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Shock finding: More than 75 percent of all 'honey' sold in grocery stores contains no


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#1 TEO

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 07:42 PM

Shock finding: More than 75 percent of all 'honey' sold in grocery stores contains no honey at all, by definition (Updated)

Learn more: http://www.naturalne...l#ixzz1dQZDQ3Im

(NaturalNews) Just because those cute little bear-shaped bottles at the grocery store say "honey" on them does not necessarily mean that they actually contain honey. A comprehensive investigation conducted by Food Safety News (FSN) has found that the vast majority of so-called honey products sold at grocery stores, big box stores, drug stores, and restaurants do not contain any pollen, which means they are not real honey.

For the investigation, Vaughn Bryant, one of the nation's leading melissopalynologists, or experts in identifying pollen in honey, and director of the Palynology Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University, evaluated more than 60 products labeled as "honey" that had been purchased by FSN from ten states and the District of Columbia.

Bryant found that 76 percent of "honey" samples purchased from major grocery store chains like Kroger and Safeway, and 77 percent of samples purchased from big box chains like Sam's Club and Wal-Mart, did not contain any pollen. Even worse were "honey" samples taken from drug stores like Walgreens and CVS, and fast food restaurants like McDonald's and KFC, 100 percent of which were found to contain not a trace of pollen.

The full FSN report with a list of all the pollen-less "honey" brands can be accessed here:
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/...

Most conventional honey products have been illegally ultra-filtered to hide their true nature

According to FSN, the lack of pollen in most conventional "honey" products is due to these products having been ultra-filtered. This means that they have been intensely heated, forced through extremely tiny filters, and potentially even watered down or adulterated in some way prior to hitting store shelves.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) holds the position that any so-called honey products that have been ultra-filtered are not actually honey. But the agency refuses to do anything to stop this influx of illegitimate "honey" from flooding the North American market. It also continues to stonewall all petitions to establish a national regulatory standard for verifying the integrity of honey.

Ultra-filtering eliminates and destroys all medicinal properties of honey

Assuming that there is any real honey at all in the phony honey products tested by FSN, the removal of pollen and other delicate materials via ultra-filtering renders them medicinally dead. Raw honey is a health-promoting food that can help alleviate stomach problems, anemia, allergies, and other health conditions. Ultra-filtered honey is nothing more than a health-destroying processed sugar in the same vein as white table sugar or high fructose corn syrup.

The good news is that all of the honey products FSN tested from farmers markets, food cooperatives, and "natural" stores like Trader Joe's and Whole Foods, were found to contain pollen and a full array of antioxidants and other nutrients. Local beekeepers are another great source of obtaining raw, unprocessed, real honey.

Learn more: http://www.naturalne...l#ixzz1dQZgRR98

#2 unbroken_chain

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 07:48 PM

:panic:

what's next :cry:

#3 Jersey Thug

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 07:50 PM

one more great reason to support your local beekeepers :)

((((inexpensive, drug-free seasonal allergy relief))))

#4 Julius

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 07:54 PM

Funny you should post this today. . . yesterday I met a Lithuanian woman who keeps her own bees just south of here. She says her own honey tastes like nothing that can be bought commercially.

We both go the same ultra-conservative gay Estonian hairdresser. A true contradiction of a man. :lol:

#5 TEO

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 07:57 PM

Wonder if Log Cabin and Aunt Jemima have taken to selling honey?

#6 unbroken_chain

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 07:57 PM

She says her own honey tastes like nothing that can be bought commercially.


this is most always the case. :coffee:

#7 Dr. Lostreality

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:01 PM

one more great reason to support your local beekeepers :)

((((inexpensive, drug-free seasonal allergy relief))))


Science says no (I looked into this cause my husband has bad allergies): http://www.sciencedi...081120610619965

Methods

Thirty-six participants who complained of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis were recruited. All recruits were scratch-tested at entry for common aeroallergens. The cohort was randomly assigned to one of three groups, with one receiving locally collected, unpasteurized, unfiltered honey, the second nationally collected, filtered, and pasteurized honey, and the third, corn syrup with synthetic honey flavoring. They were asked to consume one tablespoonful a day of the honey or substitute and to follow their usual standard care for the management of their symptoms. All participants were instructed to maintain a diary tracking 10 subjective allergy symptoms, and noting the days on which their symptoms were severe enough to require their usual antiallergy medication.

