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#1901 PeaceFrog

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:21 PM

Dave Chappelle illustrating what it would look like if black collar crime was handled the same way as white collar crime:



#1902 vic

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:26 PM

Some bankers at some banks may have done something that they're paying fines for :dunno:


well that's about the extent of the answer, which is mass fraud, and noone has been arrested...if you think the fines are plenty then that's your opinion. and maybe that's your problem. derp.

#1903 vic

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:31 PM

anyway, this is from california state ca[ital student march yesterday...good shit:

Posted Image

#1904 PeaceFrog

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:32 PM

I can't even read TASB's posts anymore. His spelling ability and grammar seems to be devolve over time.

#1905 capt_morgan

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:34 PM

so do you have an actual opinion on this or are you just posting articles for the sake of such as usual?





:funny1:

#1906 PeaceFrog

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:37 PM

matter of fact, at least PF actually gives an opinion on things. jack just posts articles from ny post and fox and throws his smug pro-cop arrogance around without offering anything of substance elsewhere.


I'm open to the sharing and discussion of ideas. I may come across as harsh or abrasive, but my intention is not merely to be a "shit stirrer" as Joke used to have written below his avatar.

#1907 vic

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:38 PM

so do you have an actual opinion on this or are you just posting articles for the sake of such as usual?





:funny1:


good shit:



what more do you want?:gop:

#1908 PeaceFrog

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:41 PM

I thought I was civil in disagreeing with your support of Ron Paul (vic). I understand why you do, and I can't blame you.

Also, you realize that many of his ideas would erase 150 years worth of progress in the area of civil rights.

#1909 capt_morgan

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:42 PM

there are shitters...shitees...shit stirrers...and eaters. gonna break few omlettes makin eggs and shit ingredients cookin up the world go round sometimes....er thats what they say

#1910 capt_morgan

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:43 PM

what more do you want?:gop:

i lol'd
:)

#1911 PeaceFrog

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:47 PM

life is a lot like a shit sandwich

the more bread you got, the less shit you gotta eat!

#1912 Joker

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:48 PM

well that's about the extent of the answer, which is mass fraud, and noone has been arrested...if you think the fines are plenty then that's your opinion. and maybe that's your problem. derp.

So the extent of the answer is an article that doesn't answer the question? Derp is fucking right :lol:

Do you think they should just mass arrest all the bankers?

The article clearly states Madoff was arrested and that others are being fined, so they're obviously upholding the law no matter how much you want to believe otherwise.

#1913 capt_morgan

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:49 PM

the bread has no nutritional value

#1914 PeaceFrog

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 08:52 PM

it has more than the shit does.

#1915 capt_morgan

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 09:04 PM

According to the Korean "No Cut News", a Japanese scientist has created "dung meat" out of human feces. It is said to be high in nutritious value. This news has hit the Korean web by storm, and many Korean Internet users are taking the opportunity to take jabs at the Korean government. Reported by China Net Japanese.

According to the report, Japanese scientist Ikeda Mitsuyuki has determined in reprocessing experiments that human feces are rich in proteins, and has created edible "dung meat". Ikeda explains, "This dung meat is comprised of proteins distilled from human feces, along with bean products and beef. It tastes the same as beef."

This "meat" contains 63% protein as well as 25% carbohydrates. It is thus highly nutritious, and costs 10 to 20 times more than normal meat.

There has been a large response on Korean portal site "Daum". One user made a comment regarding Korean government officials, stating "The Government house should buy a ton of this dung meat. I'd like to see them set up cameras in their cafeterias and televise their meals. It'd be fun to watch the government eat sh#t."

Another user writes, "Japanese scientists are able to make food out of sh#t. They are clearly very technologically advanced. Korean scientists have a lot to learn from them."

(Edited by Yonehara Yuko)

#1916 vic

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 09:07 PM

So the extent of the answer is an article that doesn't answer the question? Derp is fucking right :lol:

Do you think they should just mass arrest all the bankers?

The article clearly states Madoff was arrested and that others are being fined, so they're obviously upholding the law no matter how much you want to believe otherwise.


did they not mass arrest the protesters dozens of times?

maddoff=one arrest

fining does not = arrest

#1917 PeaceFrog

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 09:09 PM

According to the Korean "No Cut News", a Japanese scientist has created "dung meat" out of human feces. It is said to be high in nutritious value. This news has hit the Korean web by storm, and many Korean Internet users are taking the opportunity to take jabs at the Korean government. Reported by China Net Japanese.

