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Philip Seymour Hoffman - RIP


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#1 Depends

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 06:51 PM

No details.

 

He played a good Lester Bangs in Almost Famous....

 



#2 hippieskichick

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 07:02 PM

:sad:

 

 

JUST saw this on bookface. That really sucks. He was an amazing actor. 



#3 Tabbooma

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 07:12 PM


<3



#4 Depends

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 07:34 PM

23 years sober, and died with a needle in his arm...  too sad



#5 Lemireacle

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 07:40 PM

Such a shame! :sad:

#6 Tim the Beek

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 07:43 PM

:( <3



#7 insolent cur

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 07:45 PM

RIP.  Very sad indeed.

 

It's said that you can cheat death 1000 times...but death only needs to win once.

 

 

http://www.slate.com..._apartment.html

 

Oscar-winning actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead in his Manhattan apartment on Sunday afternoon, according to the Wall Street Journal and the New York Post, both of which source the news to unnamed law-enforcement officials. The New York Post says cops are attributing the death to “an apparent drug overdose” that took place inside the 46-year-old actor's Greenwich Village apartment. The Wall Street Journal only says officials are still investigating the cause of death.

 

Hoffman had been quite open about his battles with substance abuse explaining to TMZ last year that he had struggled with drugs in his early 20s but kicked the habit for two decades. Hoffman said he relapsed in 2012, starting with pills and escalating to snorting heroin, which is when he realized he had a problem. Hoffman reportedly only snorted heroin for about a week before realizing he needed help and checked himself into a rehab clinic in May of last year.

 

In January, 2006, Slate’s Meghan O’Rourke interviewed Hoffman after he was nominated for an Academy Award for his portrayal of Truman Capote. He won the Oscar.



#8 gregoir

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 07:54 PM

Very sad when someone succumbs to their demons.  If you haven't seen his film.  Love Liza I highly suggest checking it out.  It is a beautiful film about grief and substance abuse.  One of my favorites.



#9 tyedyedee

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 08:35 PM

loved him...stupid effing drug :bang:



#10 smagnolia

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:14 PM

What a waste~

#11 Depends

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 04:08 AM

Very sad when someone succumbs to their demons.  If you haven't seen his film.  Love Liza I highly suggest checking it out.  It is a beautiful film about grief and substance abuse.  One of my favorites.

Great movie...



#12 china cat

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 04:40 AM

Just heard about this film, looking forward to it

 

http://www.amazon.co...uct/B001ROXGTK#



#13 china cat

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 04:42 AM

He was also great (small role) in this film.

 

 



#14 gregoir

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 05:38 AM

It's not just the drugs, it's demons, living your life how people expect you too.  I'm really happy I was born 10 years later into a more understanding world.  not perfect but better



#15 Terrapin Station

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 01:37 PM

Sad stuff. He might have got that bad batch that killed 22 people in Pittsburgh last week. Can't fight with the devil and win them all. :sad:

#16 hippieskichick

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:00 PM

loved him...stupid effing drug :bang:

 

 

I'm trying not to get irate at people who keep jumping on the 'junkie' bandwagon. 

 

I've read countless comments about how "he did this to himself" and "he had a choice, he had the control" and I want to punch them. 

 

Anyone who's ever felt the grasp of heroin knows that you don't have control, it controls you. Sometimes forever. I know folks who have been addicted to this or that, and even if it's been years since they've drank/got high/etc, they say they still feel the urge, all the time. Heroin is arguably the worst one to leave that forever hook in you. 

 

Frustrating when people don't understand that. All it takes is one time with that shit. 



#17 tyedyedee

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:20 PM

I'm trying not to get irate at people who keep jumping on the 'junkie' bandwagon. 

 

I've read countless comments about how "he did this to himself" and "he had a choice, he had the control" and I want to punch them. 

 

Anyone who's ever felt the grasp of heroin knows that you don't have control, it controls you. Sometimes forever. I know folks who have been addicted to this or that, and even if it's been years since they've drank/got high/etc, they say they still feel the urge, all the time. Heroin is arguably the worst one to leave that forever hook in you. 

