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The Keystone Pipeline


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#1 Joker

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 03:46 PM

Keystone Pipeline


The Keystone Pipeline System is a pipeline system to transport crude oil from the Athabasca Oil Sands in northeastern Alberta, Canada to refineries in Illinois and Oklahoma, and further to the U.S. Gulf Coast. It consists of the operational "Keystone Pipeline" and proposed Keystone XL (Keystone Expansion) pipeline. Keystone XL has faced lawsuits from oil refineries, criticism from environmentalists and some members of the United States Congress. The U.S. Department of State in 2010 extended the deadline for federal agencies to decide if the pipeline is in the national interest.

History

Keystone Pipeline
TransCanada Corporation proposed the project on February 9, 2005. In October 2007, the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada asked the Canadian federal government to block regulatory approvals for the pipeline, with union president Dave Coles stating that "the Keystone pipeline will exclusively serve US markets, create permanent employment for very few Canadians, reduce our energy security, and hinder investment and job creation in the Canadian energy sector".[1] However, the National Energy Board of Canada approved the construction of the Canadian section of the pipeline, including converting a portion of TransCanada's Canadian Mainline gas pipeline to crude oil pipeline, on September 21, 2007.[2] On March 17, 2008, the U.S. Department of State issued a Presidential Permit authorizing the construction, maintenance and operation of facilities at the United States and Canada border.[3]

On January 22, 2008, ConocoPhillips acquired 50% stake in the project.[4] However, on June 17, 2009 it was agreed that TransCanada would buy out ConocoPhillips' share in the project and revert to being the sole owner.[5] It took TransCanada more than two years to acquire all the necessary state and federal permits for the pipeline. Construction took another two years.[6] The pipeline became operational in June 2010.[7]

Keystone XL
The Keystone XL extension was proposed in 2008.[8] The application was filed in the beginning of 2009 and the National Energy Board of Canada started hearings in September 2009.[9] It was approved by the National Energy Board on March 11, 2010.[10] The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission granted a permit on February 19, 2010.[11] However, in its March 2010 report, the Natural Resources Defense Council stated that "the Keystone XL Pipeline undermines the U.S. commitment to a clean energy economy", instead delivering dirty fuel from oil sands and high costs.[12]

On June 23, 2010, 50 Members of Congress spoke out against the Keystone XL pipeline. In their letter to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, they warned that "building this pipeline has the potential to undermine America's clean energy future and international leadership on climate change."[13][14] On July 6, 2010, House Energy and Commerce Committee chairman Henry Waxman urged the State Department to block Keystone XL, saying in a letter to the department that "this pipeline is a multi-billion dollar investment to expand our reliance on the dirtiest source of transportation fuel currently available".[15][16] On July 21, 2010, the Environmental Protection Agency said the draft environmental impact study for Keystone XL was inadequate and should be revised,[17][18] indicating that the State Department's original report was "unduly narrow" because it didn't fully look at oil spill response plans, safety issues and greenhouse gas concerns.[19] The final environmental impact report was released on August 26, 2011. It stated that the pipeline would pose "no significant impacts" to most resources if environmental protection measures are followed, but it would present "significant adverse effects to certain cultural resources". The final decision is expected by the end 2011.[20]


Criticisms

Environmental groups, concerned citizens, and politicians have raised a number of concerns about the Keystone XL extension. One concern is that the pipeline could pollute air and water supplies and harm migratory birds and other wildlife.[17] It will cross the Sandhills in Nebraska, the large wetland ecosystem, and the Ogallala Aquifer, one of the largest reserves of fresh water in the world.[32] The Ogallala Aquifer spans eight states, provides drinking water for two million people, and supports $20 billion in agriculture.[33] Critics are concerned that a major leak could ruin drinking water and devastate the mid-western U.S. economy.[34] Portions of the pipeline will also cross an active seismic zone that had a 4.3 magnitude earthquake as recently as 2002.[33] Opponents claim that TransCanada applied to the U.S. government to use thinner steel and pump at higher pressures than normal.[34]

Analysts believe that including the Alberta Clipper pipeline owned by TransCanada's competitor Enbridge, there is an extensive overcapacity of oil pipelines from Canada and after completion of the Keystone XL line oil pipelines to the U.S. will run nearly half-empty.[30] However, in its March 2010 report, the Natural Resources Defense Council stated that "the Keystone XL Pipeline undermines the U.S. commitment to a clean energy economy", instead delivering dirty fuel from oil sands and high costs.[12]

Opponents say that the pipeline will undermine America's clean energy future and increase its dependence of oil sands fuels.[15] TransCanada has answered these concerns saying that development of oil sands will expand regardless of where the crude oil is exported to the United States or alternatively to Asian markets through the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines or the Kinder Morgan's Trans-Mountain line.[35]

In December, 2010, No Tar Sands Oil campaign was launched. Sponsored by a number of action groups, including Corporate Ethics International, NRDC (Natural Resources Defense Council), Sierra Club, National Wildlife Federation, Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace, and Rainforest Action Network and featuring TV ads on CNN, MSNBC, and Comedy Central, the $500,000 US campaign[36] asked that people urge President Obama to stop the Keystone XL pipeline from being built by visiting The National Wildlife Federation website.

