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Connecticut Senate passes medical marijuana bill after lengthy debate


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#1 PeaceFrog

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 07:02 PM

http://www.washingto...oy2T_story.html

By Associated Press, Updated: Saturday, May 5, 2:43 AM

HARTFORD, Conn. — A bill legalizing marijuana for medical purposes has passed the Connecticut Senate. The state joins 16 others and the District of Columbia in enacting such legislation.

State senators voted 21-to-13 in favor of the measure early Saturday, after nearly 10 hours of debate dominated by bill opponent Republican Sen. Toni Boucher.

Democratic Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, who has said he supports the measure, is expected to sign the legislation into law.


The bill moves away from the largely criticized precedent set in California, proposing a complex regulated system of cultivation, dispensing and licensing.

The Connecticut bill outlines specific diseases that would be treated under the drug. It requires a recommendation from an individual’s physician and establishes a system of licensing for patients, caregivers and growers.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

© The Washington Post Company

#2 Phinnegan

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:00 PM

It's about frickin' time - I was starting to think that my home state was as ass-backwards as Mississippi....

#3 Joker

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:37 PM

It's not just Mississippi :(



Medical marijuana meets hostility from Obama administration

By Rob Kampia, Published: May 4


Rob Kampia is executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project.


During the 2008 campaign, Barack Obama raised hopes among those who support medical marijuana by pledging to respect state laws on the issue. But his administration has reversed course and massively escalated the federal government’s attacks on medical marijuana businesses, most of which are legal under their states’ laws.

This is perplexing because medical marijuana is far more popular than Obama is. A Washington Post-ABC News poll from January 2010 found that 81 percentof Americans supported legalizing medical marijuana. A CBS News poll from October found that 77 percent of Americans support allowing doctors to prescribe marijuana for serious medical conditions. By contrast, the president’s approval rating last October hovered around 42 percent — and is currently about 47 percent.


The shift has been clear. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. announcedin March 2009 that the Obama administration would end the Bush administration’s practice of raiding medical marijuana providers that violated federal statutes. A memo from the Justice Department later that year said the department would not prioritize prosecutions of individualsacting in compliance with state medical marijuana laws.

Through 2010, that policy seemed to work. California, Colorado, Maine and New Mexico took steps to regulate the distribution of medical marijuana at the state and local levels. Other states had similar plans in the works.
But last year the tide turned. Obama’s Justice Department authorized a series of letters from U.S. attorneys across the country threatening to “vigorously” prosecute individuals acting in compliance with state medical marijuana laws. In some cases the U.S. attorneys suggested that government employees who help regulate their states’ medical marijuana systems could be prosecuted for “facilitating” a crime.


There was more. The IRS cracked down on medical marijuana dispensaries, refusing to allow them to deduct such standard business expenses as rent and payroll. Last September the National Institute on Drug Abuse refused to provide federally grown marijuana to a Food and Drug Administration-approved research protocol seeking to measure the extent to which marijuana helps combat veterans with their post-traumatic stress disorder. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives outlawed gun sales to medical marijuana patients. And federal prosecutors in California announced that they would crack down on dispensaries across the state, saying that they intend to seize the property of landlords who lease space to these businesses that are legal under state law.

Last month Obama clarified his position on medical marijuana, saying on a late-night show that “we’re not going to be legalizing weed . . . anytime soon.” This after he had recently told an interviewer: “I never made a commitment that somehow we were going to give carte blanche to large-scale producers and operators of marijuana — and the reason is, because it’s against federal law. I can’t nullify congressional law.”

Simply put, Obama has become more hostile to medical marijuana patients than any president in U.S. history.

To put Obama’s implosion in perspective, consider what Texas Gov. Rick Perry ® wrote in his 2010 book “Fed Up!”: “When the federal government oversteps its authority, states should tell Washington they will not be complicit in enforcing laws with which they do not agree. Again, the best example is an issue I don’t even agree with — the partial legalization of marijuana. Californians clearly want some level of legalized marijuana, be it for medicinal use or otherwise. The federal government is telling them they cannot. But states are not bound to enforce federal law, and the federal government cannot commandeer state resources and require them to enforce it.”