 

Frustrating when people don't understand that. All it takes is one time with that shit. 

not sure if that rant was directed at me?

 

i hate the drug, not the people

i understand addiction and its power and just HATE the fact that so many wonderful people have been taken too soon as a result of the power this drug held over them

just sad

makes me mad

at the situation, not the people...



#18 hippieskichick

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:24 PM

:lol: Not at all!!

 

 

No, I've seen comments on Yahoo and other sites. 



#19 hippieskichick

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:25 PM

It comes from people who have (apparently, to me) had no exposure to addiction, or know the power that any kind of addiction can have over someone. 



#20 Eddie Z

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:28 PM

I'm so glad that H was never part of my world.   None of my friends were ever into it, we were just into the basic Deadtour treats.  We were always aware of it's presence within the scene, in the dark seedy corners...but we didn't go there. 

 

Given the problems I had with drinking, and a regrettable deep dive into the N20 world....and my present difficulties with legal abuseable substances (food)...it wouldn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that I wouldn't do well with it.    I probably would've sprung my mortal coil 20 years ago, had I even tried it once.



#21 tyedyedee

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:29 PM

yeah, i wasnt sure :lol:

 

i was raised so sheltered that i never heard of it till i "broke out" in 1990

then it took Jerry

and then i started to learn about past people it has taken and then all the people it takes each year

the drug scares the bejeezus outta me and it makes me SO MAD that it takes so many bright stars from us :bang:

 

no chance i will ever try it!

and just ask those who know me well how i react when people i care about try any drugs without roots... :carla:

i just get so scared for them

i dont trust people are honest about what things are

it makes me NUTS to see otherwise smart people doing things that are NOT SMART :gah:

:soapbox:

::gets off soapbox::



#22 Depends

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 02:37 PM

HSC, I understand the frustration.  I have had my share of friends who died from H, and even a few who have beat it.  One thing is common among all of them.  They felt they were "smarter" than the drug.  They never thought they would become addicted.

It really becomes tough when the addict is knee deep, and the stealing/lying becomes everyday life.  It is very hard to be friend/family when everything is being stolen from you.

 

A small group of friends, at 17, we all were experimenting. Out of five of us, 1 never did it, 1 tried once, and stopped, 3 became users.  Of those 3, one kicked successfully many years ago.  The other 2 died way too young.  All of us made choices that summer, over 40 years ago.  



#23 Terrapin Station

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 04:46 PM

1 close friend gone and 3 acquaintances gone because of the H...and people I know back in Pennsylvania still abusing. Starting to think the lack of support centers are a major problem. Some peeps gotta drive 30 mins for a methadone clinic....a lot do not have license due to DUI. Talk about being stuck between a rock and a hard spot. Smh.

#24 Terrapin Station

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 04:48 PM

Didn't know he had 3 kids that young. :sad:

#25 Karen

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 05:15 PM

I'm trying not to get irate at people who keep jumping on the 'junkie' bandwagon. 

 

I've read countless comments about how "he did this to himself" and "he had a choice, he had the control" and I want to punch them. 

 

Anyone who's ever felt the grasp of heroin knows that you don't have control, it controls you. Sometimes forever. I know folks who have been addicted to this or that, and even if it's been years since they've drank/got high/etc, they say they still feel the urge, all the time. Heroin is arguably the worst one to leave that forever hook in you. 

 

Frustrating when people don't understand that. All it takes is one time with that shit. 

 

I believe that heroin addiction an awful and extremely difficult addiction to get clean from.     Very powerful drug and physically addicting drug...    

 

He did however, do it to himself.   He did have a choice.    He chose to use again and he overdosed.



#26 BHB

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 06:29 PM

Didn't know he had 3 kids that young. :sad:

 

 

ya, that's the bummer here.

 

sad that kids didn't provide the motivation needed to put the needle down.