According to the National Wildlife Federation Action Fund, the President and US Department have the power to require an additional Environmental Impact Assessment. Members of Congress and the EPA requested this measure be taken.[37]

Concerns of bad sections of pipe using defective steel are causing areas of Keystone to be excavated and checked. PHMSA had earlier sent out warnings about some pipe swelling under pressure.[38]

In Kansas, local officials along the pipeline's path think that the state sold them out unnecessarily to get the pipeline. Due to an exemption the state gave Alberta-based TransCanada, the local officials won't see any revenue from property taxes from the project for a decade, a loss they estimate at $50 million in public revenue.[19]

On August 21, 2011, the New York Times published an editorial opposing the Keystone XL pipeline because of the additional greenhouse gas emissions and the probability of oil spills in sensitive areas.[39]

More
http://en.wikipedia....ystone_Pipeline

#2 Joker

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 03:31 PM

Picture of the day: activists rally at White House against tar sands pipeline


A two week long civil action is taking place in front of the White House in an attempt to convince the Obama Administration to turn down the Keystone Pipeline XL, which would bring oil from Alberta's tar sands to the US market. Protestors are opposed to the pipeline for a number of reasons, including potential oil spills. However, the main reason is that the tar sands carry a bigger carbon burden than conventional oil, exacerbating the global climate crisis. Many environmentalists have come to see the tar sands pipeline as a test to the Obama Administration's willingness to address climate change after years of disappointment.

To date 381 people have been arrested in the protest. Activists are intentionally, but peacefully, trespassing as an act of civil disobedience. Those arrested to date have included influential environmental leader and head of 350.org, Bill McKibben. Climatologist James Hansen is expected to protest tomorrow and risk arrest.

http://news.mongabay...rsands-pod.html

#3 unbroken_chain

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 09:15 PM

sorry I thought this was some poke at the fine beer I like to pour down my throat.

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#4 Joker

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 01:36 PM

Keith? Keith Stone? :undecided:




Group Plans to Expand Keystone XL Pipeline

After finishing construction of the Keystone XL pipeline that runs from Canada through the Midwest, the pipeline is ready for another expansion.

Several entities, including groups from North Dakota, are supporting a plan to expand the Keystone XL pipeline through Montana, South Dakota and Nebraska.

The group "Partnership to Fuel America" says the expansion would bring thousands of jobs to the area and would reduce country`s dependence on foreign oil.

"People understand that. They also understand the job impact. They`re able to see in these tough times throughout the US, North Dakota`s kind of unique. We have low unemployment, but we`d like to see a lot of development throughout the rest of the country, certainly a more stable supply will help them," said Matthew Koch, with the Institute for 21st Century Energy.

The oil is drilled and pumped from the Oil Sands Formation in Alberta.

The Keystone XL pipeline runs through the eastern half of North Dakota before ending up in both Oklahoma and Illinois.

http://www.kfyrtv.co....asp?news=51966

#5 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 01:39 PM

The Koch's will win too.

#6 Joker

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 02:22 PM

Keystone XL Is Self-Destructive. Does the Obama Administration Need to Be Also?

So many thoughts after today

#7 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 03:05 PM

The Koch's will win too.


:wink:

Moving away from the high grade black tar, to the dirty, dirty sandy tar.
We need our fix, brah!

#8 Joker

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 03:16 PM

Most likely they will but there's plenty of people out there in the US and Canada that are still protesting. :heart:

Maine Groups Protest Canadian "Tar Sands" Project
08/31/2011 Reported By: Susan Sharon

Protests against a planned 1,600-mile pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Canada to Texas refineries continue for a second week at the White House, where more than 600 people have been arrested. The protestors want President Obama to deny a federal permit for TransCanada's Keystone XL project that would cross through several Western states and could put the nation's largest aquifer in Nebraska at risk for contamination. Meanwhile, the Natural Resources Council of Maine and several other environmental groups are warning of a related pipeline project that they say could make Portland, Maine, "the tar sands capital" of the Eastern United States.

The Natural Resources Council of Maine joined the Vermont Natural Resources Council and three Canadian environmental groups in asking the National Energy Board in Canada to deny a request from oil and gas giant Enbridge, Inc. to reverse the flow of crude oil in a portion of a pipeline that could eventually deliver crude oil from tar sands in Alberta, Canada, all the way to Portland, Maine.

"The tar sands is landlocked. It's one of the largest, most destructive environmental energy projects on the planet right now," says Pete Didisheim, the advocacy director for the Natural Resources Council of Maine. He says the tar sands are a geological formation under a very large boreal forest that has to be strip-mined in order to get the oil out.

