood cookbook for myself, can't wait to experiment. If anyone wants to watch Eating - Third Edition DVD I would be happy to send it out as long as it keeps being forwarded. PM me


http://www.amazon.co...n/dp/B001CRQ8K6


I'd be interested in watching that. You (will) have a PM.

#94 Jabadoodle

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 08:29 PM

By the way: The section about leather was even more horrifying
to me than the food/meat section. Death marches. Skinning a
cow while alive. And it's happening in China where I'm guessing
there are even fewer and laxer controls than in the US.

Horrible.

#95 Tim the Beek

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 01:01 PM

Posted Image

#96 china cat

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 04:26 PM

:plain:

there's an interesting piece on bycatch in that book, china cat:

"Imagine being served a plate of sushi. But this plate also holds all of the animals that were killed for your serving of sushi. The plate might have to be five feet across.

The average shrimptrawling operation throws 80 to 90 percent of the sea animals it captures overboard, dead or dying, as bycatch. (Endangered species amount to much of this bycatch.) Shrimp account for only 2 percent of global seafood by weight, but shrimp trawling accounts for 33 percent of global bycatch".


Yep, the effect of one fish eaten on so many other sea creatures... My brother is a commercial fisherman so its a struggle. I want to support him (he works hard, really hard to make an honest living and to provide for a family of 6)

Just read the online blurb about it. Seems like he's done
lots of homework and that it isn't simply a one-sided
view. Already raising interesting questions about the
"selective omnivore" choice.


That's why you'd really like the book - the author is a reasoned man, who set out to gather information (and woah, what he found)

just picked up a moosewood cookbook for myself, can't wait to experiment. If anyone wants to watch Eating - Third Edition DVD I would be happy to send it out as long as it keeps being forwarded. PM me


http://www.amazon.co...n/dp/B001CRQ8K6


I own this as well. I am happy to send anyone interested: food inc, eating 3rd edition, forks over knives, processed people, or the future of food

if anyone has the milk documentary, i would love to borrow it. http://www.milkdocumentary.com/

By the way: The section about leather was even more horrifying
to me than the food/meat section. Death marches. Skinning a
cow while alive. And it's happening in China where I'm guessing
there are even fewer and laxer controls than in the US.

Horrible.


I have a leather couch. it bother's me greatly. i bought it right around the time i gave up meat. i would have never bought it today and now refuse to buy anything with leather (makes shoe shopping tough). i feel like a hypocrite having the couch but the damage is done--when you know better you do better--my purchases since then don't involve dead cows.

Posted Image


:lol:

#97 china cat

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 06:20 PM



#98 china cat

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 05:29 PM



#99 china cat

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 05:30 PM

OMG. Horrifying.





#100 china cat

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 03:21 PM

http://www.alternet...._cigarettes_do/