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#51 gregoir

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 03:47 AM

Cloud Atlas-David Mitchell

#52 hoagie

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 01:53 PM

The Dragons of Eden - Carl Sagan

#53 vinandtonic

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 10:13 PM

I have recently read:

The Bone Bed--Patricia Cornwell
The Panther--Nelson DeMille
The Twelve--Justin Cronin

#54 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 05:23 PM

I just read a bunch of fiction. Mostly murder mysteries.

2 Minute Rule
The Shadows of Power
and a few others that the name escapes me. All OK. Nothing really great.

Right now, I'm settling into a tome Ive been meaning to read for a while:

Conceived in Liberty ~ Murray Rothbard

Synopsis:

http://mises.org/document/3006

The new single-volume edition of Conceived in Liberty is here! After so many years of having to juggle four volumes, the Mises Institute has finally put it altogether in a single, 1,616-page book. This makes it easier to read, and makes clearer just what a contribution this book is to the history of libertarian literature.
There's never been a better time to remember the revolutionary and even libertarian roots of the American founding, and there's no better guide to what this means in the narrative of the Colonial period than Murray Rothbard.
For anyone who thinks of Murray Rothbard as only an economic theorist or political thinker, this giant book is something of a surprise. It is probably his least known treatise. It offers a complete history of the Colonial period of American history, a period lost to students today, who are led to believe American history begins with the US Constitution.
Rothbard's ambition was to shed new light on Colonial history and show that the struggle for human liberty was the heart and soul of this land from its discovery through the culminating event of the American Revolution. These volumes are a tour de force, enough to establish Rothbard as one of the great American historians.
It is a detailed narrative history of the struggle between liberty and power, as we might expect, but it is more. Rothbard offers a third alternative to the conventional interpretive devices. Against those on the right who see the American Revolution as a "conservative" event, and those on the left who want to invoke it as some sort of proto-socialist uprising, Rothbard views this period as a time of accelerating libertarian radicalism. Through this prism, Rothbard illuminates events as never before.
The volumes were brought out in the 1970s, but the odd timing and uneven distribution prevented any kind of large audience. They were beloved only by a few specialists, and sought after by many, thanks to their outstanding reputation. The Mises Institute is pleased to be the publisher of this integrated book.
This single volume covers the discovery of the Americas and the colonies in the 17th century, the period of "salutary neglect" in the first half of the 18th century, the advance to revolution, from 1760-1775 and the political, military, and ideological history of the revolution and after.


The link provides a PDF for those who may want to read it for free online (or print out). This 4 volume tome is going to take soem tiem to get through, but I'll be cross checking information to see where potential conflicts in information may occur between mainstream and revisionist historians.

#55 Tim the Beek

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 11:43 AM

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle - Barbara Kingsolver
and a bunch of other stuff.

#56 gregoir

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 02:50 AM

Ready Player One-Ernest Cline so nerdy, so funny so awesome :pimp:

#57 lostsailor17

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 03:49 PM

The new Tom Wolfe book, Back To Blood. I've read most of Wolfe's work and so far I'm finding this one very entertaining. To me, his eye for group behavior is spot on and always enlightening. The book's plot (which is good) is almost secondary the way it weaves itself between race relations in Miami. Similar to Bonfire Of The Vanities, but with New York's black community supplanted with the Cubans. Anyways, I recommend the book.

#58 megmyster

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 07:59 PM

Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind - suzuki
I pick this up many moons ago..and I'm just getting back to it! :-)

#59 gregoir

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 05:56 AM

I just finished the memoir Stories for Boys by Gregory Martin. I thought it was fabulous. It's about love, hate, anger, fatherhood and life in general. Just awesome.

http://gregorymartin...ories-for-boys/

#60 sums

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 05:27 PM

it's hard not to hate you by valerie frankle. funny stuff!

i also started the girl with the dragon tattoo.

#61 TEO

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 12:35 AM

Behold a Pale Horse by William Cooper

 

Bill Cooper, former United States Naval Intelligence Briefing Team member, reveals information that remains hidden from the public eye. This information has been kept in Top Secret government files since the 1940s. His audiences hear the truth unfold as he writes about the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the war on drugs, the Secret Government and UFOs.