"The oil is hard to extract and it's very dirty, and it's causing widespread environmental damage in Alberta," Didisheim says. "And the strategy is to get that oil into pipelines to refineries so that it can then get out on the global market and make the world more dependent on this particularly environmentally destructive form of oil."

More
http://www.mpbn.net/...42/Default.aspx

#9 lilphlower

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 03:31 PM

i am about to go get myself arrested. i cant even fathom these pipelines being a good idea. i am def not that well informed about it, admittedly. is there a reason, first of all, that we cant just build a refinery like right in washington or maine??? not that i would support that neccessarily, im just curious....

#10 Joker

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 03:49 PM

I was unaware of this myself until the other day. All I can see is that it might have to do with the location of the refineries


(from the Wiki link)

Route

The 3,456 kilometres (2,147 mi) long pipeline will transport crude oil from Hardisty, Alberta to the United States refineries in Wood River, Illinois and Patoka, Illinois.[21] The Canadian section involves approximately 864 kilometres (537 mi) of pipeline converted from the Canadian Mainline natural gas pipeline and 373 kilometres (232 mi) of new pipeline, pump stations and terminal facilities at Hardisty, Alberta. The United States section is 2,219 kilometres (1,379 mi) long.[22] It runs through Buchanan, Clinton and Caldwell counties in Missouri, and Nemaha, Brown and Doniphan counties in Kansas.[7] In Jefferson County, Nebraska, a 291 miles (468 km) long extension would take the pipeline to the oil hub in Cushing, Oklahoma.[23]

The 3,190 kilometres (1,980 mi) long Keystone XL starts from the same area in Alberta as the main pipeline.[8] The Canadian section will consist of 529 kilometres (329 mi) of new pipeline.[10] It joins the main Keystone Pipeline at Steele City, Nebraska. From there it runs parallel to the Cushing extensions.[8] From Cushing, it would be expanded to Port Arthur, Texas, and Houston, Texas. The pipeline will reach to Illinois in late 2009, to Oklahoma in late 2010, and to Texas in 2012.[24] TransCanada says the pipeline will later be expanded to reach refineries in the USA Gulf Coast.[25]

#11 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 12:52 PM

Arrested at the White House


Acting as a Living Tribute to Martin Luther King
By Bill McKibben

I didn’t think it was possible, but my admiration for Martin Luther King, Jr., grew even stronger these past days.

As I headed to jail as part of the first wave of what is turning into the biggest civil disobedience action in the environmental movement for many years, I had the vague idea that I would write something. Not an epic like King's Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” but at least, you know, a blog post. Or a tweet.


But frankly, I wasn’t up to it. The police, surprised by how many people turned out on the first day of two weeks of protests at the White House, decided to teach us a lesson. As they told our legal team, they wanted to deter anyone else from coming -- and so with our first crew they were… kind of harsh.

We spent three days in D.C.’s Central Cell Block, which is exactly as much fun as it sounds like it might be. You lie on a metal rack with no mattress or bedding and sweat in the high heat; the din is incessant; there’s one baloney sandwich with a cup of water every 12 hours.

I didn’t have a pencil -- they wouldn’t even let me keep my wedding ring -- but more important, I didn’t have the peace of mind to write something. It’s only now, out 12 hours and with a good night’s sleep under my belt, that I’m able to think straight. And so, as I said, I’ll go to this weekend’s big celebrations for the opening of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial on the Washington Mall with even more respect for his calm power.

Preacher, speaker, writer under fire, but also tactician. He really understood the power of nonviolence, a power we’ve experienced in the last few days. When the police cracked down on us, the publicity it produced cemented two of the main purposes of our protest:

First, it made Keystone XL -- the new, 1,700-mile-long pipeline we’re trying to block that will vastly increase the flow of “dirty” tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada, to the Gulf of Mexico -- into a national issue. A few months ago, it was mainly people along the route of the prospective pipeline who were organizing against it. (And with good reason: tar sands mining has already wrecked huge swaths of native land in Alberta, and endangers farms, wild areas, and aquifers all along its prospective route.)

Now, however, people are coming to understand -- as we hoped our demonstrations would highlight -- that it poses a danger to the whole planet as well. After all, it’s the Earth’s second largest pool of carbon, and hence the second-largest potential source of global warming gases after the oil fields of Saudi Arabia. We’ve already plumbed those Saudi deserts. Now the question is: Will we do the same to the boreal forests of Canada. As NASA climatologist James Hansen has made all too clear, if we do so it’s “essentially game over for the climate.” That message is getting through. Witness the incredibly strong New York Times editorial opposing the building of the pipeline that I was handed on our release from jail.

Second, being arrested in front of the White House helped make it clearer that President Obama should be the focus of anti-pipeline activism. For once Congress isn’t in the picture. The situation couldn’t be simpler: the president, and the president alone, has the power either to sign the permit that would take the pipeline through the Midwest and down to Texas (with the usual set of disastrous oil spills to come) or block it.

