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Would you let your son play football?


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#1 concert andy

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:33 PM

I will start with, I would.

 

I remember my watching football with my father in law and his brothers (Kates uncles).  Some random Penn State game back in 2002 or 2003.  They each had young boys and started talking about they would never sign the waiver for kids to play football for their local high schools when they reached that age.

 

I said I would let mine, but did not really get into it with them.  My only defense was, that I played football in High School and that I thought it helped me graduate high school.  The dicsipline and peer pressure to go to and do well in school is another key reason I would.

 

Football is more of a team game then many of the other sports.

 

 

I understand the other side of this argument.  But I think the benefits and lessons learned from playing football out weigh the individual kid's parents concerns. IMO. 

 

 

Let's discuss.  There are no wrong answers, these are all personal preferences to your own family.  And Please no one should think anyone is telling someone how to raise their kids.  



#2 MeOmYo

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:42 PM

yes



#3 In A Silent Way

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:44 PM

I'm inclined to say no because I'm worried about long-term knee and neck injuries. I'd probably let my son play hockey if he wanted. My wife & I actually haven't discussed this, but I think she'd be happier to see him in hockey than football.

 

My younger daughter is a cheerleader, which is essentially gymnastics without floor mats, so maybe I should be concerned about her knees and head.



#4 concert andy

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:46 PM

I'm inclined to say no because I'm worried about long-term knee and neck injuries. I'd probably let my son play hockey if he wanted. My wife & I actually haven't discussed this, but I think she'd be happier to see him in hockey than football.

 

My younger daughter is a cheerleader, which is essentially gymnastics without floor mats, so maybe I should be concerned about her knees and head.

 

 

While those are legit injury concerns, most people use the head injury as the biggest long term injury concern as the logic behind saying no.



#5 Royal

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 09:06 PM

I probably won't ever had children but I would say no to both football and cheerleading.  I don't think high school age kids are capable of thinking about the long term consequences of dangerous sports.  I'm not saying not to participate in sports.  In the fall there was (as least when I was in school) Soccer, Field Hockey, Cross Country, Water Polo, and sometimes Tennis.  These sports can fulfill the benefits that athletics provide in a safer setting.  I realize all sports have some risk but football and cheerleading are too dangerous.



#6 concert andy

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 09:11 PM

I probably won't ever had children but I would say no to both football and cheerleading.  I don't think high school age kids are capable of thinking about the long term consequences of dangerous sports.  I'm not saying not to participate in sports.  In the fall there was (as least when I was in school) Soccer, Field Hockey, Cross Country, Water Polo, and sometimes Tennis.  These sports can fulfill the benefits that athletics provide in a safer setting.  I realize all sports have some risk but football and cheerleading are too dangerous.

 

 

People dont think of Cheerleeding as dangerous, but I think it is more dangerous than football.  



#7 hippieskichick

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 09:16 PM

Being the anti-establishment typa chick that I am, I'll say (probably) no, like Ry, to both foozball and cheerleading. There are many other team building sports out there that aren't so brainwashingly mainstream and clique-y. It has nothing to do with physical danger, though. I'm an adrenaline junkie, so I could never argue that point. 

 

I would go against it for all the high school drama bullshit jock snobby preppy garbage. I grew up in a tiny, very clique-y school, and if I were to ever have kids (which I'm not going to) I would not choose a large city to raise them, so they would likely be subject to the same snotty shit that I was. 

 

That being said, if my kid came up to me and asked, then I would let them try it. I won't force my beliefs on a child - I vehemently despise that. I will just raise them to be open minded and hope like fucking sweet hell they wouldn't want to be a fucking cheerleader. 

 

If my daughter wanted to be a cheerleader, I would support her with my whole heart, and try to be there if/when she went through all the bullshit from her peers. 

 

(yes, I realize I'm being very biased against 'that type' and I know they're not all like that.)



#8 Java Time

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:27 PM

if he wants to play football I would let him play football



#9 Jersey Thug

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:55 PM

Jason was captain of his HS football team and has all sorts of medical issues resulting from the abuse he put his body through.

 

that being said, without football he undoubtedly would have found another outlet for his...energy...and who knows how that might have played out.