According to the report, Japanese scientist Ikeda Mitsuyuki has determined in reprocessing experiments that human feces are rich in proteins, and has created edible "dung meat". Ikeda explains, "This dung meat is comprised of proteins distilled from human feces, along with bean products and beef. It tastes the same as beef."

This "meat" contains 63% protein as well as 25% carbohydrates. It is thus highly nutritious, and costs 10 to 20 times more than normal meat.

There has been a large response on Korean portal site "Daum". One user made a comment regarding Korean government officials, stating "The Government house should buy a ton of this dung meat. I'd like to see them set up cameras in their cafeterias and televise their meals. It'd be fun to watch the government eat sh#t."

Another user writes, "Japanese scientists are able to make food out of sh#t. They are clearly very technologically advanced. Korean scientists have a lot to learn from them."

(Edited by Yonehara Yuko)


That's a helluva Joker impersonation! :lmao:

#1918 vic

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 09:15 PM

bad shit:

Public release of task force report postponed
Email this articleDate: 2012-03-05
Contact: UC Office of the President
Phone: (510) 987-9200
Email:
>>Reynoso letter to task force

The University of California Office of the President was informed today (Monday, March 5) that the union representing UC campus police and a police officer at the center of the pepper-spray incident at UC Davis will request a court order to halt public disclosure of a report by a task force headed by former California Supreme Court Associate Justice Cruz Reynoso.
As a result, Reynoso postponed the public release of the report, which had been scheduled for tomorrow afternoon (Tuesday, March 6). Both he and UC President Mark G. Yudof expressed a commitment to making the full report accessible to the public.

"Due to the uncertainty created by this legal development, General Counsel has advised that any information relating to the Task Force Report or Kroll should not be released publicly by the University or individual members of the Task Force," Reynoso wrote to task force members.

He added: "I was very frustrated to receive this news today. However, let me assure you that I am undeterred in my commitment to release the complete and unredacted work of the Task Force, a view shared by President Yudof."

The attorney for the Federated University Police Officers Association informed the UC Office of the General Counsel that it will request a temporary restraining order in Alameda County Superior Court tomorrow (Tuesday, March 6). The request will be submitted by an attorney representing one or more of the officers placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of investigations into pepper-spraying of students at UC Davis on Nov. 18, 2011.

Reynoso and 12 other task force members had been scheduled to outline their findings and recommendations to the UC Davis community on Tuesday, March 6, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the UC Davis Conference Center ballroom.

"I am disappointed," Yudof said, "and I have asked the UC General Counsel's office to do everything in its power in court to turn back this attempt to stifle these reports. The work of the Reynoso Task Force, supported by outside investigators from the Kroll group, is a fundamental stepping stone needed to carry the UC Davis campus past the events of Friday, Nov. 18. The entire UC Davis community deserves a fully transparent and unexpurgated accounting of the incidents in question. Though I have not seen the reports, I am told the task force and its supporting investigators have provided just such an accounting."

UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi requested on Nov. 21, 2011, that Yudof form a task force to look into the pepper-spray incident. Yudof, in turn, named Reynoso, professor emeritus at the UC Davis School of Law, as the chair. Yudof also initiated a systemwide review of police policies and procedures as they pertain to protest activities on campuses, and that effort is ongoing.

NOTE: The UC Office of the President has been informed that the request for the temporary restraining order will be presented tomorrow, Tuesday, March 6, at 9:30 a.m. in Department 31 of the Alameda County Superior Court, located at 1225 Fallon St., Oakland, Calif. 94612. We will advise you if we hear anything different in the morning.



http://www.universit...s/article/27256

#1919 Joker

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 09:24 PM

did they not mass arrest the protesters dozens of times?

maddoff=one arrest

fining does not = arrest


Yes they did arrest mass protesters. Do you think it was right and that it should be done to all bankers?

There's been at least a few arrests and fining IS enforcing the law

The Truth-O-Meter Says:

"Not a single banker, a CEO from Wall Street, anyone from corporate America — nobody, (there was) not one arrest of any of these people who brought down the economy in 2008."