Barack Obama has the power to stop it and no one in Congress or elsewhere can prevent him from doing so. That means -- and again, it couldn’t be simpler -- that the Keystone XL decision is the biggest environmental test for him between now and the next election. If he decides to stand up to the power of big oil, it will send a jolt through his political base, reminding the presently discouraged exactly why they were so enthused in 2008.

That’s why many of us were wearing our old campaign buttons when we went into the paddy wagon. We’d like to remember -- and like the White House to remember, too -- just why we knocked on all those doors.

But as Dr. King might have predicted, the message went deeper. As people gather in Washington for this weekend’s dedication of his monument, most will be talking about him as a great orator, a great moral leader. And of course he was that, but it’s easily forgotten what a great strategist he was as well, because he understood just how powerful a weapon nonviolence can be.

The police, who trust the logic of force, never quite seem to get this. When they arrested our group of 70 or so on the first day of our demonstrations, they decided to teach us a lesson by keeping us locked up extra long -- strong treatment for a group of people peacefully standing on a sidewalk.

No surprise, it didn’t work. The next day an even bigger crowd showed up -- and now, there are throngs of people who have signed up to be arrested every day until the protests end on September 3rd. Not only that, a judge threw out the charges against our first group, and so the police have backed off. For the moment, anyway, they’re not actually sending more protesters to jail, just booking and fining them.

And so the busload of ranchers coming from Nebraska, and the bio-fueled RV with the giant logo heading in from East Texas, and the flight of grandmothers arriving from Montana, and the tribal chiefs, and union leaders, and everyone else will keep pouring into D.C. We’ll all, I imagine, stop and pay tribute to Dr. King before or after we get arrested; it’s his lead, after all, that we’re following.

Our part in the weekend’s celebration is to act as a kind of living tribute. While people are up on the mall at the monument, we’ll be in the front of the White House, wearing handcuffs, making clear that civil disobedience is not just history in America.

We may not be facing the same dangers Dr. King did, but we’re getting some small sense of the kind of courage he and the rest of the civil rights movement had to display in their day -- the courage to put your body where your beliefs are. It feels good.

Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, founder of 350.org, and a TomDispatch regular. His most recent book, just out in paperback, is Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet.

#12 Spidergawd

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 12:59 PM

Gee, it will be just awesome to have this stupid thing practically running through our back yard here in Northern Illinois. I can almost smell the environmental destruction now...

#13 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 01:04 PM

A lot of awareness about this project is being shed. Let's hope we can get a few pennies of the change we voted for.

#14 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 01:07 PM

i am about to go get myself arrested. i cant even fathom these pipelines being a good idea. i am def not that well informed about it, admittedly. is there a reason, first of all, that we cant just build a refinery like right in washington or maine??? not that i would support that neccessarily, im just curious....



I imagine that they want to use refineries that already exist rather than spend money building new ones in places that will likely fight against them being built - it's an ugly process no matter how you slice it, lots of health hazards for the environment and all living creatures, but we need oil to keep things running, so... :undecided: I guess the expense and hazards of building a pipeline outweigh the costs of building a refinery that is closer to the source of the crude material.

#15 Joker

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 02:04 PM

Key Facts on Keystone XL

Energy Security: Tar Sand will not Reduce Dependence on Foreign Oil

Keystone XL will not lessen U.S. dependence on foreign oil, but transport Canadian oil to American refineries for export to overseas markets.

Keystone XL is an export pipeline. According to presentations to investors, Gulf Coast refiners plan to refine the cheap Canadian crude supplied by the pipeline into diesel and other products for export to Europe and Latin America. Proceeds from these exports are earned tax-free. Much of the fuel refined from the pipeline

#16 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 03:39 PM

Asking for What Obama Promised
Protesters push Obama to resist the influence of the oil industry and stop the Keystone XL pipeline


It’s hard to get away from corporations’ influence in Washington, D.C. Even at the new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial this weekend, I noted that the sponsors list, etched on a stone wall, was a litany of the most recognizable corporate heavy-hitters—including Walmart, ExxonMobil, Fannie Mae, Lehman Brothers, PepsiCo, and BP. An ironic tribute to a man who openly questioned capitalism and the deep gap between rich and poor.

In the American tradition of civil disobedience, the pipeline protesters call their arrests an act of good citizenship. (Photo by Josh Lopez)
Over the past two days, I watched more than 200 people get arrested in protests that are attempting to push back against the oil industry’s influence on a key decision that President Obama is about to make. In total, there have been more than 700 arrests since the demonstrations began. In their signs and speeches, the protesters draw self-consciously on King’s legacy of civil disobedience, but many are not seasoned activists. Most of the people I met at the White House gates were core supporters of Obama in 2008. They put their weight and energy into Obama’s campaign, knocking on doors to deliver him a landslide. Three years later, they are angry and frustrated with the president.