 

if we had a son, we wouldn't encourage football, but if football was what he loved, i don't think we'd fight it either.  maybe just encourage him to be the kicker and not defensive tackle :)



#10 mamapajama

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 12:19 AM

My son is 13.  He plays music and computer games.  He has had his fill of karate and swimming and maybe might try basketball.  I don't think I'm going to have to ever worry about him and football.  If he did want to play, I would probably try to sway him in a different direction but if he made a strong case, 1. I'd be impressed that he made a strong case  and 2. I'd support him. 



#11 gregoir

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 01:14 AM

one of my best buddies does research on former NFL players and the effect of football on their brains.  from what I have learned from him def No



#12 Count P-Funk

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 01:31 AM

I am hoping that my 2 boys don't want to play football so that I don't have to discourage them.

As gregoir points out, the data on the impact of football related head injuries is scary and I don't want to take the risk. 



#13 HEADYYETTY

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 11:28 AM

HAVE A SON 6 YEARS OLD. ALLREADY TOLD HIM NO FOOTBALL
I PLAYED BACK IN HIGH-SCHOOL BACK INJURIES THAT STILL BOTHER ME TODAY.NOT WORTH IT.VERY RUFF SPORT

#14 TheDHJ

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 12:36 PM

one of my best buddies does research on former NFL players and the effect of football on their brains.  from what I have learned from him def No

 

I work with people that asses the physical damage, and it's really, really scary. I have two boys...I'm not athletic...we're not a sports family...we don't "put on the game, bro" or anything like that, so I doubt they'll play sports.



#15 namaste

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 02:26 PM

My kids are grown (nearly) 21 and 26 year old boys and a 29 yr old girl.   I let them do pretty much anything they wanted to try back when they were small.  (within reason and within boundaries)  They were huge readers, scouts, (I was the leader), took music lessons which all of my kids pursued till the end of HS.  The boys wanted BB guns at age 8, I gave in at age 12.  I didn't want them playing war or killing things and they got that, they were all gentle kids. The boys were typical country kids, hiking, dirt bikes etc.

 

 Little league baseball and then the dreaded (to me) football requests at age 9-10.  Their father had played and loved it.  They both tried it for awhile, but stopped before high school and became more bookish/hippy-ish.  I believe in allowing kids to try things and find out for themselves what they are suited for.  They are not me and they are not mine to mold, they are themselves and as such deserve to learn through their own experiences.  Do not start asking if I let them try heroin and eat fast food all day because of course I didn't let them do crazy dangerous things.  I'm glad they gave up football before it became dangerous.  But I would have supported them even if I didn't like football. 



#16 TEO

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 03:34 PM

Let yes, encourage to choose to play football, no.  Be supportive of choice made, yes.



#17 foo

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 02:45 AM

My daughter was a cheerleader. It scared the shit out of me when they made her a flyer in high school. I hated that they would  throw her up in the air and prayed that they caught her. every. single. time. I went to every game.... home and away. I was very happy that she didn't continue the 3rd year of high school and got a job instead!  



#18 Royal

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 02:51 AM

Injured MSU Cheerleader's Dad: "Glad To See Your Booty Isn't Gettin' Big"
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Cheerleading Accident Forces Delay In Florida State-Michigan State Basketball Game, Emotional Display From Mike Tirico

Michigan State cheerleader Taylor Young is "OK," per Spartans AD Mark Hollis, after taking a spill in the first half of MSU's game… Read…

We were happy to report last night that Michigan State cheerleader Taylor Young was doing fine after a scary accident that left her sprawled out and unconscious at center court of East Lansing's Breslin Center during the Spartans' 65-49 win over Florida State.

Her father, too, seemed happy—happy enough to post this image of her prone body to his (public as of this writing, but inevitably soon to be private) Facebook gallery, along with an approving comment on the state of her ass. (Currently nine people Like This.)

Taylor, meanwhile, is wondering why nobody bothered to pull her skirt back down. As for how she responded to her father posting the image:

ku-medium.jpgSExpand

[h/t to matthew.scholtes]

 
 
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Lionel OsbourneUTimothy Burke

Something tells me this guy owns more than one "No Fat Chicks" T-shirt. 12/01/11 3:12pm

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In addition to a few "If you can read this, the Bitch fell off" tank tops. 12/01/11 3:15pm

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Dezzie_Does_DallasULionel Osbourne

Ironically, He met Taylor's mother and past boyfriend in Cabo while wearing a 'hold my beer while I make out with your girlfriend shirt'. 12/01/11 4:25pm

 
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#19 deadheadskier

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 04:54 AM

I played a couple of years of football and lacrosse in high school; two of the more violent sports.  I sustained worse injuries skiing and mountain biking than I did playing either football or lacrosse.  That probably had more to do with greater time spent participating in the those sports though.