Our ruling

Moore said, "Not a single banker, a CEO from Wall Street, anyone from corporate America — nobody, (there was) not one arrest of any of these people who brought down the economy in 2008." Well, there have been a few arrests. Certainly the executives of Taylor, Bean & Whitaker who were arrested would qualify as "corporate America."


But Moore's larger point is correct -- there have been very few arrests among executives of firms the public would associate with causing the financial crisis. Obama implied in his recent remarks that it was because many of their actions weren't criminal.

Whatever the cause, we rate Moore's statement Mostly True.



http://www.politifac...down-economy-s/


:smile:

#1920 Joker

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 10:49 PM

That's a helluva Joker impersonation! :lmao:


Eat me Posted Image

#1921 PeaceFrog

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 10:51 PM

what if I don't? Are you going to beat me up?

#1922 Joker

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 12:32 AM

Occupy protesters attacked by AIPAC crowd

!

#1923 Bone Daddy

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 05:30 PM

I hope they file assault charges. Good video evidence.

#1924 Joker

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:14 PM

Elk Grove man sued by city for alleged Occupy Oakland vandalism

An Elk Grove man is being sued by the City of Oakland after officials said he committed acts of vandalism and destruction at an Occupy Oakland demonstration on Nov. 3, 2011.

Oakland City Attorney Barbara Parker said Cesar Aguirre, 24, was being sued for about $7,000 after he was arrested during the demonstration for allegedly smashing the windows of the Oakland Police Department with a metal chair.

Security cameras caught the incident on tape.

However, Aguirre said he didn't do it.

"I was trying to protect myself from the high powered bean bags being shot at me by police, I was trying to dislodge some boards from windows to shield me," Aguirre said.

The lawsuit claims Aguirre walked from the center of City Hall Plaza to the front of the Internal Affairs and Recruiting Office carrying a red, metal folding chair with which he smashed the glass door of the building. The complaint then states Aguirre hit a board behind the glass door with the chair several times before dropping the chair and ramming his body against the board in an attempt to access the building.

Aguirre admits to being part of the occupy movement, but doesn't condone violence or vandalism.

Oakland's Community Law Unit in the city attorney's office filed the lawsuit against Aguirre on Feb. 27 to cover repairs and costs to secure the building. Parker also stated that because Aguirre damaged public property intentionally, Oakland could seek punitive damages under the law.

"Not only does this behavior show profound disrespect for local businesses and residents who suffer when the city has to expend scarce resources to repair vandalized property, it shows real disdain for our city's long tradition of peaceful protest and dissent, and undermines the legitimate goal of addressing economic injustice," Parker said.

The City of Oakland said there will be other lawsuits as it reviews more cases.


Video
http://www.news10.ne...opnews|bc|large

#1925 TEO

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:55 PM

Occupy New Haven was served notice:

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#1926 Joker

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 01:15 PM

UC Berkeley: 5 charged in baton-jabbing protest

Five people have been charged in connection with an Occupy protest at UC Berkeley in November that attracted national attention after a YouTube video showed police jabbing their batons at screaming students.

The Alameda County district attorney's office charged four students and a professor last week with misdemeanor resisting arrest and other crimes, Teresa Drenick, a spokeswoman for the office, said Monday.

The charges stem from a Nov. 9 protest that attracted thousands of students to Sproul Plaza to protest UC Berkeley officials' decision to remove tents from the steps of the administration building.

When campus police and Alameda County sheriff's deputies moved in, they jabbed batons into the midsections of protesters trying to prevent them from reaching the tents. Thirty-nine people were arrested.

Some of the defendants said they were upset that prosecutors had filed charges after Chancellor Robert Birgeneau said officials would not seek disciplinary action against those arrested.

The charges "seem odd, given the evidence of what I think was excessive force and irregular arrest procedures," said English Professor Celeste Langan, 54, one of those charged. A video of the protest showed police grabbing her by the hair and yanking her to the ground.

Drenick said she couldn't comment on why Langan and the others had been charged.

"What is brought to us for purposes of review is the evidence gathered by the police officers," she said.