Perry also wrote, “If you don’t support the death penalty and citizens packing a pistol, don’t come to Texas. If you don’t like medicinal marijuana and gay marriage, don’t move to California.”

The five presidents from Richard Nixon through George H.W. Bush allowed medical marijuana research to proceed unhindered.

The three presidents from Jimmy Carter to George H.W. Bush allowed patients to apply to the federal government for waivers to use medical marijuana legally under federal law.

Obama appears to be to the right of Ron Paul, Gary Johnson, Ronald Reagan and even George W. Bush on this issue. It’s hard to imagine how this helps Obama politically, and it’s easy to imagine how forcing patients to purchase their medicine from an illicit provider instead of a regulated business hurts people who are suffering from cancer, AIDS and multiple sclerosis.



http://www.washingto...GK2T_story.html

#4 Smiles

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 08:57 PM

My state was one of those recieving a letter from the AG saying it would shut down cultivation/distribution if they went forward with plans. Which really, I'm cool with.

RI wanted to license only 3 cultivation/dispensary (compassion club) for the whole state. This would force the producers to exceed the federal 99 plant rule. Also, putting the entire medical supply in the hands of 3 organizations is just stupid. Not only is this a crap ass monopoly, it's a logistical timebomb. One outbreak of spidermites could compromise 1/3 of the states supply at any time. The people who were lined up to run these "compassion" centers also lobbied the state senate to end caregivers and patients rights to cultivate their own, as well as "gifting" of medicine. Luckily, the bill ammendment failed. When I heard these compassion centers weren't gonna happen, I did a little spite dance. :dance:

In response, our governor (along with another gov, NJ maybe?) petitioned the DEA to reschedule cannabis. Good luck with that.

I say the solution is to license, regulate and monitor the cultivation of cannabis at dozens of sites all staying under federal limits. Allow these cultivators to sell only to state licensed dispensaries who will test for potency, pesticide residue and pathogens, package and resell to patients.

We also need to get rid of the worst provision of our law, which forbids outdoor cultivation. Completely insane we can't use the best and free source of light, even if for one season.

#5 PeaceFrog

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 09:39 PM

yeah we already know that Obama is conservative leaning... show me a better alternative.

#6 Eco

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 10:49 PM

One outbreak of spidermites could compromise 1/3 of the states supply at any time.

Plenty of mail order lady bugs are available to cure spider mites heck the nice grow shop over on RT44 keeps them in stock.

On the same topic, RI's plan for 3 compassion centers sucked from the start. The projected price of MMJ from the one that was planned in Providence was higher than street prices! In my opinion it works fine now, patients get affordable MMJ, growers get a donation* for the growing expenses and everyone stays under the feds 99 plant "rule".

#7 Smiles

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 11:01 PM

Plenty of mail order lady bugs are available to cure spider mites heck the nice grow shop over on RT44 keeps them in stock.


Lady bugs might slow an infestation down, but certainly no cure. Large nuumbers of them are required to control spidermites, they aren't nearly as effective as predator mites. I can't imagine how many of them it would take for a large scale grow-op. Certainly not cost effective.

Hopefully they would have had an IPM strategy in place before opening, though I didn't see requirement concerning that in the application papers. I was just using spidermites as an example though. It could be fire, flooding, ass clowns using pesticides inappropriately etc. Too many eggs in three baskets imo

Some patients can't always get affordable meds. And I don't think cultivators should have to donate* there time and effort. They should be paid a fair wage for honest work.

