Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Please explain farm subsidies to me...


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 29 January 2014 - 05:10 PM

Ok, guys, I've been reading the latest thread, as well as the latest news, and I guess I just don't understand what the farm subsidies are all about? 

 

What do they do?

 

What were they originally intended to do? 

 

What have they become? 

 

Overall, are they good or bad for the public? 

 

Are they good for farmers? Which ones, large or small? 

 

 

Please and thank you. I can't make a lot of sense out of what I've looked up, and I know a few of you follow this stuff. (Andy, TASB, I'm looking at you kids ;) )



#2 Depends

Depends
  • VibeTribe
  • 12,044 posts

Posted 29 January 2014 - 06:03 PM

http://www.finweb.co...l#axzz2roOrHse9



#3 TEO

TEO

    VibeGuide

  • VibeGuide
  • 23,164 posts

Posted 29 January 2014 - 06:07 PM

At times farmers are also paid to not grow crops, produce.



#4 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,424 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 29 January 2014 - 06:23 PM

Dairy Farmers Welcome Farm Bill's Subsidy Overhaul

http://abcnews.go.co...erhaul-22283559

 

This one explains the Milk subsidy well.

 

 

Instead of limiting milk production, the compromise legislation restricts farmers' ability to buy subsidized insurance to cover their losses if they produce too much milk and cause prices to plummet.


#5 Uncle Coulro

Uncle Coulro
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,563 posts

Posted 29 January 2014 - 11:07 PM

The subsidies enable the government to influence, if not control, prices and supply. Originally (before the Great Depression), subsidies in the US were created to prevent family farms from tanking. That was back when millions of families operated farms. Now, farm subsidies pump money out of our pockets and go directly to giant multi-national agribusinesses. It's theft - just like oil subsidies. No difference at all.



#6 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 29 January 2014 - 11:32 PM

The overall impression I get from my reading is that they suck. Originally started as a good idea, pitched as a good/helpful idea, but it seems to get farmers too caught up in the money/politics game. 



#7 TakeAStepBack

TakeAStepBack
  • VibeTribe
  • 18,745 posts

Posted 30 January 2014 - 03:05 PM

The subsidies enable the government to influence, if not control, prices and supply. Originally (before the Great Depression), subsidies in the US were created to prevent family farms from tanking. That was back when millions of families operated farms. Now, farm subsidies pump money out of our pockets and go directly to giant multi-national agribusinesses. It's theft - just like oil subsidies. No difference at all.

 

This one.



#8 TakeAStepBack

TakeAStepBack
  • VibeTribe
  • 18,745 posts

Posted 30 January 2014 - 03:07 PM

The overall impression I get from my reading is that they suck. Originally started as a good idea, pitched as a good/helpful idea, but it seems to get farmers too caught up in the money/politics game. 

 

All good intentions pave the road to hell. It's another sector of our corporatist/statist governance. There isn't a single industry left that i can think of that isn't cozied up tot he legislators for favors and hand washing.



#9 Julius

Julius
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,363 posts

Posted 30 January 2014 - 03:16 PM

Not often mentioned or acknowledged but putting safeguards in place to protect the self-sufficiency of our food supply over the long term is also a matter of national security. That's the bigger picture. Lots to quibble about regarding the execution of the strategy though. 



#10 TakeAStepBack

TakeAStepBack
  • VibeTribe
  • 18,745 posts

Posted 30 January 2014 - 03:20 PM

There isn't a damned bit of sefl sufficiency involved in getting hand outs for backdoor price control reasons. THAT is the very definition of "not self sufficient".



#11 grateful_1

grateful_1
  • VibeTribe
  • 129 posts
  • LocationCT

Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:27 PM

The subsidies farmers (read big companies now) - yes, small ones too...but most have been gobbled up. 

 

 

We were a nation of many producers...once!



#12 Julius

Julius
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,363 posts

Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:42 PM

I prefer to look at where things are going rather than kvetch about where they've been. 

 

The new (proposed) approach seems more akin to federally subsidized crop insurance rather than handouts to not plant. This is good. 



#13 Julius

Julius
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,363 posts

Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:45 PM

Also there is the stick as well as the carrot. Not sure how they're going to wield that yet but you definitely want to make sure that enough land is laid fallow each year. 



#14 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:52 PM

I prefer to look at where things are going rather than kvetch about where they've been. 

 

 

Yes, but trend analysis is important. It is easy to get caught up in crabbing about past fuckups though. 



#15 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,424 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 30 January 2014 - 06:30 PM

Will the welfare reform included in this bill limit its chance of becoming law?

 

I agree with Julius this is a good thing, but worry that welfare will get in the way of this becoming law.



#16 TakeAStepBack

TakeAStepBack
  • VibeTribe
  • 18,745 posts

Posted 30 January 2014 - 07:32 PM

It still think you will see price changes from such a move. But I also agree the free shit provisions of the bill might kill its chances.



#17 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,424 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 04 February 2014 - 07:58 PM

 
Here's five lesser-known things the farm bill could mean to you:
 
1. You will know a lot more about your meat: How much do you know about the chicken breast you just bought? Or that ribeye? This Farm Bill marks a major decision in the fierce fight over product labeling, by backing a new requirement that pork, chicken or beef sold in the United States must include details on where the animal was born, slaughtered and processed.
 