Charged with resisting arrest were Langan and UC Berkeley students Jasper Bernes, 37, Ricardo Gomez, 22, Ramon Quintero, 25, and Zakary Habash, 21. Some were also charged with misdemeanor blocking a public right of way and failing to disperse.

They are scheduled to be arraigned later this month in Alameda County Superior Court.



Read more: http://www.sfgate.co...L#ixzz1p0CejGRE

#1927 Bone Daddy

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 04:15 PM

Take it to trial and see if a jury will convict.

#1928 Joker

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 06:07 PM

:sad:

New Haven police arrest suspect in Occupy camp sex assault


Officers arrested England Gamble of Orange Street in New Haven Wednesday for an alleged sexual assault during the early morning hours of Tuesday, or possibly late Monday, at the Occupy New Haven encampment on the Green.

Gamble was charged with first-degree sexual assault and first-degree unlawful restraint.

Officers Curtis Miller and Scott Durkin had been dispatched at 3:25 p.m. Tuesday to the encampment on the upper Town Green in response to a report of sexual assault. There, they met several Occupiers, one of whom had gone to check on a woman she hadn

#1929 vic

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 06:13 PM

while it is always sad to hear about someone being raped, i don't see the point to you feeling the need to report every sexual assault and other negativities in this thread. other than your agenda to turn people on this message board against a movement because you don't like it, it makes no sense to post that article here.

#1930 vic

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 06:17 PM

actually related to the Occupy Movement as a whole:


http://www.alternet....ng/?page=entire

What Has Occupy Been Up To? 6 Great Actions You Can't Miss This Spring
Occupy changed over the winter from outdoor camps to internal work and debates. But that laid the groundwork for a very big spring. Here's what to expect.
March 13, 2012 |
Photo Credit: Sarah Jaffe LIKE THIS ARTICLE ?
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This past weekend the air in New York started feeling warm again; that first hint of spring in the way the air smells and feels. While it has been one of the warmest winters on record in New York City it was still winter. It was still bitterly cold often, it was still gray often and if you were used to spending time outside as part of Occupy, it became hard to have meetings and protests and marches outside. This has made it seem as if Occupy has gone away; in fact, for the past few months I have often been asked questions such as: “Are you still involved with Occupy?”

I answer these questions with a long list of actions and meetings and protests and ways we are planning for the spring. But I also answer it by saying simply: “Occupy, of course, has not gone away because the issues and problems it brought up and the questions it has asked of society have also not gone away.”

While most of the occupations around the country, and around the world, have been dismantled (most recently Occupy London last week) and Occupy has less of a physical presence in that there are not as many occupied public spaces, this does not mean that Occupy, as a movement, is any less real.

But during the winter Occupy did have to change. The intensity of our early days is over, the days, weeks and months when we proved that this is a real movement, that we aren't going away because the questions we are asking and the problems we are highlighting are too important. The early days were beautiful, they were inspiring, but it is now that we are being deliberate, that we are building relationships with each other and with our communities, it is now that we are building our infrastructure, it is now that we are doing the internal work that we need to do in order to be smarter, faster, better at bringing people together, better at sustaining ourselves as a movement, it is now that we are more committed then ever. And we have been planning for the spring. So below I present you with a list of things to look out for from Occupy in the coming weeks and months and as it goes from winter, finally, to spring:

1. Fight BAC! Occupy Takes on Bank of America

One of the big new projects to come out of the winter is the Fight BAC (Bank of America) campaign. The message of this campaign is beautifully simple: Bank of America's financial problems have led it to being propped up by the government and in the coming year it might need a bailout. Instead of being bailed out it should be broken up into smaller banks that have more community control. The reason it is failing is because of its fraudulent mortgage practices that have led to the foreclosure and housing crisis and it does not deserve more taxpayer money to foreclose on people's homes. This is a chance for the country to have a real discussion about the financial industry, and alternatives to it, as well as what collective wealth means and can do.

This is a campaign with a broad-based and nationwide coalition. The best way to get involved? Participate in one of the March 15 actions being planned (see this Web site) and move your money out of Bank of America (use this simple tool here).