Bill is a lucid, rational and powerful speaker who intent is to inform and to empower his audience. Standing room only is normal. His presentation and information transcend partisan affiliations as he clearly addresses issues in a way that has a striking impact on listeners of all backgrounds and interests. He has spoken to many groups throughout the United States and has appeared regularly on many radio talk shows and on television.

In 1988 Bill decided to "talk" due to events then taking place worldwide, events which he had seen plans for back in the early '70s. Since Bill has been "talking," he has correctly predicted the lowering of the Iron Curtain, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the invasion of Panama. All Bill's predictions were on record well before the events occurred. Bill is not a psychic. His information comes from Top Secret documents that he read while with the Intelligence Briefing Team and from over 17 years of thorough research. 

"Bill Cooper is the world's leading expert on UFOs." — Billy Goodman, KVEG, Las Vegas. "The onlt man in America who has all the pieces to the puzzle that has troubled so many for so long." — Anthony Hilder, Radio Free America

"William Cooper may be one of America's greatest heros, and this story may be the biggest story in the history of the world." — Mills Crenshaw, KTALK, Salt Lake City.

"Like it or not, everything is changing. The result will be the most wonderful experience in the history of man or the most horrible enslavement that you can imagine. Be active or abdicate, the future is in your hands." — William Cooper, October 24, 1989.



#62 TEO

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 02:27 PM

The 4-Hour Workweek, Expanded and Updated: Expanded and Updated, With Over 100 New Pages of Cutting-Edge Content... by Timothy Ferriss 

#63 gregoir

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 02:35 PM

I just finished The 5th Wave which was a pretty good Alien thriller.  I am looking forward to the next book in the series.

 

currently reading Secret Historian The Life and Times of Samuel Stewart: Professor, Tattoo Artist and Sexual Renegade.  interesting so far but I hope it gets a bit juicier.  kind of tame for having sexual renegade in the title.  



#64 longstrangetrip

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 05:11 AM

The Old Man and the Sea - Ernest Hemingway

The Autobiography of Malcolm X 

1984 - George Orwell

Notes from a Small Island - Bill Bryson

What color is your parachute? - Richard Nelson Bolles



#65 holysmokes

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 12:45 PM

Thoreau and Emerson



#66 hippieskichick

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:14 PM

Book 7 of the Dark Tower series. 

 

A re-read must every few years :)



#67 TEO

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:55 PM

The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous - Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith



#68 TEO

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 04:02 PM

Inner Paths to Outer Space: Journeys to Alien Worlds through Psychedelics and Other Spiritual Technologies - Rick Strassman Md

 

An investigation into experiences of other realms of existence and contact with otherworldly beings 

• Examines how contact with alien life-forms can be obtained through the “inner space” dimensions of our minds 

• Presents evidence that other worlds experienced through consciousness-altering technologies are often as real as those perceived with our five senses

• Correlates science fiction’s imaginal realms with psychedelic research 

For thousands of years, voyagers of inner space--spiritual seekers, shamans, and psychoactive drug users--have returned from their inner imaginal travels reporting encounters with alien intelligences. Inner Paths to Outer Space presents an innovative examination of how we can reach these other dimensions of existence and contact otherworldly beings. Based on their more than 60 combined years of research into the function of the brain, the authors reveal how psychoactive substances such as DMT allow the brain to bypass our five basic senses to unlock a multidimensional realm of existence where otherworldly communication occurs. They contend that our centuries-old search for alien life-forms has been misdirected and that the alien worlds reflected in visionary science fiction actually mirror the inner space world of our minds. The authors show that these “alien” worlds encountered through altered states of human awareness, either through the use of psychedelics or other methods, possess a sense of reality as great as, or greater than, those of the ordinary awareness perceived by our five senses.



#69 TEO

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 12:30 AM

How Music Works - David Byrne

 

How Music Works is David Byrne’s remarkable and buoyant celebration of a subject he has spent a lifetime thinking about. In it he explores how profoundly music is shaped by its time and place, and he explains how the advent of recording technology in the twentieth century forever changed our relationship to playing, performing, and listening to music.


Acting as historian and anthropologist, raconteur and social scientist, he searches for patterns—and shows how those patterns have affected his own work over the years with Talking Heads and his many collaborators, from Brian Eno to Caetano Veloso. Byrne sees music as part of a larger, almost Darwinian pattern of adaptations and responses to its cultural and physical context. His range is panoptic, taking us from Wagnerian opera houses to African villages, from his earliest high school reel-to-reel recordings to his latest work in a home music studio (and all the big studios in between).