“I worked harder for his election than I have for any other president, and I feel as though he has let us down.”The protests focus on stopping the 1,700-mile Keystone XL pipeline, which would run from Canada to Texas and allow major oil companies to ramp up Alberta tar sands production, refinement, and export. NASA scientist James Hansen, who was arrested at Monday’s protest, says that exploiting Canada’s vast tar sands reserves for fuel would ultimately be “game over” for climate change—no chance of reducing emissions in time to avert disaster. A cable unearthed by WikiLeaks suggests the administration is predisposed to sign off on Keystone XL. Many of the protesters would see such a decision as a betrayal.

“I worked harder for his election than I have for any other president, and I feel as though he has let us down,” said Barbara Schlachter, an Episcopal priest from Iowa, who joined the protest a few days after her grandson’s birth. She had never been arrested before. She expressed a mix of hope and cynicism about Obama. “I think that big oil and big coal have essentially bought Congress and the president.”

I met a 56-year-old from rural North Carolina who had never registered to vote until three years ago, when she cast her first ballot for Obama. She said she still “loved the man” but felt the president was under tremendous pressure. And I spoke with a retired medical journalist from Haines, Alaska, who had three years ago made a return visit to Philadelphia, his hometown, to join Obama’s presidential campaign. “I’m totally pissed off,” he said. “All these volunteers that I was working with—we had a vision for how it was going to be. So I’m sure there are thousands and thousands of people like me who want Obama to do a 180-degree change on where he’s going.”

Each morning a group of protesters walks in two solemn lines toward the White House gates and allows themselves to be rounded up by police. The activists hail from every region of the country. Celebrities and environmental leaders have joined the demonstrations. On Monday, a gathering of preachers, rabbis, and other faith leaders participated. They sang spirituals from the civil rights era as they were handcuffed.

On Tuesday, actor Daryl Hannah joined those arrested. I found her crouched below a tree, coloring in a “No Keystone XL” poster minutes before the protest. “We have the option of having American-made, community-based, renewable clean energy like solar, wind, and geothermal—this is part of Obama’s campaign promise,” she said. “This is his chance to step up to the plate. This is a true test of whether he’s going to be the president he promised to be.”

The protests are beginning to win major national and international press coverage, and Obama would do well to take the demonstrators seriously.Bill McKibben, the lead organizer of this demonstration, has kept the tone civil. The demonstrators pledge to remain “dignified in dress and demeanor.” No one resists or heckles the police. Most of the activists I met were breaking the law for the first time. They resist caricature. No one shouted, “Get a job!” at the 32-year-old consultant in heels and a tailored skirt or the Jesuit priest in religious regalia. Some activists broke into tears as the police carted them away.

Granted, it’s unlikely that most of these activists would support a Republican candidate—such as climate-denier Rick Perry—for office. But it’s not merely their votes that helped Obama win: His first campaign ignited thousands of people to organize “get out the vote” activities, bringing millions to polls. It’s not yet possible to make grandiose claims about whether Obama's environmental record could seriously affect his candidacy. But it looks like these protests are channeling angst and frustration not from the fringe but from a group of people at the center of Obama’s base. The protests are beginning to win major national and international press coverage, and Obama would do well to take the demonstrators seriously.

The demonstrators emerge every day from the police station in the neighborhood of Anacostia. They applaud one another as they arrive in a gravel parking lot where organizers meet them with water and granola bars. It feels like the finish line of a sporting event.

On Monday, I traveled to meet the protesters there. Jennifer Bielawski, a 46-year-old from Columbus, Ohio, trembled as she spoke after her arrest. “There are a lot of pissed-off voters here,” she said. “I don’t consider myself particularly political. Like a lot of people I don’t like to inconvenience myself, so to pay for airfare and a hotel room, I really had to be committed to it.” But she was inspired by the number of ordinary people who were willing to participate. “I thought, ‘Get off your lazy butt and go do something. If they can do it, I can.’”

“What we need is the next time to come back with so many people that they can’t arrest us." -James HansenClimate scientist James Hansen was one of the last to be released that day. Wearing a brown fedora hat tipped sideways and a gray suit that had developed several wrinkles, he looked a bit like Indiana Jones. Earlier, during a speech before the protest, Hansen had issued a warning to Obama: “Have no doubt that if the tar sands pipeline is approved, we will be back and our numbers will grow … We must find [a president] who is worthy of our dreams.”

After his arrest, Hansen seemed invigorated. He said he had driven all night on Friday to be sure that Hurricane Irene wouldn’t stop him from participating in the demonstrations. “What we need is the next time to come back with so many people that they can’t arrest us,” he said.

#17 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 03:47 PM

Apparently this is now in a 90 day review cycle and we are expected to have an answer on whether the project will pass by year end.

Over/under on Obrahma passing it through?