2. May Day General Strike: A Day Without the 99 Percent

Occupy Wall Street has called for a general strike in New York City on May 1 and for it to be thought of as a “day without the 99 percent.” Traditionally a tool of labor unions, a general strike allows workers of every kind to join together and withdraw their labor from the economy, therefore showing their collective power. Occupy is working with unions to plan marches and protests. By calling for a general strike to be thought of as a “day without the 99 percent” (like the 2006 Day Without Immigrants) there is the chance to reframe a general strike as a day in which everyone who feels disenfranchised from our current political and economic system must take action. Therefore on May 1 Occupy is also calling for a Student Debt Strike, a Student Strike, an Art Strike, a Women’s Strike, a Housing Strike. Here the idea of a strike can be rethought so people can take to the streets to demand the changes they want to see in all of these areas of their lives.

What to do? Get involved with planning May 1 here. To learn more about the history of May Day, attend one of these events. Also prepare to join everyone in the streets on May 1 in what will be a day of joyfully coming together.

3. The Student Movement

Inspired by Occupy, but distinct from it, the Occupy education movement has taken off. Most recently there was the March 1 nationwide day of Student Action which saw protests around the country from California to Chicago to New York. This day of action focused on the issues of student debt, school closings and the increasing privatization of education.

In New York City, the fight over education is not just at the level of higher education, where students want to graduate with less debt and where students in the CUNY system are still fighting over budget cuts that raise tuition while increasing class sizes, but also at the middle school and high school level. The Department of Education is closing schools it claims are “failing,” leaving parents and students, mostly from districts that are primarily low-income people of color, increasingly disenfranchised from having power over their children's education and scrambling to find places to send their children to school.

From the elementary all the way to the higher education level this struggle is one over the right to education, who has control over our educational systems and the issue of student debt. What to do? Sign the student debt refusal pledge here and pledge, when they have a million signees, to stop paying. And look out for actions on April 25, the day that student debt is going to surpass $1 trillion.

4. Occupy Our Homes

Occupy Our Homes brings attention to the disconnect between the fact that there are thousands of homeless people and thousands of empty homes. The movement demands that the banks negotiate with people instead of just foreclosing on their homes. In doing so Occupy Our Homes articulates our dissatisfaction with banks and the financial industry but it also works to connect these issues to the ways these industries affect people’s lives. Along with eviction defenses and occupying foreclosed homes, more recently Occupy Our Homes has been shutting down foreclosure auctions by singing; a beautiful way to participate in some important civil disobedience. Watch a video here.

Find out more about what Occupy Our Homes has planned here and look out for the upcoming nationwide week of action against the banks March 12-16.

5. Re-Occupations: Citywide Assembly and Pop-Up Occupations

Since Occupy Wall Street lost Zuccotti Park, the question of reoccupation has been on everyone's minds, and on December 17 a failed attempt was made to take Duarte Square. Since then, people have occasionally tried to sleep in Zuccotti Park (most recently last week) and the idea of reoccupation has been thrown around. Whether Occupy Wall Street does reoccupy a space or a park in the spring remains to be seen but what is for sure is that there are plans for, and have already been, lots of pop-up occupations around New York City. These pop-up occupations are a chance for people to come out and gather in a park (last time Tompkins Square park in the East Village) and for different working groups to talk to people about what to do. These events are fun and give Occupy a chance to do outreach as well as meet together in a park for an afternoon -- look out for lots more of these in the spring.

The other type of non-traditional reoccupation to look out for is the Citywide Assembly that is being planned for April 14. This will take place somewhere big, fun and public in New York City. The idea behind the Citywide Assembly is simple: to have a positive and festive day to re-open the spring. Here there will be organizations from inside and outside the movement represented, tabling and connecting with people but there will also be music, teach-ins, dancing, games played as well as meetings and collective time for people to reconnect, be drawn into the movement and to be excited about it. Watch out for more information on all these exciting versions of occupation.

5. Representing Ourselves, Organizing Ourselves: New Publications, Nationwide Coordination and Better Structures

While the movement has been planning actions and projects and protests for the spring, it has also spent the winter having deep internal conversations and taking on some of the structural issues that arose in the fall. This has been done in a wide range of ways: from the People of Color Caucus being engaged in conversations about what its purpose and goal should be to the Safer Spaces working group writing and then fine-tuning a Community Agreement that can serve as a template for the rest of the movement about how we treat each other and act as part of the movement, to people questioning our structures and if they are still the best way for the movement to organize itself.