#8 Eco

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 01:39 AM

Smiles, the place I was talking about in Prov was an indoor op using the old RCA (think that is the place if not it is some other record place. If my memory is not failing me, they were looking at $400 ish an ounce which is high but on par for getting illegal goods shipped for the west with tons of mark ups along the way. My point is/was that that type of setup is just like the big pharm companies striking it rich from the people who suffer. 3 companies determining the prices of meds for an entire state instead of the 100's of compassion growers=wrong IMHO.

I'm guessing with a large indoor grow op with controlled air intakes, exhausts, sterilized staff and blah blah blah spider mites or whatever would not be an issue. In reference to fires, floods and acts of God.....yup they happen and that is why it's best to keep the compassion growers.

"Some patients can't always get affordable meds".....hence the compassion in compassion growers! Look on some of the forums and you will see that some people give it away to people that are sick as fuck and don't have enough money for meds. Then again some make a nice profit off of their "donations" while others have deals that leave their bottom line/personal needs in the black ink.

"They should be paid a fair wage for honest work"= can't happen with the current laws. With the limits on the amount of plants per patient, the limits on the amount of meds a patient can have there is no way to beat the system and make a fair wage. If there were not limits on the amount of meds, people could grow monster 1 pound + plants.... I do agree the cultivators in an ideal world should get paid based on their skill level and business skills. The industry has a whole is filled with really talented people that spend a shit ton of hours researching which strains to grow for different patient needs not to mention all of the ever changing growing methods and on and on and on....

#9 Smiles

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 02:06 AM

I think we're mostly in agreement here eco. 3 compassion centers aren't the way to go, the more growers the better, growers should be paid fairly, dispensaries should not be allowed to charge prohibition era prices. I saw that too, I cant believe the state licensed that place. Their reasoning was that high prices would serve to prevent redistribution. Bullshit, it was to line their greedy pockets.

As for obtaining meds, some people don't even have access to the internet. Some people can't grow there own, and don't have any close friends or family to grow for them. There needs to be a place for these people to find meds. Also, the caregiver model lends itself to some of the same eggs-in-one basket problem. Shit happens, and state law only allows 2 caregivers per patient. I'm sure you'll agree more access to affordably priced medicine is a good thing.

As for Spider mites: There is a reason they are called the borg. You can't stop the borg. You WILL be assimilated. They can be stopped, but only with due diligence and a sound IPM strategy.

#10 Smiles

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 02:14 AM

BTW I'm not saying get rid of caregivers, in fact I think they should be able to sell excess to the state licensed dispensaries. Like in colorado. CO has greats meds at really reasonable prices, admitedly due to lot of competition.

#11 Eco

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 02:58 AM

I think we think along the same lines.

"Some people can't grow there own, and don't have any close friends or family to grow for them." I forget where I was reading/watching people trying to help out with this for those without rent issues or health issues that prevent them from growing. Something along the lines of providing stable clones in a large enough planter and grow/bloom nutes and following up along the grow/harvest process. I did a bunch of research in hopes that MA would of made it legal last year or early this year.....I'm now growing hydroponic veggies instead.

I agree about caregivers selling excess and that would cure my issue with compassion centers having complete control of the production. I sort of like the California model where almost anyone can open a compassion center and they buy from growers who can produce high quality, in quantity at a price that is competitive in the market place. A good share of the places are really on top of their profession helping patients with the proper meds for their ailment. Trying to find tinture (sp?) and edibles that are consistent batch to patch or even available elsewhere is a major challenge.

#12 Smiles

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 04:51 AM

http://www.coshocton...ext|Frontpage|s

#13 Eco

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 09:41 PM

"Sen. Rhoda Perry, D-Providence, helped craft the compromise and calls it a conservative, good-faith effort to let the dispensaries operate without the fear of federal intervention." Um a strong change from the state worrying about any state employee involved in the process be arrested by the feds.

"The bill passed 35-3 in the Senate. One of those "no" votes, Sen. Glenford Shibley, said he has doubts about marijuana's medical value" is that the same douche that thinks the world is flat and that Rhode Island is indeed an island?