I've got 5 on it.... :huh:

#18 Joker

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 04:10 PM

There will be enough shit going on regarding the final budget around that time that this will slip through

ooh shiny'd

#19 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 04:23 PM

Ooohhhh Ahhhh....look, shiny and glittery. :gop:

I'll have my eyes on this. I've already sign'd up for emails on the subject. If Obrahma passes this, I swear to fucking god I will watch everyone vote for him with far less enthusiasm this time around. :funny1:

#20 Joker

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 04:28 PM

You're such a badass :mrgreen:

#21 Joker

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 09:03 PM

Final Day Of Keystone XL Protest: Over 1,000 Arrested

Today marks the final day of the Tar Sands Action, a two week-long protest of the Keystone XL oil pipeline that took place outside the White House in Washington, D.C.
Although the State Department gave the project it

#22 china cat

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Posted 06 September 2011 - 12:01 AM

[quote name='Joker']Key Facts on Keystone XL

Energy Security: Tar Sand will not Reduce Dependence on Foreign Oil

Keystone XL will not lessen U.S. dependence on foreign oil, but transport Canadian oil to American refineries for export to overseas markets.

Keystone XL is an export pipeline. According to presentations to investors, Gulf Coast refiners plan to refine the cheap Canadian crude supplied by the pipeline into diesel and other products for export to Europe and Latin America. Proceeds from these exports are earned tax-free. Much of the fuel refined from the pipeline

#23 Julius

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Posted 06 September 2011 - 01:43 PM

I oppose Keystone on pure energy policy grounds. The environmental argument is specious since any pipeline you build is going to have its own issues too and you can't just not build pipelines.

What we need to focus on is how to get WTI crude from Cushing to the coastal refineries, Canadian oil is pretty irrelevant until we get that problem solved.

#24 Julius

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Posted 06 September 2011 - 01:49 PM

and what the environmental propagandists fail to acknowledge is that pipelines pretty much have an "off" switch that contains the damage from disasters, especially when you compare it to the amount of crude that would be dumped into the oceans if a Panamax tanker, or God forbid a ULCC tanker had a problem.

#25 Julius

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Posted 06 September 2011 - 02:00 PM

OK, to simplify: We're awash in oil but it's all stuck in Cushing OK with no good way to get it to US refineries. So why the hell would you build a pipeline to get even MORE oil to where we already have too much?

#26 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 06 September 2011 - 02:07 PM

To raise gas prices, raise the potential for disasters and ruin the envionment more in the name of profit? :dunno:

#27 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 08 September 2011 - 02:19 PM

The Koch's will win too.


The Kochs' Keystone clique exposed

Only the Koch brothers' club of billionaires and political cronies will profit if the Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline goes ahead




Charles Koch, one of our country's most prolific conservative donors, was recorded praising his oil, energy and Wall Street friends who contributed millions of dollars to his political causes. That Koch likely referred to President Obama as Saddam Hussein and framed the upcoming election as the "mother of all wars" overshadowed the real news.

These are the disclosures from the Koch brothers' secret strategy sessions. The recording at the centre of the controversy was taken from the most recent Koch seminar in June

#28 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 08 September 2011 - 02:20 PM

If President Obama and Secretary Clinton greenlight the Keystone XL pipeline, they'll be directly benefiting the Koch brothers, who are two of their fiercest adversaries.


Now begs the question - why would they do such a thing? Hmmmm.....

#29 vic

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Posted 08 September 2011 - 03:35 PM

same team'd

#30 Joker

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 06:38 PM

Nobel winners join fight against pipeline

Letter calls on U.S. president 'to make good' on his clean-energy pledge


BY MIKE DE SOUZA AND JASON FEKETE, POSTMEDIA NEWS SEPTEMBER 8, 2011



The Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and seven other Nobel Peace laureates have joined groups opposing the approval of a controversial pipeline expansion project that would carry more crude oil from Alberta to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast.

In a letter released Wednesday, the nine individuals made a personal appeal to U.S. President Barack Obama to reject the project and focus instead on promoting renewable energy in order to reduce consumption of fossil fuels that contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming.

"It is your decision to make," said the letter. "The night you were nominated president, you told the world that under your leadership - and working together - the rise of the oceans will begin to slow and the planet will begin to heal. You spoke of creating a clean-energy economy. This is a critical moment to make good on that pledge, and make a lasting contribution to the health and well being of everyone of this planet."

The letter highlighted protests at the White House in recent weeks about the project that have prompted more than 1,200 arrests, including highprofile protesters such as NASA climate scientist James Hansen and actress Daryl Hannah.

"These brave individuals have spoken movingly about experiencing the power of nonviolence in facing authority," said the letter. "They represent millions of people whose lives and livelihoods will be affected by construction and operation of the pipeline in Alberta, Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas."

It also said the company proposing the project, TransCanada, has had problems with its existing Keystone pipeline with 14 reported leaks after only one year of operation.

But federal Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver noted Wednesday that the U.S. State Department had not expressed concerns about environmental risks of the project in its last assessment. "We all know the enormous economic benefit of it. I'm not taking anything for granted. We respect, of course, the decision-making process in the United States," Oliver told reporters as he announced a new federal spending program to promote energy efficiency.



Read more: http://www.vancouver...l#ixzz1XZmvWHxB

#31 freerange

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 07:18 PM

Joker why do you hate Canada?

#32 china cat

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 09:15 PM

:lol:

#33 jagermonster

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 09:52 AM

..says the people that drive everywhere....