The movement has also started to coordinate nationwide through the creation of an inter-occupy network in which people from occupations around the country have channels to connect with each other, share experiences and resources and plan together. You can find out more about them here. Lastly there are new publications for the spring, with another issue of the Occupied Wall Street Journal and the second issue of the Occupy Theory journal Tidal just out (you can see Tidal here.) One of the strengths of Occupy has been its ability to self-represent and theorize itself and to produce materials in which to do so. With new issues of both of these publications, Occupy is ready to take on the task of producing its own media in the spring.

Some call it wintering; the resting and planning and preparing that happens during the winter in preparation for the spring. Occupy might have been quieter in the past few months but that does not mean it was over. In fact the reality is far from it. The plotting and planning and resting that Occupy has done through the winter means that we are all the more ready for the spring and all the more ready for everyone to join us now and then.

Manissa McCleave Maharawal is a doctoral student in the anthropology

#1931 PeaceFrog

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 06:33 PM

while it is always sad to hear about someone being raped, i don't see the point to you feeling the need to report every sexual assault and other negativities in this thread. other than your agenda to turn people on this message board against a movement because you don't like it, it makes no sense to post that article here.


this is what I've been trying to say for a while now.

I stopped reading his posts because they were just irrelevant, but it doesn't take long to figure out his motive.

I'm thinking most people are probably smart enough to catch on to his routine.

#1932 Joker

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 08:23 PM

while it is always sad to hear about someone being raped, i don't see the point to you feeling the need to report every sexual assault and other negativities in this thread. other than your agenda to turn people on this message board against a movement because you don't like it, it makes no sense to post that article here.

I don't report every sexual assault :dunno:

This article happens to be about the cops catching the suspect, I take that as a positive. Of course, that's probably why you see it as a negative :lol:

I hope people continue to support the movement as long as it's peaceful.

The "negative" articles are mostly pointing out the violence and criminal element that some people seem to support. The more the movement stays away from that type of shit the better.

#1933 vic

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 08:34 PM

suite backtrack:funny1:

#1934 vic

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 08:37 PM

i commend the cops for doing their ACTUAL job in this case, but any idiot knows that your motive is to point out a rape at an occupy site

#1935 Joker

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 08:55 PM

No backtrack at all.

There's absolutely no indication the rapist had anything to do with the Occupy movement.

My motive was to point out the cops doing something good concerning Occupy because "you feel the need to report every assault and other negativities in this thread."

You better put that tinfoil hat back on before they find you :wink:

#1936 PeaceFrog

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 09:04 PM

I'm trying not to be combative here.

You are severely misunderstood.

#1937 vic

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 10:21 PM

No backtrack at all.

There's absolutely no indication the rapist had anything to do with the Occupy movement.

My motive was to point out the cops doing something good concerning Occupy because "you feel the need to report every assault and other negativities in this thread."

You better put that tinfoil hat back on before they find you :wink:


riiiiight...i don't buy it or give a fuck about it

why the frown before the post if you were pointing out the positive?

#1938 vic

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 10:55 PM

Shocking No One, NYPD Surveillance Extends To Occupy Wall Street

Occupy Wall Street
The NYPD's surveillance tactics have gotten plenty of press for keeping tabs on Muslim communities far and wide, but it appears they're watching Occupy Wall Street just as closely. The Times reports that three protesters are suing the city after an incident in November led to their arrest for obstructing governmental administration, charges that were later dropped by the DA's office. According to 20-year-old Kira Moyer-Sims, 30 police officers surrounded the car they were sitting in and later drilled her on her relationship with the movement. “I felt like I had been arrested for a thought crime,” Moyer-Sims said.
As in the case of the department's surveillance of Muslims, the NYPD's ability to keep tabs on political activity derives from the Handschu agreement, the terms of which were significantly loosened after 9/11. Those new powers also came in handy around the 2004 GOP convention. “The N.Y.P.D. surveillance does not appear to be limited to unlawful activity,” NYCLU's executive director Donna Lieberman said. Indeed, it appears to include people who sit in cafes or go white water rafting.
Another protester came home to her Bushwick apartment to find officers outside her building to perform a "security check." They followed her into her building and threatened her with arrest if she didn't let them enter.
And a 32-year-old engineer from Virginia who is a Pakistani-born, naturalized U.S. citizen was arrested at a protest in January and asked "whether he had ever been to Yemen or met anyone connected to Al Qaeda," and was rigorously questioned about his work and travel history.