 

Interestingly enough, my high school no longer has a football program nor does our main rival.  This was the longest running football rivalry in all of New England.  Both schools started to struggle fielding teams in recent years due to concussion fears from student parents who didn't want their kids playing the game.  Two years ago both schools gave up their football programs.  

 

I love the game of football.  I won't encourage my future children to play it, but if they want to, I wouldn't say no.

 

Now Hockey?  Hell no.  I ain't getting up at 5AM on the weekends to bring my kids to the rink because that's the only time ice is available.  :lol:  



#20 mug

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 12:22 PM

Yes. My son plays goal in hockey and lacrosse. I was not allowed to play organized football in my youth. I did play lacrosse though, and my parents were cool with that.

#21 Ginger Snap

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 12:30 PM

Jerry played football in seventh grade. It was really intense all the practices and his fingers got jammed all the time so he couldn't play guitar when he got home, so ultumitely he decided not to continue the next year- as a mother I wasn't willing to council him to continue playing even though he was getting hurt. Plus, he just never really fit in with most of the boys on the team. He's a musician.

 

Abby wanted to be in cheerleading and my only rule to that was that she absolutely under no circimstances was to be a flier. She's so petite and skinny I knew what they had in mind for her while they recruited her. Absolutely no way was she to be a flier. - You're not throwing my babygirl all over the place. Ultimately she never joined that sport. 



#22 In A Silent Way

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 05:31 PM

I haven't seen my daughter's routines yet, but I hope she stays close to the ground. :unsure:



#23 sarah b.

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 05:41 PM

not without a mouth guard (would apply to any contact sport). I don't have kids, but I do/coach judo, have broken bones doing it (my mistake for not taking a fall I should've), healed and still practice.

#24 nikkiblue

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 11:00 AM

Since when is cheerleading a dangerous sport???  



#25 concert andy

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 01:18 PM

Since when is cheerleading a dangerous sport???  

 

Competitive cheerleeding is the worst.   Basic cheerleeding for a team not so much.

 

But if you have a "flier" it can be very dangerous.  

 

http://lmgtfy.com/?q...ecome dangerous



#26 jme

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 02:39 PM

nope, i have very little faith in youth football coaches.



#27 In A Silent Way

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 08:25 PM

I suck at parenting and deserve to have my kids taken away by DCF



#28 jme

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 08:51 PM

so, she's the aerial?  :lol:



#29 Jwheelz

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:07 PM

Since when is cheerleading a dangerous sport???  

 

http://articles.wash...rt-cheerleading



#30 In A Silent Way

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:14 PM

She said she's too tall to be a flyer, and I was relieved. But then she told me "the bases get hurt way more than the flyers."

 

:eek1:



#31 In A Silent Way

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:15 PM

Study Finds Only Safe Place To Tackle Football Players Is 4-Inch Area On Right Thigh

http://www.theonion....ball-pla,34114/



#32 concert andy

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 02:29 PM

I know many of you do know about concussion research, but many may not.  Here is a startling stat from the pioneer of studying brain injuries to football players.  45 of 46 is pretty telling.

 

 

 

“We’re at a very strange time. We know there’s a problem. We’ve identified a problem. But we don’t have many answers. So it’s a really uncomfortable time knowing a little but not knowing enough.”

 

 
—Dr. Ann McKee, who has studied 46 deceased former NFL players’ brains and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy—a crippling brain disease—in 45, at a speech Thursday night at Samford University in Birmingham, Ala. The remarks were reported by the Birmingham News. 
 
McKee, one of the medical stars of the PBS documentary League of Denial, is in my opinion a hero of this movement for pushing for more answers, and more studies of how football affects the brain. As she told the News: “It’s very inconvenient. This is a big problem. It’s not something you can easily solve. It’s going to make your life much more complicated if you’re involved in sports at all. It definitely has huge financial repercussions. And sometimes it’s hard to change people’s minds.”