 

rip



#27 china cat

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 08:00 PM

I believe that heroin addiction an awful and extremely difficult addiction to get clean from.     Very powerful drug and physically addicting drug...    

 

He did however, do it to himself.   He did have a choice.    He chose to use again and he overdosed.

 

I understand the sentiment. I do think sometimes the word "choice" makes understanding the differences within the human condition more difficult to appreciate. "Choice" is evaluated based on a rather generalized/generic definition of the term that fails to consider that all of our choices are made within the context of our personal experience, thus the perception of available choices varies from person to person.

 

Some of us have a healthier and wider perspective and access to more choices. Our upbringing, our personal development has cleared our path and opened our vision to see more possibilities. The demon of addiction, abuse, suffering, depression... narrows vision.  If your mind is so convoluted with pain that it can't see a different choice, does the choice then really exist for that person?



#28 Sensei Miller

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 09:48 PM

Indeed, it's been suggested that he may have had some of the fentanyl-laced product that has claimed lives at an alarming rate since it was released a few weeks ago.

 

Lost my father to H.  Lost more friends than I care to mention to it.  Almost lost myself to it. 

 

It seems so benign, until it's not.  Similarly, it is a choice, until it's not. 

 

It really sucks to have that much pain. 



#29 china cat

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 10:55 PM

big pharma drugs may have played a  role (6 different scripts) - mixing this cocktail may have influenced his body's reaction/ability to handle what he injected. surely looks like a serious H addiction though. 

 

Still  so saddened by this.

 

http://usnews.nbcnew...ds-sources?lite



#30 china cat

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 10:56 PM

Indeed, it's been suggested that he may have had some of the fentanyl-laced product that has claimed lives at an alarming rate since it was released a few weeks ago.

 

Lost my father to H.  Lost more friends than I care to mention to it.  Almost lost myself to it. 

 

It seems so benign, until it's not.  Similarly, it is a choice, until it's not. 

 

It really sucks to have that much pain. 

 

Glad you're here. Sorry for what you've experienced. <3



#31 Kuzsin

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 11:44 PM

....my blood used to boil and my heart broke everytime i heard h bombs on shakedown street....some drugs are just not the experience we search for....unfortunatly many of us have seen the sin which this drug unleashes on loved ones...others here had a tougher reality....we need to talk more....love more....and forgive more.....

#32 Sensei Miller

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 01:31 AM

Those are really nice sentiments you guys, thank you.

#33 holysmokes

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 01:00 PM

I was pretty close to him for some Scent Of A Woman scenes filmed at Emma Willard in Troy 20 plus years ago. He was an unknown actor to me at the time, but he certainly made a name for himself in the acting world since. One of my favorite roles for him was in Along Came Polly.



#34 china cat

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 01:37 PM

"He often played creeps, but he rarely played them creepily. His metier was human loneliness — the terrible uncinematic kind that has very little to do with high-noon heroism and everything to do with everyday empathy — and the necessary curse of human self-knowledge. He held up a mirror to those who could barely stand to look at themselves and invited us not only to take a peek but to see someone we recognized"  http://www.esquire.c...d?src=soc_fcbks

 

love that.

 

 


 


#35 scarfire

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 03:19 PM

talented actor - sad story indeed.



#36 gregoir

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 03:41 PM

very sad.  I really don't feel for H addicts anymore though.  Too many friends gone.  The first time you do it you know what you are risking.  Never done it and I refuse to be around people that do.  It's going to end bad no matter what. 



#37 BHC2352

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 04:31 PM

Gregoir I feel you on that my friend. Seen too much bad shit. Having said that, he was an amazing actor. Easy guy to fall in love with from Almost Famous, Along Came Polly, and Pirate Radio. Then he plays a scumbag in a movie like Before the Devil Knows You're Dead, which is such a hard movie to watch, mostly b/c of the excellent acting. Gonna miss this guy. He was scheduled to do a comedy for some premium channel I think. Would have loved that.