#34 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 12:45 PM

I dont even own a car, breh. :undecided:

#35 Joker

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 01:13 PM

Joker why do you hate Canada?

It all started with Rush

#36 china cat

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 03:21 PM

..says the people that drive everywhere....


but we lack the infrastructure to reduce the amount of cars on the road.

how about getting out of the middle east and putting that money toward jobs here building a mass transit system.

and we also need car manufacturers to step it up and begin creating more forward thinking vehicles.



#37 freerange

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 03:27 PM

its funny even with far more left leaning social structures in place up here
we are even more car dependant than the u.s.
geography and oil reliance has left our train infrastructure a mess
but the time we go with high speed rail up here it will be too late by decades

#38 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 05:35 PM

but we lack the infrastructure to reduce the amount of cars on the road.


Used to have lots of rail lines. Alas, so many have been torn up. I love travelling by train, I wish it were a more available mode of transport here in North America.

#39 Joker

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 05:32 PM

New Cornell Global Labor Institute report shows that the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline is not the path to economic security

This evening, President Obama spoke to the nation about jobs and confirmed that he will not let the economic crisis be used to roll back environmental protections. Hopefully that commitment can translate into increased incentives for clean energy jobs and push back against dirty energy claims that we need to sacrifice our health and environment for jobs. Today, a new * report by the Cornell Global Labor Institute * made it clear that the proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline would not provide the job and economic security that its proponents have been claiming. Clean energy jobs are the real long-term, secure jobs choice, not dirty energy such as tar sands.

Since he first took office, President Obama has brought jobs and environment together in a way that will lead towards economic prosperity: by putting American ingenuity to work to build a clean energy economy. However, in the wake of the President

#40 Joker

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 02:18 PM

Conflict of interest with Keystone XL?

WASHINGTON, Sept. 28 (UPI) -- An environmental advocacy group said it had evidence of a conflict of interest between Washington and the company behind the controversial Keystone XL pipeline.

Friends of Earth, the Center for International Environmental Law and Corporate Ethics International in May filed suit in a San Francisco court seeking documents related to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's communications with Paul Elliott.

Elliott is a former campaign manager for Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign and is now lobbyist for TransCanada, the corporate entity behind the Keystone pipeline.

Friends of Earth said it has documents that provide evidence of bias in the State Department's review of the Keystone XL pipeline.

"It's also clear that Elliott enjoyed a cozy relationship with State Department employees and sought to exploit his campaign ties to secure high-level meetings," Friends of Earth said.

"The correspondence confirms that Elliott was lobbying (the State Department) aggressively as early as June 2009 even though he did not register as a federal lobbyist until after news organizations reported on his unregistered lobbying in December 2010."

The State Department needs to approve the pipeline because it would cross the Canadian border with the United States. It would carry oil from tar sands projects in Alberta, Canada, to refiners in the southern U.S. coast. Critics said that type of oil poses environmental risks.

The State Department had said it didn't find a significant risk from the pipeline. It had said it "is not, and will not, be influenced by prior relationships that current government officials have had."



Read more: http://www.upi.com/B.../#ixzz1ZLpcdYPf

#41 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 02:32 PM

Nothing new there. And yet there are those out there that are persistant that the democratic party are the good guys and would never compromise their integrity by conducting unethical practices for personal and political gains. :rolleyes:

#42 Jabadoodle

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 10:53 AM

i am def not that well informed about it, admittedly. is there a reason, first of all, that we cant just build a refinery like right in washington or maine??? not that i would support that neccessarily, im just curious....



This podcast is helpful for understanding many sides of the issues,
including why they don't just build a refinery closer to the source. Click the
Listen To This Show button at the top of the page to stream it or download
as a podcast.

It has both opponents and proponents moderated by Tom Ashbrook
of Boston's NPR station, WBUR. Show is from September 7, 2011.


#43 Jabadoodle

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 10:55 AM


Map of what we're talking about...


Posted Image

#44 freerange

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 07:13 PM

transcanada's application for permits have run out
they will need to reapply and go through the entire process again
that is unless harperland fast tracks the tar to u.s. refineries
and canadian jobs

#45 Joker

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 07:27 PM

:lol:

This thread has been going for 6 weeks and NOW it gets moved?

There's plenty more threads over there that are far more political than this one but I'm sure you already know that.

#46 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 07:28 PM

Look, Jack. Shiny!!! :gop:



:rotf:

#47 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 12:58 PM

Joker check the guardian today for a great story on keystone. Id link and paste buts its real hard on this phone...... it exploits the koch bros and govt.

#48 Joker

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 09:42 PM

Thanks, I think :shocked:

Koch company declared 'substantial interest' in Keystone XL pipeline
Document filed with Canada's Energy Board appears to cast doubt on claims by Koch Industries that it has no interest in the controversial pipeline


In recent months Koch Industries Inc., the business conglomerate run by billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch, has repeatedly told a U.S. Congressional committee and the news media that the proposed Keystone XL oil sands pipeline has "nothing to do with any of our businesses."