Touching on the joy, the physics, and even the business of making music, How Music Works is a brainy, irresistible adventure and an impassioned argument about music’s liberating, life-affirming power.



#70 Karen

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 01:08 AM

Outlander



#71 hippieskichick

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 10:14 AM

Steve Jobs



#72 Tim the Beek

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 02:45 PM

Vonnegut's Player Piano.

Have read a few of his novels in the past, but am just getting going on the project of reading them all in the order in which they were written/published.



#73 JBetty

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 02:59 PM

Tim - You might be interested in this.

http://www.vonnegutl...r-cat’s-cradle/

 

 

I really like Vonnegut's books and have read most of them.

Interestingly enough, I have never read Slaughterhouse-Five, probably his most well known book.   :dunno:

Maybe it's time to go to the library.



#74 Tim the Beek

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 06:31 PM

Tim - You might be interested in this.

http://www.vonnegutl...r-cat’s-cradle/

 

 

I really like Vonnegut's books and have read most of them.

Interestingly enough, I have never read Slaughterhouse-Five, probably his most well known book.   :dunno:

Maybe it's time to go to the library.


Just seeing this now...thanks!!!



#75 Jabadoodle

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 07:32 PM

Behold a Pale Horse by William Cooper

 

Bill Cooper, former United States Naval Intelligence Briefing Team member, reveals information that remains hidden from the public eye. This information has been kept in Top Secret government files since the 1940s. His audiences hear the truth unfold as he writes about the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the war on drugs, the Secret Government and UFOs.

 

 

How was that? Looks interesting.



#76 Erinisme

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 07:57 PM

Robert Jordan's series the Wheel of time...I'm on book three Dragon Reborn...I'm hooked!



#77 TEO

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:45 AM

How was that? Looks interesting.

 

 

Interesting information, an easy read.  Wouldn't call it unbiased.  Glad I read it.



#78 TEO

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:48 AM

Jabadoodle I read this one previously and found it most interesting.

 

Propaganda - Edward Bernays

 

“Bernays’ honest and practical manual provides much insight into some of the most powerful and influential institutions of contemporary industrial state capitalist democracies.”—Noam Chomsky

 

“The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society. Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country.”—Edward Bernays, Propaganda

 

A seminal and controversial figure in the history of political thought and public relations, Edward Bernays (1891–1995), pioneered the scientific technique of shaping and manipulating public opinion, which he famously dubbed “engineering of consent.” During World War I, he was an integral part of the U.S. Committee on Public Information (CPI), a powerful propaganda apparatus that was mobilized to package, advertise and sell the war to the American people as one that would “Make the World Safe for Democracy.” The CPI would become the blueprint in which marketing strategies for future wars would be based upon.

 

Bernays applied the techniques he had learned in the CPI and, incorporating some of the ideas of Walter Lipmann, became an outspoken proponent of propaganda as a tool for democratic and corporate manipulation of the population. His 1928 bombshell Propaganda lays out his eerily prescient vision for using propaganda to regiment the collective mind in a variety of areas, including government, politics, art, science and education. To read this book today is to frightfully comprehend what our contemporary institutions of government and business have become in regards to organized manipulation of the masses.



#79 Jabadoodle

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 12:54 PM

Jabadoodle I read this one previously and found it most interesting.

 

Propaganda - Edward Bernays

 


Interesting. I put it in the bin.



#80 helen back

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 11:40 PM

Tell The Wolves I'm Home - Carol Rifka Brunt

#81 Karen

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:53 AM

Finished Outlander last week and moved immediately to the 2nd book in the series, Dragonfly in the Amber.  



#82 TEO

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 02:00 PM

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

 

Paulo Coelho’s masterpiece tells the magical story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure as extravagant as any ever found.

 
The story of the treasures Santiago finds along the way teaches us, as only a few stories can, about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, learning to read the omens strewn along life’s path, and, above all, following our dreams.
 