#38 Tim the Beek

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 04:54 PM

Indeed, it's been suggested that he may have had some of the fentanyl-laced product that has claimed lives at an alarming rate since it was released a few weeks ago.

 

Lost my father to H.  Lost more friends than I care to mention to it.  Almost lost myself to it. 

 

It seems so benign, until it's not.  Similarly, it is a choice, until it's not. 

 

It really sucks to have that much pain. 


Glad you're still around. :)

Glad, too, that I never acquired a taste for opiates. Just never cared for them despite some dabbling I did back when. Surprising, I guess, given the claws the hunger for alcohol once had in me.

I thoroughly understand how a time can come where there's no longer a choice. I'm immensely grateful that my choice regarding booze was restored. Also believe it's likely that choosing to have a glass of whiskey would quickly get me back to no longer having a choice again.
 



#39 insolent cur

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 05:54 PM

Russell Brand: my life without drugs

Russell Brand has not used drugs for 10 years. He has a job, a house, a cat, good friends. But temptation is never far away. He wants to help other addicts, but first he wants us to feel compassion for those affected

 

http://www.theguardi...e-without-drugs

 

The last time I thought about taking heroin was yesterday. I had received "an inconvenient truth" from a beautiful woman. It wasn't about climate change – I'm not that ecologically switched on – she told me she was pregnant and it wasn't mine.

 

I had to take immediate action. I put Morrissey on in my car as an external conduit for the surging melancholy, and as I wound my way through the neurotic Hollywood hills, the narrow lanes and tight bends were a material echo of the synaptic tangle where my thoughts stalled and jammed.

 

Morrissey, as ever, conducted a symphony, within and without and the tidal misery burgeoned. I am becoming possessed. The part of me that experienced the negative data, the self, is becoming overwhelmed, I can no longer see where I end and the pain begins. So now I have a choice.

 

I cannot accurately convey to you the efficiency of heroin in neutralising pain. It transforms a tight, white fist into a gentle, brown wave. From my first inhalation 15 years ago, it fumigated my private hell and lay me down in its hazy pastures and a bathroom floor in Hackney embraced me like a womb.

 

This shadow is darkly cast on the retina of my soul and whenever I am dislodged from comfort my focus falls there.

It is 10 years since I used drugs or drank alcohol and my life has improved immeasurably. I have a job, a house, a cat, good friendships and generally a bright outlook.

 

The price of this is constant vigilance because the disease of addiction is not rational. Recently for the purposes of a documentary on this subject I reviewed some footage of myself smoking heroin that my friend had shot as part of a typically exhibitionist attempt of mine to get clean.

 

I sit wasted and slumped with an unacceptable haircut against a wall in another Hackney flat (Hackney is starting to seem like part of the problem) inhaling fizzy, black snakes of smack off a scrap of crumpled foil. When I saw the tape a month or so ago, what is surprising is that my reaction is not one of gratitude for the positive changes I've experienced but envy at witnessing an earlier version of myself unencumbered by the burden of abstinence. I sat in a suite at the Savoy hotel, in privilege, resenting the woeful ratbag I once was, who, for all his problems, had drugs. That is obviously irrational.

 

The mentality and behaviour of drug addicts and alcoholics is wholly irrational until you understand that they are completely powerless over their addiction and unless they have structured help they have no hope.

 

This is the reason I have started a fund within Comic Relief, Give It Up. I want to raise awareness of, and money for, abstinence-based recovery. It was Kevin Cahill's idea, he is the bloke who runs Comic Relief. He called me when he read an article I wrote after Amy Winehouse died. Her death had a powerful impact on me I suppose because it was such an obvious shock, like watching someone for hours through a telescope, seeing them advance towards you, fist extended with the intention of punching you in the face. Even though I saw it coming, it still hurt when it eventually hit me.