But the company has told Canadian energy regulators a different story.

In 2009, Flint Hills Resources Canada LP, an Alberta-based subsidiary of Koch Industries, applied for

#49 DancingBearly

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 10:30 PM

Got this email today




Deadline Friday: Tell the State Department to reject Keystone XL.

Submit a comment to call-out the State Department's corrupt and biased process.

The State Department has consistently exhibited a pro-pipeline bias. Submit a final public comment to call it out and to and send a strong message to President Obama to reject Keystone XL.


Dear Shawn,

We've suspected for quite a while that the State Department was biased towards approving the Keystone XL pipeline.1

But if there was any remaining doubt, it has been shattered.

Evidence is piling up that the State Department has maintained a corrupt and biased "review" process, including cozy ties between State Department officials and TransCanada lobbyists, and — incredibly — allowing a company employed by TransCanada to conduct the environmental review and public hearing processes.

The State Department is accepting final public comments on the Keystone XL pipeline until Friday. We need a flood of comments to call out their blatant bias, and send a strong message to President Obama to reject this project.

Submit a public comment to call-out the State Department's pro-pipeline bias.

The Keystone XL Pipeline asks America to endure great risks in a desperate attempt to maintain our reliance on damaging fossil fuels.

But rather than conducting a thorough, good-faith review of this dangerous project, in a stunning conflict of interest, the State Department handed over the environmental review and public hearing process to a company called CARDNO Entrix, a contractor literally working for pipeline developer TransCanada!2

Cardno ENTRIX worked previously for BP to conduct the environmental review of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig that exploded in the gulf last year.3

Since the Bush Administration, Cardno ENTRIX has been working on behalf of the State Department to evaluate Keystone XL. Their woefully inadequate inadequate environmental review of the project was finalized by the State Department a few weeks ago, despite the EPA raising numerous concerns and warning that the review was "insufficient."4

Their so-called "State Department hearings" were similarly biased. According to numerous reports from the more than 300 CREDO members who attended the hearings, and many other activists, the Cardno ENTRIX representatives running the public hearings consistently gave the first few hours of speaking spots to oil-industry workers who were bussed in from out-of-state, and were paid to wait in line starting early in the morning. Only when pipeline opponents began speaking, did the moderators start enforcing stricter time limits.

An 85-year-old CREDO Activist had to go home after waiting for five hours at the Lincoln, Nebraska hearing, and never had the opportunity to speak. She wrote us that "It was the poorest excuse for a hearing I've ever witnessed." According to another participant at the hearing in Austin "This was not a hearing, this was a farce."5

This bias has pervaded the entire Keystone XL process. But it's still up to President Obama, and we need to send him a strong message now on the illegitimacy of the State Department's review.

Submit a public comment to send a message to President Obama and call out the stunning conflict of interest in the Keystone XL review process.

On top of all of this, numerous emails released by our friends at Friends of the Earth reveal shockingly cozy relationships between State Department officials and lobbyists for the Canadian pipeline company TransCanada.

One of the lobbyists is a man named Paul Elliot, who previously served as the Deputy Campaign Manager on Hillary Clinton's 2008 Presidential campaign. State Department officials cheered Elliot on as he convinced one Senator to endorse the pipeline project,6 and even appear to have coached Elliot and other TransCanada staff about how to build their case for approval, and even how to respond to questions and concerns about pipeline safety and environmental impact.7

The State Department has a solemn obligation to the people of this country to conduct an impartial evaluation of the impacts of this pipeline. Instead, officials appear to be acting in cahoots with the foreign company they are supposed to be evaluating.

Even if the State Department drops the ball, President Obama still has the power to lead. This final public comment period is a crucial opportunity to show that the State Department is working for TransCanada's interest, not our national interest — and send a message that this pipeline must be rejected.

Submit a public comment now to say the Keystone XL Pipeline is not in our national interest.

Thanks for fighting Keystone XL.

Elijah Zarlin, Campaign Manager
CREDO Action from Working Assets

1. Hillary Clinton's comments did refer to Keystone XL pipeline Journal Star, October 21, 2010.
2. State Department Keystone XL Hearings Run By TransCanada Contractor Think Progress, September 28, 2011.
3. Entrix, TransCanada and the State Department: The Fox is Guarding the Hen House Bold Nebraska.
4. EPA: State Department Analysis Of Keystone XL Tar Sands Pipeline Oil Spill, Global Warming Risks Is 'Insufficient' Think Progress, June 7, 2011.
5. Austin Tar Sands Hearing a Farce Public Citizen Texas, September 29, 2011.
6. New Keystone XL Emails Expose Corrupt Process Think Progress, October 3, 2011.
7. TransCanada pipeline lobbyist works all the angles with former colleagues The Washington Post, September 23, 2011.



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#50 china cat

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 12:42 AM

Obama Campaign Hires Keystone XL Pipeline Lobbyist



http://www.alternet....eline_lobbyist/