From Publishers Weekly
Brazilian writer Coelho has published five titles in 45 languages in 120 countries, and has sold 23 million books. It's easy to see why. This charming, simple and well-written allegory tells of a boy, Santiago, who has the imagination and courage to follow his "Personal Legend." Santiago finds fairy godfathers at many turns who help him learn to keep up his courage, and to read omens and his own heart. The book's inspirational message follow your heart and do your own thing is oblique enough, to allow readers to interpret it in any way they choose, with whatever degree and form of spirituality one adheres to: "To realize one's destiny is a person's only obligation." But apparently only men need apply; a woman's destiny is to wait for her hero to find his treasure and return home to her. The real treasure here is Jeremy Irons. His intriguing, subtle and powerful performance carries us along on the boy's adventures, into his confusions and insights, through discussions with kings and animals, through the desert and the sun and even through the philosophical passages. Based on the Harper San Francisco hardcover.


#83 Feck

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 06:37 PM

i just finished re reading  And the Hippos Boiled in their Tanks by  Burroughs + Kerouac, ahead of the movie release (10/18 Kill Your Darlings) and was given/finished The Terrible Hours by Pete Maas which gave me a much better perspecite on the dangers my Dad faced during his time in the navy =  1/3 of all the US subs lost to date were due to mechanical issues.

 

next up, you can't always get what you want which i picked up at the vibes merch tent this year. 



#84 holysmokes

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 03:22 PM

Reading but not fully comprehending, unfortunately...

 

Theurgia or The Egyptian Mysteries By Iamblichos

Reply of Abammon, the Teacher to The Letter of Porphyry to Anebo together with Solutions of the Questions Therein Contained


Translated from the Greek by ALEXANDER WILDER, M.D. F.A.S.

 

http://hermetic.com/...s/theurgia.html



#85 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 03:27 PM

The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War (Politically Incorrect Guides)
Crocker III, H. W.

#86 namaste

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 03:02 PM

Martini's "Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology"

let me tell you, rich stuff :lol:

deep into that one right now.  also, Mind over medicine, How to heal yourself and Still Alice a very interesting read on alzheimer's ...mainly on the nursing school track right now. :)

 

TEO, Paulo Coelho is one of my all time fav authors!  



#87 TEO

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 05:14 PM

I am very much liking The Alchemist, the first Paulo Coelho book I have read.

 

namaste, do you have suggestions for others?



#88 namaste

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Posted 23 November 2013 - 03:35 PM

Love The Pilgrimage, and The Fifth Mountain.  Warrior of the Light is meant to accompany The Alchemist, and is excellent in itself.  Veronica decides to Die is as you might guess a bit dark, but worthy.  Just purchased Aleph, so don't know about that one yet.  He also has a "beyond the alchemist"  which I may check out.  Enjoy!



#89 TEO

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 02:48 PM

Thank you for the recommendations.



#90 TEO

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 01:58 PM

The Tibetan Book of the Dead



#91 holysmokes

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:13 PM

I don't think i ever read the Tibetan Book Of The Dead, but I did watch this exceptional video on the same subject.



#92 Lemireacle

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 04:07 PM

Currently reading...

 

Elizabeth Street by Laurie Fabiano (a relative in Liz's extended family)

 

Wonderful Tonight: George Harrison, Eric Clapton, and Me by Pattie Boyd



#93 Roasted and Toasted

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 01:13 PM

Miracles and Massacres by Glenn Beck

(don't hate, I am a fan of his written work, but his philosophy..................not so much)



#94 holysmokes

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 05:11 PM

The Corpus Hermeticum translated by G.R.S. Mead with introduction and notes by John Michael Greer

http://hermetic.com/texts/hermetica/



#95 JBetty

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:02 PM

Hotel - Alex Haley

 

and

 

Owsley And Me - Rhoney Gissen Stanley



#96 sums

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 04:31 PM

don't have much time to read these days but i loved, loved, loved neil gaimans' new book: the ocean at the end of the lane. quick read.

got about 1/2 way through: orange is the new black 

when amy tan's new book came out!

 

the valley of amazement 

 

she is one of my all time faves



#97 JBetty

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 04:36 PM

Amy Tan   :jamguy:



#98 TEO

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 10:29 PM

Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time - Marcus J. Borg
 
Of the many recent books on the historical Jesus, none has explored what the latest biblical scholarship means for personal faith. Now, in Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time, Marcus Borg addresses the yearnings of those who want a fully contemporary faith that welcomes rather than oppresses our critical intelligence and openness to the best of historical scholarship. Borg shows how a rigorous examination of historical findings can lead to a new faith in Christ, one that is critical and, at the same time, sustaining.