#33 butterqueen

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 07:37 PM

When I was in junior high and briefly in high school, I was a cheerleader. I was used to the danger and falls to a certain extent from doing gymnastics before that, but at least in gymnastics, you had people who knew what they were doing. 

 

Cheerleading was run by some mom or teacher and we were in there doing things we didn't know how to do and everyone would get kicked or fall. I was a base so I always had marks on me from having people stand on me. 

 

I went to cheerleading camp even...oh god, the horror. 



#34 In A Silent Way

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 08:07 PM

OK, now I feel worse. :rolling:

 

I think the most important thing the girls are learning in tumbling class is how to spot each other.



#35 In A Silent Way

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:28 PM

People dont think of Cheerleeding as dangerous, but I think it is more dangerous than football.  

 

Football players wear pads and helmets. Cheerleaders wear miniskirts and bows. At the state finals, one girl on the team got her nose broken. Then the final pyramid collapsed and another girl got her face stepped on. :shocked:

 

So now the season is over, and my daughter is in physical therapy for her back. The problem there is she went into this without ever having done any core strengthening exercises, and ended up being a base for shoulder stands. Everyone is starting the Insanity workout three days a week after school, but she's going to have to wait until we know her back is OK.



#36 concert andy

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:39 PM

Football players wear pads and helmets. Cheerleaders wear miniskirts and bows. At the state finals, one girl on the team got her nose broken. Then the final pyramid collapsed and another girl got her face stepped on. :shocked:

 

So now the season is over, and my daughter is in physical therapy for her back. The problem there is she went into this without ever having done any core strengthening exercises, and ended up being a base for shoulder stands. Everyone is starting the Insanity workout three days a week after school, but she's going to have to wait until we know her back is OK.

 

Hope she is ok (short and long term).

 

 

 

Many extracurricular activities that help kids develop life skills are very dangerous.



#37 jme

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:43 PM

god i hope my girls enjoy dancing enough not to want to go to cheerleading.

 

I really hope they want to play soccer, track / field, swimming, tennis, lacrosse, anything other than cheerleading.  

 

I will die on the inside.

 

also, I'm beyond thankful that I have girls.. no football, no baseball, no boys lacrosse, no hockey, AND most importantly, no football, baseball, lacrosse, hockey, PARENTS and COACHES.  :crazy:



#38 JBetty

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:46 PM

also, I'm beyond thankful that I have girls.. no football, no baseball, no boys lacrosse, no hockey, AND most importantly, no football, baseball, lacrosse, hockey, PARENTS and COACHES.   :crazy:

 

 

Don't fool yourself, jme.

Crappy parents and coaches invade all kids sports.

I've had to throw unruly parents out of high school swim meets.



#39 JBetty

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:49 PM

I've also seen the same type of attitudes in orchestra and chorus parents, but it's much more on the down low.

More like backstabbing than in your face screaming bullshit.

But the attitude is still there and the kids feel it, and it really sucks for them.



#40 concert andy

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:50 PM

god i hope my girls enjoy dancing enough not to want to go to cheerleading.

 

I really hope they want to play soccer, track / field, swimming, tennis, lacrosse, anything other than cheerleading.  

 

I will die on the inside.

 

also, I'm beyond thankful that I have girls.. no football, no baseball, no boys lacrosse, no hockey, AND most importantly, no football, baseball, lacrosse, hockey, PARENTS and COACHES.   :crazy:

 

 

Two examples:

 

Current coworker has daughter aged 13 playing volley ball.  Well she was at a tournament, and while she was on the sidelines she got hit in the head with a ball and it smacked her head into the bleachers (coaches moved the water supply for some reason next to the bleachers).  She now has concussion and been out of school for two weeks.  Slowly getting better but she had to see a specialist.  

 

My sister in Law played soccer, actually got a scholarship to play at GW (just graduated last May), but she had 2 ACL surgeries already.

 

 

Point is, all sports are dangerous.

 

Don't fool yourself, jme.

Crappy parents and coaches invade all kids sports.

I've had to throw unruly parents out of high school swim meets.

 

This is my point.  No matter the sport, it is dangerous, not as dangerous as some, especially when you have parents coaching.



#41 jme

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:58 PM

Oh, I know, I've been involved in / around in youth sports my whole life.    I've ejected parents from the stands of little league baseball games while umpiring.

 

Thankfully my brother is a coach in the area, and between my father's 45 years, and his experience now, I get to know which people, clubs, teams, etc to avoid, or to go towards.