http://gothamist.com...s_to_occupy.php

#1939 vic

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 10:57 PM

Wall Street Protesters Complain of Police Surveillance
By COLIN MOYNIHAN
Published: March 11, 2012
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On Nov. 17, Kira Moyer-Sims was near the Manhattan Bridge, buying coffee while three friends waited nearby in a car. More than a dozen blocks away, protesters gathered for an Occupy Wall Street “day of action,” which organizers had described as an attempt to block the streets around the New York Stock Exchange.
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William Widmer for The New York Times
Kira Moyer-Sims said she was arrested in November while blocks away from protesters. Her lawyer said she and three others were preparing to sue the city.
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Times Topic: Occupy Movement (Occupy Wall Street)
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Then, Ms. Moyer-Sims said, about 30 police officers surrounded her and the people in the car.

All four were arrested, said Vik Pawar, a lawyer for Ms. Moyer-Sims and two of the others, and taken to a police facility in the East Village. He said officers strip-searched them and ignored their requests for a lawyer. The fourth person could not be reached for comment.

Ms. Moyer-Sims, 20, said members of the Police Department’s intelligence division asked about her personal history, her relationship with other protesters, the nature of Occupy Wall Street and plans for upcoming protests.

“I felt like I had been arrested for a thought crime,” she said.

Mr. Pawar said that the police had charged his three clients, Ms. Moyer-Sims, Angela Richino and Matthew Vrvilo, with obstructing governmental administration, but that the Manhattan district attorney’s office had declined to prosecute them.

Now they are preparing to sue the city, Mr. Pawar said, adding that the arrests had violated their constitutional rights.

“Not only are the police disrupting people’s rights to free expression,” Mr. Pawar said. “They are taking pre-emptive steps by arresting people who might be just thinking about exercising their rights.”

Though Occupy Wall Street has largely faded from the headlines, organizers are planning springtime demonstrations in an effort to revitalize their movement. And they are troubled by what they consider continued monitoring by the police.

In 2003, citing the dangers of terrorism, a federal judge granted expanded surveillance powers to the New York police, who had previously faced restrictions in monitoring political groups. Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and others have said the new latitude is essential to keeping the city safe.

But the Police Department’s surveillance efforts have recently gained attention and criticism with reports that officers compiled detailed data on Muslim communities. Now, some Occupy protesters worry that they are being subjected to similar scrutiny.

For the last few months, protest organizers say, police officers or detectives have been posted outside buildings where private meetings were taking place, have visited the homes of organizers and have questioned protesters arrested on minor charges.

“The N.Y.P.D. surveillance does not appear to be limited to unlawful activity,” said Donna Lieberman, the executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union. “We count on the police, of course, to be on the lookout for terrorists and terrorism, but to think you could be on that continuum just by going to a peaceful protest is nuts.”

A police spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.

Undercover officers are generally entitled to attend public political gatherings. Protesters said apparent efforts to keep tabs on them had included officers’ showing up at private meetings and what some described as attempts at intimidation.

Ashley Cunningham, an Occupy organizer, said that on Dec. 16, officers parked outside her home in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, where people were discussing a demonstration planned for the next day.

Another organizer, Sandy Nurse, said she arrived at her apartment building in Bushwick, Brooklyn, on Dec. 16 and found uniformed officers outside who told her they were there to conduct a “security check” for a condition they would not identify.

Although she told them they could not enter, Ms. Nurse said, an officer used his foot to prevent the front door from closing behind her, followed her into the building’s entryway vestibule, and threatened to arrest her for obstruction of government administration. Ms. Nurse said the visit did not feel like a coincidence.

“It means that they are watching us,” she said. “They know who we are, where we live and where we are organizing.”

At various other points, organizers said, officers have posted themselves outside a building in the financial district where organizers were meeting, and stood in a hallway outside of an art studio in Dumbo, Brooklyn, where protesters were making signs and banners.

