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Homeade bread... Any tips? Good recipes?


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#1 nikkiblue

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 04:23 AM

I'm thinking of trying to make bread. I've never done it, pretty much because it seems like a lot of work. We don't have a stand mixer (yet) but, heck... its not like they had one in "the old days' either.

I don't have a brick/stone thingy either, so It would have to be on a baking sheet.

I'm researching recipes... Does anyone have a good one or tips for this?

#2 seany

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 05:28 AM

Best tip is that you need a good warm place to let dough rise at this time of year. Warm, but not oven warm (it'll dry out).

Proof your yeast. Make sure you add the sugar to the dough recipe so the yeast has an easy food source to make the dough rise. You can't starve the yeast.

I can't say I've made tons of regular bread - just naan and sourdoughs. Sourdoughs are a lot of work. Naan is easy. same basic rules above apply though.

#3 crujonez

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 01:26 PM

this is the best

http://gatheringofth...ight=beer bread

#4 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 01:33 PM

I make a killer whole-wheat olive & walnut bread - my best tip is to make sure you humidify your oven. Place a metal pan in the bottom and have it there while you pre-heat the oven. When you put the bread in to bake, fill the pan with water and close the door quickly to trap the steam in there. Oh, also be aware that whole-wheat breads have to be a 2:1 ration of all-purpose flour and whole wheat flour to ensure that you get a nice light bread rather than a heavy inedible brick.

#5 JBetty

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 03:20 PM

Make sure the water isn't too hot or you'll kill the yeast.

#6 nikkiblue

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Posted 20 December 2011 - 04:35 AM

YAY! glad I have folks who have experience with this...

Proof your yeast.


what does that mean? I was seeing that term while browsing the recipes and have been meaning to look it up. Is it simply the term for dissolving the yeast in water?

#7 nikkiblue

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Posted 20 December 2011 - 04:36 AM

I make a killer whole-wheat olive & walnut bread - my best tip is to make sure you humidify your oven. Place a metal pan in the bottom and have it there while you pre-heat the oven. When you put the bread in to bake, fill the pan with water and close the door quickly to trap the steam in there. Oh, also be aware that whole-wheat breads have to be a 2:1 ration of all-purpose flour and whole wheat flour to ensure that you get a nice light bread rather than a heavy inedible brick.


I saw the recommended metal pan trick too. I think it said that it makes the crust crispy?

#8 seany

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Posted 20 December 2011 - 04:49 AM

YAY! glad I have folks who have experience with this...



what does that mean? I was seeing that term while browsing the recipes and have been meaning to look it up. Is it simply the term for dissolving the yeast in water?


yes, though it's more than just dissolving it in water. It needs to be warm water, but not hot. Add a dash of sugar to get them going and let it sit for 10 min before adding to the rest of the recipe. It should be nice and frothy by then. 1/4 cup of warm water to 1 pkg of yeast. Just subtract that water amount from whatever is called for in the recipe :smile:

#9 Tim the Beek

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Posted 20 December 2011 - 05:08 PM

Learning to work with sourdough right now...both a culture I purchased, and one I'm trying to culture "wild." It's a somewhat different world than working with pure commercial yeast. If'n I come up with successes, I'll post about them.

#10 sure-ur-rightdancer

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Posted 20 December 2011 - 07:01 PM

I use a thermometer to make sure the water temp is right when I do the yeast.... easy to kill it - if you make bread every day you can obviously get use to this and skip it but I recommend it in the beginning (must be between 110- 115F)

set a time to make sure its been 10 min to proof it (and make sure the yeast is actually alive and active -- if it doesn't look like the "head" of a rootbeer - all foamy w little bubbles - its not good and your bread isn't going to work period!)

also Lola is right about the wheat / white ratio....start w mainly white AP (unbleached is fine but not whole wheat) - wheat bread is a bit more difficult for most people its probably easier to start w mainly white

#11 Tim the Beek

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 09:56 PM

Been digging foolin' around with sourdough. Take some advance planning, as it needs and 8-12 hour dough rise/proof, and another 2-4 hour loaf proof/rise before it goes into the oven

This time of year, it's pretty easy to make it very mild, as you'd have to put the loaves somewhere warmer than room temperature in order to have the bacterial part of the culture add any meaningful sourness.

Made a nice loaf a couple of days ago using whey leftover from cheesemaking instead of milk or water.

#12 cj

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 11:18 PM

http://www.cookingbr...ead_recipe.html

this recipe makes an absolutely delicious bread. i have made it a few times, and while time consuming, it is easy enough. i don't have a mixer, i make it by hand. :)