 

What was so painful about Amy's death is that I know that there is something I could have done. I could have passed on to her the solution that was freely given to me. Don't pick up a drink or drug, one day at a time. It sounds so simple. It actually is simple but it isn't easy: it requires incredible support and fastidious structuring. Not to mention that the whole infrastructure of abstinence based recovery is shrouded in necessary secrecy. There are support fellowships that are easy to find and open to anyone who needs them but they eschew promotion of any kind in order to preserve the purity of their purpose, which is for people with alcoholism and addiction to help one another stay clean and sober.

 

Without these fellowships I would take drugs. Because, even now, the condition persists. Drugs and alcohol are not my problem, reality is my problem, drugs and alcohol are my solution.

 

If this seems odd to you it is because you are not an alcoholic or a drug addict. You are likely one of the 90% of people who can drink and use drugs safely. I have friends who can smoke weed, swill gin, even do crack and then merrily get on with their lives. For me, this is not an option. I will relinquish all else to ride that buzz to oblivion. Even if it began as a timid glass of chardonnay on a ponce's yacht, it would end with me necking the bottle, swimming to shore and sprinting to Bethnal Green in search of a crack house. I look to drugs and booze to fill up a hole in me; unchecked, the call of the wild is too strong. I still survey streets for signs of the subterranean escapes that used to provide my sanctuary. I still eye the shuffling subclass of junkies and dealers, invisibly gliding between doorways through the gutters. I see that dereliction can survive in opulence; the abundantly wealthy with destitution in their stare.

 

Spurred by Amy's death, I've tried to salvage unwilling victims from the mayhem of the internal storm and I am always, always, just pulled inside myself. I have a friend so beautiful, so haunted by talent that you can barely look away from her, whose smile is such a treasure that I have often squandered my sanity for a moment in its glow. Her story is so galling that no one would condemn her for her dependency on illegal anesthesia, but now, even though her life is trying to turn around despite her, even though she has genuine opportunities for a new start, the gutter will not release its prey. The gutter is within. It is frustrating to watch. It is frustrating to love someone with this disease.

 

A friend of mine's brother cannot stop drinking. He gets a few months of sobriety and his inner beauty, with the obstacles of his horrible drunken behaviour pushed aside by the presence of a programme, begins to radiate. His family bask relieved, in the joy of their returned loved one, his life gathers momentum but then he somehow forgets the price of this freedom, returns to his old way of thinking, picks up a drink and Mr Hyde is back in the saddle. Once more his brother's face is gaunt and hopeless. His family blame themselves and wonder what they could have done differently, racking their minds for a perfect sentiment; wrapped up in the perfect sentence, a magic bullet to sear right through the toxic fortress that has incarcerated the person they love and restore them to sanity. The fact is, though, that they can't, the sufferer must, of course, be a willing participant in their own recovery. They must not pick up a drink or drug, one day at a time. Just don't pick up, that's all.

 

It is difficult to feel sympathy for these people. It is difficult to regard some bawdy drunk and see them as sick and powerless. It is difficult to suffer the selfishness of a drug addict who will lie to you and steal from you and forgive them and offer them help. Can there be any other disease that renders its victims so unappealing? Would Great Ormond Street be so attractive a cause if its beds were riddled with obnoxious little criminals that had "brought it on themselves"?

 

Peter Hitchens is a vocal adversary of mine on this matter. He sees this condition as a matter of choice and the culprits as criminals who should go to prison. I know how he feels. I bet I have to deal with a lot more drug addicts than he does, let's face it. I share my brain with one, and I can tell you firsthand, they are total fucking wankers. Where I differ from Peter is in my belief that if you regard alcoholics and drug addicts not as bad people but as sick people then we can help them to get better. By we, I mean other people who have the same problem but have found a way to live drug-and-alcohol-free lives. Guided by principles and traditions a programme has been founded that has worked miracles in millions of lives. Not just the alcoholics and addicts themselves but their families, their friends and of course society as a whole.

 

What we want to do with Give It Up is popularise a compassionate perception of drunks and addicts, and provide funding for places at treatment centres where they can get clean using these principles. Then, once they are drug-and-alcohol-free, to make sure they retain contact with the support that is available to keep them clean. I know that as you read this you either identify with it yourself or are reminded of someone who you love who cannot exercise control over substances. I want you to know that the help that was available to me, the help upon which my recovery still depends is available.