Take a look at a package of meat in the store tonight and you'll see it. That information has been on labels since the fall. But Canadian and Mexican meat producers have fought the new U.S. labeling rule in world courts and furiously tried to have it reversed by the Farm Bill. In the final days of negotiations, lawmakers decided to keep the meat labeling rule. So if your meat is from the U.S. or if it was ever handled in Mexico, Canada or Australia, you'll know.
 
2. Farmers will see less risk; federal government takes on more: The bill dramatically changes 82 years of agricultural subsidies, ending guaranteed payments that farmers receive regardless of their harvest quality or crop prices. But, because those "direct payments" have been in place for generations, many farm values became based on the expectation of government dollars. Ending them could have wide-ranging effects.
 
To try and mitigate the hit, the Farm Bill beefs up a different kind of subsidy -- a subsidy for crop insurance. This is complex, but in short, the government will make crop insurance cheaper and it will pay out some benefits at lower levels than previously. That will make farming less risky for some. But it transfers that risk to the federal government, which could be even more on tap if crop prices plummet or if a disaster hits. Good for farmers, risky for the deficit.
 
3. Lawmakers aren't disclosing something: Just like any farmer, members of Congress who own farmland can receive the crop insurance subsidies we talked about above. This can significantly cut premiums and save a bundle of money. The Republican House of Representatives initially thought it was a good idea to know who in Congress would benefit from those subsidies and the original version of the bill included a requirement that lawmakers disclose if they or anyone in their immediate family receive the government help. But the Senate did not include the provision and in the end the House and Senate agreed to drop it.
 
Lawmakers could have opted for a higher standard of transparency either for themselves or for everyone receiving these subsidies, but instead the public will have no way of discovering where this money flows.
 
Farm bill ends subsidies, cuts food stamps
 
4. We have land problems: The race to scoop up recent farming profits, especially in corn, has led to increased plowing of virgin lands in the United States. At the same time, rural areas face more soil erosion and other issues from land that has been worked for generations. The Farm Bill does something new on both issues. It forces farmers who want subsidies to follow a series of conservation practices. And it aims to protect more prairie land by cutting subsidies in half for people who farm on some virgin sod.
 
Environmentalists have applauded the provisions, but aren't doing back flips. They note that the bill cuts direct spending on government conservation programs overall.
 
5. What goes in your body -- corn and sushi: The Farm Bill decides which crops the U.S. government wants to encourage or protect. It gives incentives to grow more of them. The most subsidized crops in this (and in most Farm Bills of the past) are the so-called "row crops," things like wheat, soy, and the king of American agriculture, corn.
 
These subsidies are one reason corn will remain one of the country's most reliable sources of food, from cattle feed to soda sweetener. The green and yellow vegetable will be a major part of your life for the foreseeable future. At the same time, this bill adds a few new winners to the list of subsidized row crops, among them sushi rice. If sushi rice prices fall too low, the government will now make up the difference. The possible result of that? More farmers will consider planting the crop. And there will likely be more American sushi rice to go around.


#18 TakeAStepBack

TakeAStepBack
  • VibeTribe
  • 18,745 posts

Posted 04 February 2014 - 08:25 PM

This bill passsed the house.

 

I love this one from Andy's post:

 

 

 Farmers will see less risk; federal government takes on more:

 

Well, i for one am completely fucking shocked! :lmao:



#19 TakeAStepBack

TakeAStepBack
  • VibeTribe
  • 18,745 posts

Posted 04 February 2014 - 08:26 PM

Then LOLberals tell us the federal government is the people.



#20 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,424 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 04 February 2014 - 08:28 PM

This bill passsed the house.

 

I love this one from Andy's post:

 

 

 

Well, i for one am completely fucking shocked! :lmao:

 

 

I agree with this one.  :lol:  This comment is what led me to post the list here.



#21 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,424 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 04 February 2014 - 09:48 PM

This bill passsed the house.

 

Senate passed this today.

 

 

On to O for his signature.



#22 TakeAStepBack

TakeAStepBack
  • VibeTribe
  • 18,745 posts

Posted 04 February 2014 - 10:48 PM

Senate passed this today.

 

 

On to O for his signature.

 

Thanks.



#23 china cat

china cat
  • VibeTribe
  • 14,994 posts

Posted 05 February 2014 - 04:18 PM

"The most subsidized crops in this (and in most Farm Bills of the past) are the so-called "row crops," things like wheat, soy, and the king of American agriculture, corn."

 

yeah! more gluten, toxic soy, and gm corn syrup for all!!!!!



#24 Ginger Snap

Ginger Snap
  • VibeTribe
  • 12,870 posts

Posted 09 February 2014 - 03:45 PM

Great. More corn. :rolleyes: 

 

I have a question about the crop insurance...could this mean that a farmer who traditional grows something heavily subsidized in the past could try growing other crops without taking on all of the risk if it doesn't go so well right out of the gate?