 

"Believing in Jesus does not mean believing doctrines about him," Borg writes. "Rather, it means to give one's heart, one's self at its deepest level, to . . . the living Lord."

Drawing on his own journey from a naive, unquestioning belief in Christ through collegiate skepticism to a mature and contemporary Christian faith, Borg illustrates how an understanding of the historical Jesus can actually lead to a more authentic Christian life—one not rooted in creeds or dogma, but in a life of spiritual challenge, compassion, and community.

 

In straightforward, accessible prose, Borg looks at the major findings of modern Jesus scholarship from the perspective of faith, bringing alive the many levels of Jesus' character: spirit person, teacher of alternative wisdom, social prophet, and movement founder. He also reexamines the major stories of the Old Testament vital to an authentic understanding of Jesus, showing how an enriched understanding of these stories can uncover new truths and new pathways to faith.

 

For questioning believers, doubters, and reluctant unbelievers alike, Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time frees our understanding of Jesus' life and message from popular misconceptions and outlines the way to a sound and contemporary faith: "For ultimately, Jesus is not simply a figure of the past, but a figure of the present. Meeting that Jesus—the living one who comes to us even now—will be like meeting Jesus again for the first time."



#99 holysmokes

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 04:21 PM

GOD-MAN 
THE WORD MADE FLESH

http://archive.org/s...rerich_djvu.txt



#100 Jersey Thug

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 01:20 PM

recent bedtime story reading (suitable for adults or children):   Wonder by RJ Palacio (loved it)   Overview

I won't describe what I look like. Whatever you're thinking, it's probably worse.

August Pullman was born with a facial difference that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid—but his new classmates can’t get past Auggie’s extraordinary face. WONDER, now a #1 New York Times bestseller and included on the Texas Bluebonnet Award master list, begins from Auggie’s point of view, but soon switches to include his classmates, his sister, her boyfriend, and others. These perspectives converge in a portrait of one community’s struggle with empathy, compassion, and acceptance.

"Wonder is the best kids' book of the year," said Emily Bazelon, senior editor at Slate.com and author of Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering the Power of Character and Empathy. In a world where bullying among young people is an epidemic, this is a refreshing new narrative full of heart and hope. R.J. Palacio has called her debut novel “a meditation on kindness” —indeed, every reader will come away with a greater appreciation for the simple courage of friendship. Auggie is a hero to root for, a diamond in the rough who proves that you can’t blend in when you were born to stand out.

and

 

The Wild Things by Dave Eggers (loved it, of course!  Eggers wrote the screenplay for the movie Where the Wild Things Are, which Maurice Sendak loved so much, he asked Eggers to novelize the story. fantastic!)

 

 

Overview
Max is a rambunctious eight-year-old whose world is changing around him: His father is absent, his mother is increasingly distracted, and his teenage sister has outgrown  him. Sad and angry, Max dons his wolf suit and makes terrible, ruinous mischief, flooding his sister’s room and driving his mother half-crazy. Convinced his family doesn’t want him anymore, Max flees home, finds a boat and sails away. Arriving on an island, he meets strange and giant creatures who rage and break things,  who trample and scream. These beasts do everything Max feels inside, and so, Max appoints himself their king. Here, on a magnificent adventure with these funny and complex monsters, Max can be the wildest thing of all.
 
In this visionary adaptation of Maurice Sendak's classic work, Dave Eggers brings an imaginary world vividly to life, telling the story of a lonely boy navigating the emotional journey away from boyhood.
 
and last night we started...
 
Flush by Carl Hiasaen 
 
Overview

Bestselling novelist Carl Hiaasen is back with another hysterical mystery adventure for young readers, set in the Florida Keys.
 
Noah's dad has a little problem with anger control. He tried to stop the Coral Queen casino boat's illegal dumping . . . by sinking the boat. But his bold protest fizzles: within days the casino is back in business, and Noah's dad is behind bars and out of action.
 
Now Noah is determined to succeed where his father failed. But even though pumping raw sewage into the waters of the Florida Keys is both gross and against the law, turns out it's near impossible to catch the flusher—especially when he's already bamboozled the prosecutors, the local press, and even the Coast Guard.

 

and I also just started The Kitchen God's Wife by Amy Tan