Results

Neither honey group experienced relief from their symptoms in excess of that seen in the placebo group.

#8 Mind Left Body

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:03 PM

My Dad has his own hive. I get my honey from him. Amazing stuff!! :smile:

#9 In A Silent Way

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:12 PM

one more great reason to support your local beekeepers :)

((((inexpensive, drug-free seasonal allergy relief))))

Actually, the bee keeper I used to buy from was convicted of criminal mischief, conspiracy and criminal trespass after he boarded the submarine "USS Florida" by canoe, hammered on several missile hatches, poured blood, and with spray paint, renamed the submarine "USS Auschwitz."

#10 B. Diddy

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:13 PM

We both go the same ultra-conservative gay Estonian hairdresser. A true contradiction of a man.


WOW! A hairdresser...from ESTONIA?!?! HAS THE WORLD GONE MAAAAAD?!?!?!

#11 Uncle Coulro

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:17 PM

Science says no ... They were asked to consume one tablespoonful a day of the honey or substitute ... Neither honey group experienced relief from their symptoms in excess of that seen in the placebo group.

There's the problem. For allergy relief, don't eat it - pour it down your nostrils with a neti p*t. :vanilla raccoon:

#12 Jersey Thug

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:25 PM

Science says no (I looked into this cause my husband has bad allergies): http://www.sciencedi...081120610619965


i'm a big fan of science. i'm also a big fan of figuring out for myself what works and what doesn't, rather than taking anyone else's word for it.

my story: during the usual allergy seasons, i wake up most mornings with itchy eyes, runny nose and a tickle in my throat. i used to take a daily RX pill that was costly and had side effects i'd rather live without.

i have a relationship with a local farmer who sells her own chickens' eggs, the raw honey from a friend's hive and other locally produced items. i started off buying the honey because it's DELICIOUS and i like supporting local businesses - she doesn't make any claims about the potential benefits of eating honey, she just stocks the stuff along with all her other local goods...but i realized that if i take a teaspoon of honey in the morning or whenever symptoms begin, it always helps my allergies to some extent, and almost always eradicates all symptoms for at least 10 hours, without medication.

if the symptoms return before bedtime, i take a second dose, and they go away again. so it isn't the shower clearing away the ick, or leaving the house/area where i'm symptomatic...i've considered all of that.

i haven't taken a single pill or other medication for allergies this fall, for the first time in at least 10 years. :boogie:

#13 jnjn

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:25 PM

& local is best...it carries the pollen that's naturally occurring in your environment

#14 shadeelady

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:41 PM

if you have allergies, the honey needs to be local honey so you can build up an immunity to the local pollens that are causing your allergies. it doesn't work in one spoonful.

#15 KrisNYG

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:52 PM

if you have allergies, the honey needs to be local honey so you can build up an immunity to the local pollens that are causing your allergies. it doesn't work in one spoonful.


:thup:

I'll bee ( :lol: ) interested to see Tim's take on this article.

#16 KittyRocks

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 01:12 AM

so glad i have an aunt who owns an apiary! go thru tons of her honey in the winter :Phishfolk: and im pretty sure its not fake :funny1:

#17 KittyRocks

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 01:21 AM

i dont know about allergies but science says it DOES seem to be an anti-bacterial and also ive read newer studies that say maybe anti-viral too. in fact, some very promising studies are showing that it may even hold the key to curing infections from certain antibiotic resistant bacteria! like manuka honey for MRSA! (please note: the MRSA curing honey is a special medical grade product! please do not smear honey on your wounds! hehehe)

i didnt feel like digging for an article but here is a small bone i will throw you freaks :tongue:
http://www.scienceda...00630111037.htm
Sweet news for those looking for new antibiotics: A new research published in the July 2010 print edition of the FASEB Journal explains for the first time how honey kills bacteria. Specifically, the research shows that bees make a protein that they add to the honey, called defensin-1, which could one day be used to treat burns and skin infections and to develop new drugs that could combat antibiotic-resistant infections.

"We have completely elucidated the molecular basis of the antibacterial activity of a single medical-grade honey, which contributes to the applicability of honey in medicine," said Sebastian A.J. Zaat, Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Department of Medical Microbiology at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam. "Honey or isolated honey-derived components might be of great value for prevention and treatment of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria."