 

yes, all sports are dangerous, to some extent.  However, there are studies out there telling us that running heads into one another is not a good idea.  Combine that with the fact that youth Football coaches for the most part ARE NOT TRAINED to understand this, and do not know how to teach the kids to avoid it.  

 

For me, you need to educate your self on the team and situation you put your kids in, and do your best to manage all that comes with that.  I don't trust the "violent" sport coaches at the youngest levels of youth sport, in this area.   I get knee injuries and head injuries happen, but I also feel that the culture of youth football and the sport itself lends to many more opportunities to create injuries, and not recognize the severity of them when they occur.   



#42 In A Silent Way

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 03:19 PM

I trust the cheerleading coach. She has a lot of experience. It's under the school athletic director in the state sports conference, and there are safety judges at the competitions. There's still nothing that prepares a walk-on freshman to have a 95-pound girl stand on her shoulders.

 

Fans are remarkably civil in our town. I've never seen problems at Little League, football, or swim meets, even with the crosstown rivals. Little League is very civil because kids are playing against classmates, and everybody knows each other. The rowdiest I've seen it was on Thanksgiving, when some kids from the other high school sat on our side of the field for the purpose of trolling. There was a cop stationed in front of that part of the bleachers to keep an eye on the festivities.



#43 concert andy

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 03:23 PM

Oh, I know, I've been involved in / around in youth sports my whole life.    I've ejected parents from the stands of little league baseball games while umpiring.

 

Thankfully my brother is a coach in the area, and between my father's 45 years, and his experience now, I get to know which people, clubs, teams, etc to avoid, or to go towards.

 

yes, all sports are dangerous, to some extent.  However, there are studies out there telling us that running heads into one another is not a good idea.  Combine that with the fact that youth Football coaches for the most part ARE NOT TRAINED to understand this, and do not know how to teach the kids to avoid it.  

 

For me, you need to educate your self on the team and situation you put your kids in, and do your best to manage all that comes with that.  I don't trust the "violent" sport coaches at the youngest levels of youth sport, in this area.   I get knee injuries and head injuries happen, but I also feel that the culture of youth football and the sport itself lends to many more opportunities to create injuries, and not recognize the severity of them when they occur.   

 

 

Good to know you have informed yourself about the situation.  That is all you can do, and then make the best decision.



#44 melissaphish

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 04:15 PM

No.

 

Fortunately, he shows no interest in the most contact-heavy sports. 



#45 melissaphish

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 04:17 PM

No.

 

Fortunately, he shows no interest in the most contact-heavy sports. 

 

He does play soccer though, and I worry about them heading the ball - their necks are just not strong enough at that age to handle that.



#46 BHC2352

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 08:03 PM

I played football for 8 years. Came back from a somewhat serious knee injury/surgery a bit earlier than I should have to not miss any games that season. Now...both of my knees are sort of screwed (and I'm only 31yo!), but that wasn't something you could have foretold at the time. I only suffered one concussion from football that I know of. It was fun, I'm an athletic guy, but there was no added bonus for me playing (some said above that it helped them graduate and work in a team setting). It didn't get me laid more, I already partied as much as anyone I knew at the time, we sucked and our coaches were a joke so there was no "team building" happening lol. In fact my whole individual experience of playing football throughout my life was pretty messed up. If I had to do it over again I would have focused on only basketball...I was actually pretty badass at that and couldn't have played college ball.

 

Having said that, I'd let my son play if he enojoyed it. However, I would spare his knees some unneeded bullsh*t and try to not let him play until he was a little older. Then of course you have to look at the coaching too. There are some real *ssholes that really have no business working with young folks. Sometimes even the ones who do care, and have good intentions, just aren't very good teachers. I think every situation would be different when deciding this as a parent.



#47 noro

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 08:25 PM

Yes. I would let my kids play football.



#48 williscat2000

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 11:27 PM

I loved playing football from 5th grade to 8th grade- I switched to soccer for high school- the seniors and juniors slamming into the freshman at practice scared the shit out of me...theese were like big adults crushing 9th graders...that being said- I made the decision myself not to play. For my kid- I would LOVE for him to play football- I love watching it- but i will be scared shitless that he doesn't hurt himself. I'd much rather he pick up the drums, but its important he learns on his own.