 

I wound down the hill in an alien land, Morrissey chanted lonely mantras, the pain quickly accumulated incalculably, and I began to weave the familiar tapestry that tells an old, old story. I think of places I could score. Off Santa Monica there's a homeless man who I know uses gear. I could find him, buy him a bag if he takes me to score.

 

I leave him on the corner, a couple of rocks, a couple of $20 bags pressed into my sweaty palm. I get home, I pull out the foil, neatly torn. I break the bottom off a Martell miniature. I have cigarettes, using makes me need fags. I make a pipe for the rocks with the bottle. I lay a strip of foil on the counter to chase the brown. I pause to reflect and regret that I don't know how to fix, only smoke, feeling inferior even in the manner of my using. I see the foil scorch. I hear the crackle from which crack gets it's name. I feel the plastic fog hit the back of my yawning throat. Eyes up. Back relaxing, the bottle drops and the greedy bliss eats my pain. There is no girl, there is no tomorrow, there is nothing but the bilious kiss of the greedy bliss.

 

Even as I spin this beautifully dreaded web, I am reaching for my phone. I call someone: not a doctor or a sage, not a mystic or a physician, just a bloke like me, another alcoholic, who I know knows how I feel. The phone rings and I half hope he'll just let it ring out. It's 4am in London. He's asleep, he can't hear the phone, he won't pick up. I indicate left, heading to Santa Monica. The ringing stops, then the dry mouthed nocturnal mumble: "Hello. You all right mate?"

 

He picks up.

 

And for another day, thank God, I don't have to.



#40 Tim the Beek

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 06:00 PM

Even as I spin this beautifully dreaded web, I am reaching for my phone. I call someone: not a doctor or a sage, not a mystic or a physician, just a bloke like me, another alcoholic, who I know knows how I feel. The phone rings and I half hope he'll just let it ring out. It's 4am in London. He's asleep, he can't hear the phone, he won't pick up. I indicate left, heading to Santa Monica. The ringing stops, then the dry mouthed nocturnal mumble: "Hello. You all right mate?"

 

He picks up.

 

And for another day, thank God, I don't have to.


This brought a tear to my eye. A grateful one.



#41 unbroken_chain

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 07:16 PM

Heroin Kills.  Even those who never took it or used it on their own accord.      



 



#42 china cat

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 06:06 AM

"Drugs and alcohol are not my problem, reality is my problem, drugs and alcohol are my solution."

 

wow, that really struck me. Thanks for posting, Cur



#43 china cat

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 06:09 AM

 I'm immensely grateful that my choice regarding booze was restored.

 

me too <3



#44 holysmokes

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 03:56 PM

Here is another clip of PSH from the movie Almost Famous ...

 

 

Lots of insightful remarks in the article insolent cur posted by Russell Brand:

 

I have friends who can smoke weed, swill gin, even do crack and then merrily get on with their lives. For me, this is not an option. I will relinquish all else to ride that buzz to oblivion... I look to drugs and booze to fill up a hole in me; unchecked, the call of the wild is too strong.

 

I cannot accurately convey to you the efficiency of heroin in neutralising pain... This shadow is darkly cast on the retina of my soul and whenever I am dislodged from comfort my focus falls there.

 

Then there is this remark that while on its face seems spot on, there is one glaring omission...

 

Where I differ from Peter is in my belief that if you regard alcoholics and drug addicts not as bad people but as sick people then we can help them to get better. By we, I mean other people who have the same problem but have found a way to live drug-and-alcohol-free lives. Guided by principles and traditions a programme has been founded that has worked miracles in millions of lives. Not just the alcoholics and addicts themselves but their families, their friends and of course society as a whole.

 

The omission being that for the above to hold true the addict has to be ready to get healthy and stop using.  No matter how much support he/she has, it will do no good until they hit their own proverbial rock bottom and want a different life for themselves.