To make the discovery, Zaat and colleagues investigated the antibacterial activity of medical-grade honey in test tubes against a panel of antibiotic-resistant, disease-causing bacteria. They developed a method to selectively neutralize the known antibacterial factors in honey and determine their individual antibacterial contributions. Ultimately, researchers isolated the defensin-1 protein, which is part of the honey bee immune system and is added by bees to honey. After analysis, the scientists concluded that the vast majority of honey's antibacterial properties come from that protein. This information also sheds light on the inner workings of honey bee immune systems, which may one day help breeders create healthier and heartier honey bees.
"We've known for millennia that honey can be good for what ails us, but we haven't known how it works," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of the FASEB Journal, "Now that we've extracted a potent antibacterial ingredient from honey, we can make it still more effective and take the sting out of bacterial infections."


#18 DancingBearly

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 06:56 AM

one more great reason to support your local beekeepers :)

((((inexpensive, drug-free seasonal allergy relief))))


Going to talk to our local beekeeper soon about setting a few hives on our property. We have some bramble berries( raspberries, blackberry) and plan on planting more types of berries. Plan on a nice organic berry farm and having bees on the property will help. Plus it will go with our chosen name: "Bee Berry Happy Farm" :mrgreen:

#19 TEO

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 11:58 AM

Nice name! I grew up where we could pick and eat wild bramble berries, so good.

#20 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 12:22 PM

We received some raw honey with some honey comb in it from a bee-keeper friend as a wedding gift - it is sweetest honey I have ever tasted! :mrgreen:

#21 insolent cur

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 12:35 PM

farmer's market. :thup:

the last jar i bought was made by bees that were spending time near hot pepper plants. as a result, this batch has some real bite to it. it's delicious and i've never had honey like it before.

#22 hippiechickme

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 01:38 PM

This is why I have a bee hive. The honey from my hive tastes like flowers smell. The honey from a store??? Yucky!

#23 Ravn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 01:41 PM

I wish the honey allergy thing worked for me

alas

I have benadryl (the other pills don't work either)


however, we have a bee farm called "Bee City" in our town, they have the bee farm, a store and a baby animal petting zoo. It's win win. I get honey, honey comb and candles, the kids get to pet and feed baby animals :)

#24 Tim the Beek

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 01:59 PM

Don't know firsthand about honey and allergies, though I know people who swear by the notion

What the synopsis TEO posted doesn't mention, and the full article does, is that a real concern about a lot of storebought honey is that it may be contaminated with antibiotics and other chemicals which are illegal to use in the US, but not in other countries.

China is the biggest culprit when it comes to this. Unless something has changed, Chinese honey can't be imported into the US because of that, but there have been numerous cases of China exporting "honey" to other countries and someone slapping a "product of X" (X being the country the Chinese honey was shipped to) label on it and re-exporting it to here.

Google: Chinese Honey Transshipping for more more info.

Sometimes what's shipped as honey is just artificially flavored HFCS or other sugary syrup.

It's a damn shame. Worse even than the bastards who add a little sugar to diverted Montpelier sewage wastewater and call it Vermont Maple Syrup. :funny1:

Buy local, or better still, raise your own! :bee:

It's early yet, but I do believe my typo of the day will end up being "the country the Chinese hiney was shipped to." :funny1:

#25 TEO

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 03:17 PM

:spank: :funny1:

#26 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:15 PM

China is the biggest culprit when it comes to this. Unless something has changed, Chinese honey can't be imported into the US because of that, but there have been numerous cases of China exporting "honey" to other countries and someone slapping a "product of X" (X being the country the Chinese honey was shipped to) label on it and re-exporting it to here.


http://gatheringofth...352#post1211352 :thumbup: :bee:

#27 Uncle Coulro

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 05:36 PM

"Science says ... "
Love it! :funny1:
It really isn't a religion ... yet.

Posted Image

#28 bigtoddy

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 10:51 PM

farmer's market. :thup:

the last jar i bought was made by bees that were spending time near hot pepper plants. as a result, this batch has some real bite to it. it's delicious and i've never had honey like it before.


I've heard storeis of elusive psychoactive honey found in south America. But its a crapshoot since it all depends on what the bees are munching on when they make the honey.