Several people charged with offenses like trespassing said detectives from the intelligence division questioned them, with other officers explaining that it was because of their connection to Occupy Wall Street.

Some of those questioned said the detectives seemed mainly interested in knowing about coming demonstrations. But sometimes, protesters and lawyers said, the questioning went further.

Mark Adams, a 32-year-old engineer from Virginia, said he was arrested in November at an Occupy Wall Street protest in Midtown and was questioned by a police detective and an agent from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, who asked about his involvement with Occupy Wall Street, requested his e-mail address and inquired whether he had ever been to Yemen or met anyone connected to Al Qaeda.

Mr. Adams, a naturalized United States citizen who was born in Pakistan, said he was arrested during another protest in January and questioned by intelligence division detectives. In that instance, he said, the detectives asked him about specific names and addresses, asked about his work history, education and family, and questioned him about a trip he had made to Ireland.

Mr. Adams said he was disturbed that anyone would consider him a threat because of his ethnicity or political views. “It’s scary,” he said.

http://www.nytimes.c...ng.html?_r=3

#1940 PeaceFrog

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 12:47 AM

Yeah the huge frown right at the start of the post would naturally give the reader a negative leaning perspective at the outset.

just saying... I mean... fair is fair.

#1941 capt_morgan

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 12:55 AM

wah

#1942 Joker

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 12:12 PM

riiiiight...i don't buy it or give a fuck about it

why the frown before the post if you were pointing out the positive?

And yet, once again, you're whining :dunno:

The frown was because someone was raped.

Maybe if you picture it being done by a mean policeman you'll get an idea how most normal people feel about someone getting raped. :dunno:

#1943 Joker

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 12:42 PM

Fucking cops suck :lol:

Police clear Nashville plaza but make no Occupy arrest

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP)

#1944 vic

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 01:23 PM

And yet, once again, you're whining :dunno:

The frown was because someone was raped.

Maybe if you picture it being done by a mean policeman you'll get an idea how most normal people feel about someone getting raped. :dunno:


suite backtrack.

derp.

#1945 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 01:46 PM



#1946 vic

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 02:22 PM


i would have been more interested to hear more than 2:50 of that with more points and counterpoints

#1947 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 02:33 PM

what points and what counter points?

#1948 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 02:40 PM

The professor is mostly right. Though, the label crony captialism is misleading. It is misleading because it gives room for interpretation that there is actual capitalism taking place, but it is corrupted by long standing friendships. This is a partial truth.

What is really happening is corporatism.

Capitalism doesn't exist without a free market. The minute central planning of a sector of the market happens, it cascades itself throughout the entire market in a "ripple effect".

#1949 Joker

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 06:14 PM

Hurt Occupy Oakland protester was hit by beanbag

Occupy Oakland demonstrator Scott Olsen was hit in the head by a beanbag projectile, not a teargas canister, fired by a policeman during a protest in October, Olsen's attorney said Wednesday.

"The fact that it was a beanbag shot, which was not what we thought, puts it in a completely different light," said Mark Martel, who is preparing to file a claim against Oakland. "If he was hit by a tear gas canister, that would just be stupid or negligent.

"But if it was a beanbag - those are meant to hit people, and it tells me that whoever did it, did it intentionally."

Martel said he was e-mailed confirmation of the beanbag shot two weeks ago by an Oakland Police Department investigator who is looking into the department's handling of the Occupy protests.

The attorney said videos showing Olsen, a former Marine and a member of Iraq Veterans Against the War, during the protest indicate that whoever shot him was within 30 feet.

"Because it was in close distance, it suggests this was an intentional shot to the head," Martel said.

Officer Johnna Watson, an Oakland police spokeswoman, declined to name the officer involved in Olsen's injury or to comment on the investigation. Probes of the Occupy protests are being conducted by the department's major crimes section as well as a private contractor, the Frazier Group, which is helping determine if any city employees should be fired or disciplined.

Olsen was injured Oct. 25 during a nighttime protest that erupted after police cleared an Occupy Oakland camp in front of City Hall.

He suffered a fractured skull that resulted in a brain injury and difficulty with speech. Whether that fracture was from the projectile or from falling after being hit is being investigated.



Read more: http://www.sfgate.co...L#ixzz1pD7JNfPb

#1950 vic

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 08:16 PM

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