#29 In A Silent Way

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 12:27 AM

Damn those Chinese hiney shippers.

#30 nancykind

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 03:58 PM

if you have to buy honey from the store, buy only u.s. or canadian honey. china is shipping their honey into countries like indonesia, and then indonesia is shipping it into the u.s.

if i have to buy store bought honey, i buy swan's raw unfiltered honey. you CAN find good honey in the store, but the store brands and any other imported honey should be avoided, imo.

#31 PeaceFrog

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 06:01 AM

I've heard storeis of elusive psychoactive honey found in south America. But its a crapshoot since it all depends on what the bees are munching on when they make the honey.


I'm not sure if I trust a product made by spun out bees.

#32 KittyRocks

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 03:40 PM

http://www.npr.org/b...all?ft=1&f=1053

Maybe we're too inclined to believe the worst about supermarket food.

How else to explain the reaction to a recent report about honey on the web site Food Safety News? Food Safety News is published by a lawyer who represents plaintiffs in lawsuits against food manufacturers and processors.

The post, by journalist Andrew Schneider, claimed that most honey on supermarket shelves isn't really honey. As evidence, the site cited tests showing that there is no pollen in most of that honey. (Raw honey contains lots of pollen, which bees collect along with the nectar that they turn into honey.)

If there's no pollen, asserted the story, then the honey must have been "ultrapurified," a technique that can involve diluting honey with extra water, running it through extremely fine filters, and then removing the water.

The article implied that this was part of a deliberate attempt to prevent anyone from detecting illicit honey from China. (The United States blocks imports of Chinese honey because U.S. officials decided that it was being sold at artificially low prices, undercutting American honey producers.) Schneider also reminded his readers that Chinese honey has had a history of safety problems, including contamination with banned antibiotics and lead.

Got that? Food that doesn't deserve its name, processed beyond recognition, probably adulterated, maybe unsafe, of unknown origin. It sounded so right, plenty of people decided that it just had to be true.


Bloggers and online publications ran with the story. "Most honey isn't really honey," posted Grist, repeating much of Schneider's story. "Honey! It isn't real!" shouted TriplePundit. CNN's food blog, Eatocracy, was slightly more measured: "Most honey sold in U.S. grocery stores not worthy of its name." Tom Philpott, food blogger for Mother Jones, picked up the story as well.

Here at NPR, we found the post interesting, too. But then we decided to look into it a little more closely. We talked to honey companies, academic experts, and one of the world's top honey laboratories in Germany. The closer we looked, the more misleading the story in Food Safety News seemed.

First of all, we learned that missing pollen actually is not evidence of "ultrapurification." We visited one of the country's top-tier honey packers, Dutch Gold, in Lancaster, Pa. We saw raw honey getting pumped through layers of white filters. Before the honey hit the filters, a powdered sedimentary rock called diatomaceous earth was added.

This is a standard, widely used process. It removes all the pollen, along with dust, bees' wings, and, of course, the diatomaceous earth. But it is not ultrafiltration, which filters out much more and produces a sweet substance that is no longer, in fact, honey.

Why do packers filter honey? Removing microscopic particles keeps the honey from crystallizing quickly.

"Consumers don't tend to like crystallized honey," says Jill Clark, vice president for sales and marketing at Dutch Gold. "It's very funny. In Canada, there's a lot of creamed honey sold, and people are very accustomed to honey crystallizing. Same in Europe. But the U.S. consumer is very used to a liquid product, and as soon as they see those first granules of crystallization, we get the phone calls: 'Something's wrong with my honey!'"

There's an exception to this filtration process. Dutch Gold also packs organic honey from Brazil, and organic honey doesn't go through nearly as fine a filter. Clark says that this is because organic rules prohibit the use of diatomaceous earth in the filtering process.

Of course, the raw honey that Dutch Gold gets in 50-gallon drums does contain pollen. As part of a recent auditing process, the company sent samples of imported honey that it received from India and Vietnam to a laboratory in Germany. There, scientists analyzed the pollen in that raw honey, and came to the conclusion that it was, in fact, from flowers that grow in the countries that claimed to be producing that honey.

Bottom line: Supermarket honey doesn't have pollen, but you can still call it honey. Call it filtered honey. And the lack of pollen says nothing about where it may have come from.

Now, could there still be fraud going on, involving ultrafiltration and Chinese honey? Yes, but not in the way described by the Food Safety News article.

Some people suspect that Chinese exporters are ultrafiltering some of their honey and sending it to, say, India. There, it could be mixed into raw Indian honey and exported to the US. Pollen analysis would show that this honey was from India, although at least one expert, Vaughn Bryant at Texas A&M University, says that he's seeing imported honey with an unnaturally low concentration of pollen. This, he says, could be evidence of ultrafiltration. Or it could be the kind of filtration done in the U.S., which also removes pollen.

One more thing: It's worth remembering that Chinese honey is barred from the U.S. not because it's unsafe, but because U.S. officials decided it was too cheap. Chinese honey has had more than its share of safety problems. But there's also plenty of perfectly good Chinese honey for sale on the world market. The European Union is much more fussy about honey quality than the U.S., yet the EU imports lots of honey from China.

#33 Tim the Beek

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 03:56 PM

Went and poked around a little more. Apparently Chinese honey imports aren't specifically banned in the US (though they may be in the EU because of concerns about contamination), but the import duties placed upon them because it was determined that China was dumping honey are high enough that they don't ship it here.

#34 Depends

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 04:33 PM

:StillGigglesAtChineseTaint:

#35 china cat

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 05:18 PM

I wouldn't be upset if there was a ban. Importing cheaper products does put American's out of work. deal with it, pay higher prices in order to support U.S. workers.

#36 unbroken_chain

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 05:57 PM

even cars?

#37 china cat

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 07:48 PM

good point, U.C.

For me, I can think of few issues more important than ensuring local agriculture gets the support of Americans (and I am happy when govt initiates policies to support that).

#38 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 01:44 AM

even cars?


If North American auto companies could first build a decent car that would be on-par with those we import, then maybe we could start that conversation. :coffee:

#39 KittyRocks

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 01:47 AM

If North American auto companies could first build a decent car that would be on-par with those we import from Japan, then maybe we could start that conversation. :coffee:


..... hehehe, sorry, im mad at european cars right now.

#40 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 01:53 AM

Oh, I'm talking about Japanese cars. :thumbup: Guess I should have specified! :funny1:

I'm not a big fan of Euro cars myself - too expensive to buy, fill the tank, and maintain imoho.

#41 china cat

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 03:35 AM

If North American auto companies could first build a decent car that would be on-par with those we import, then maybe we could start that conversation. :coffee:



what you posted was my initial response but i deleted.

i'm on toyota number 3 - no complaints :mrgreen:

(((toyota)))

but many foreign cars are made here in the u.s.

#42 TEO

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 02:06 PM

Funny Honey? Bringing Trust To A Sector Fraught With Suspicion

http://www.npr.org/b...ion?sc=fb&cc=fp

Honey is the most natural of sweeteners, coming to us directly from bees and flowers.

Well, maybe not so directly. These days, a long supply chain often links beehives half a world away with the jar of honey in your kitchen. And there's suspicion in that supply chain: global trade disputes; accusations of unfair competition; even honey identity-switching.

To get to the bottom of all this unwholesome controversy, we paid a visit to Dutch Gold Honey in Lancaster, Pa. Dutch Gold is one of the country's top ten honey packers. It sells honey under many different labels, including the house labels of some big supermarket chains.

It is also, as it happens, the birthplace of the now-ubiquitous bear-shaped honey bottle. "Believe it or not, the person who invented the honey bear was Ralph Gamber, the founder of Dutch Gold," says Jill Clark, the company's vice president of sales and marketing. "He and his wife were having dinner with a couple from out west, and they said, 'We really need a new unique container for honey! Winnie the Pooh's really popular, and so is Yogi the Bear, so why don't we come up with a squeezable honey bear?'"

That was 1956. The honey business was simpler, back then. For one thing, American bees made most of America's honey.

Today? Well, just take a peek inside Dutch Gold's warehouse. You see tall stacks of 50-gallon drums, all filled with honey. They come from North Dakota, South Dakota, California, Argentina, Vietnam, and India. More than half of all the honey that Americans consume today is imported from abroad.


But did all that honey really come from bees in the countries that are listed on those steel drums? This is where the accusations of smuggling and forgery arise.

Because there are special restrictions on honey imports from one country: China. And some Chinese honey exporters have been trying to evade those restrictions.

China is the world's biggest producer of honey, and up until a few years ago, it shipped large quantities of honey to the U.S. Chinese honey was cheap. It was so cheap, in fact, that American beekeepers complained it was driving them out of business.

They complained that China was dumping that honey, selling it for an artificially low price.

In 2001, U.S. officials agreed. For most of the following decade, the U.S. tried different ways to slow down imports of Chinese honey, but nothing worked too well. Finally, in 2008, officials simply imposed huge import duties on all honey from China. This made Chinese honey very expensive, and it almost completely shut down imports of honey from China.

But did it really? Dutch Gold's Jill Clark says statistics of U.S. honey imports tell a curious story. At the moment when imports of Chinese honey dried up, "all of a sudden we saw these other countries starting to sell a lot of honey into the U.S., and they weren't countries that tended to have any commercial beekeeping." The big increases came from some of China's neighbors: Taiwan, Malaysia, and Indonesia.

Clark says that Dutch Gold figured it had to be falsely labeled honey that was really coming from China. "We were offered it many times, and with these very cheap prices we knew exactly what it was. It was nothing that we wanted anything to do with whatsoever," she says.

There was more evidence than just the price. There was pollen. When bees collect nectar from flowers, they bring back pollen, too, and it ends up in raw honey. Scientists can look at those grains of pollen under a microscope and tell if they came from flowers that grow in China, but not Indonesia.

Ron Phipps, president of a honey importing company called CPNA International, got some samples of the Indonesian and Malaysian honey, and decided to check them out. "We've had them tested and the pollen content was typical of China, and not of those countries," he says.


The evidence that this was really Chinese honey was so convincing that U.S. government officials stepped in to shut down those imports, too. They held up shipments, demanding more documentation. They indicted some Chinese and German honey dealers for fraud.

The honey from Indonesia and Malaysia dried up late last year, as quickly as it appeared.

But Phipps believes that Chinese exporters have found a new trade route. This year, he says, "we saw a huge surge in Indian honey entering our country."

Phipps is convinced that this is really Chinese honey, too. But this time the evidence is not as clear. Unlike Malaysia and Indonesia, India does have a history of honey production. Also, laboratories are not finding Chinese pollen in this honey.

Phipps thinks that the lack of pollen is simply evidence that the Chinese have found another way to game the system. He thinks that the Chinese are filtering that honey before they export it, to remove the pollen. Then they're mixing it into raw Indian honey, with pollen that indicates that it's from India.

It's suspicion, not proof. But as long as the U.S. tries to block honey from the world's biggest honey producer, there will be suspicion that China is finding ways around the American blockade. Every shipment of honey from Asia is suspect.

Some honey retailers have decided that this is bad for business, and bad for the image of honey.

Five of the biggest honey retailers in the country — including Dutch Gold — are setting up a system that they hope will clear away all that suspicion.

It's called True Source Honey.

Eric Wenger is president of True Source Honey. Soon, he's going to Vietnam, to help with the first audit of a Vietnamese honey exporter.

"The question we want to answer is, does that exporter only purchase honey from beekeepers in that country?," he says.

The exporter will give the True Source auditor a list of the beekeepers where it buys honey. "Then the auditor will randomly select a number of those beekeepers, go out to that beekeeper's apiary, and evaluate the capacity of that beekeeper to produce the volume that that exporter claimed was purchased and shipped," says Wenger.

If everything checks out, that exporter is certified. But even after that, True Source will take samples from every shipment of honey and send those samples to a lab in Germany, to see if the pollen matches the flowers that are actually blooming in Vietnam.

True Source wants to expand this system globally. One exporter in India is already certified.

Jill Clark, from Dutch Gold Honey, says these sorts of audited, verified supply chains are getting more common throughout the food business. In some cases, governments are requiring it.

"With all the food safety and food security issues, knowing where your food comes from right now is incredibly important," she says.

#43 nancykind

nancykind

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 02:18 PM

If North American auto companies could first build a decent car that would be on-par with those we import, then maybe we could start that conversation. :coffee:


foreign owned car companies do build cars here - that i know of are toyota, honda, mitsubishi, nissan, hyundai, kia, isuzu and subaru - all built in american plants.