Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Should the USA compete in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia?


  • Please log in to reply
68 replies to this topic

#1 deadheadskier

deadheadskier
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,378 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 04:54 AM

http://talkingpoints...ng-olympics.php

 

 

Pretty draconian new Russian legislation and comments by Putin for gay athletes and spectators to essentially stay in the closet "or else" during the upcoming 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi.

 

 

:confused:



#2 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 02 August 2013 - 11:26 AM

Throw on top of that the recent shenanigans with Snowden....

 

Weird shit is going down right now...



#3 MeOmYo

MeOmYo
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,534 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 11:34 AM

Yes, putin is a window licker and everyone knows it.

#4 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:06 PM

Should we punish the athletes who have been training all their lives for this because the host country will enforce it's laws? No, I don't think it serves any useful purpose to boycott the games.



#5 williscat2000

williscat2000
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,452 posts
  • LocationNorthern NJ

Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:21 PM

yes we should participate- raise the flag and show the world how we roll



#6 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:24 PM

yes we should participate- raise the flag and show the world how we roll

 

Would be kinda funny if we technically followed their rules ie not telling who's gay or not, and then walked in with some sort of rainbow attire. Or our uniforms had rainbow, or something. 



#7 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,432 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:36 PM

My first thought was Johnny Wier will do something...  Quick google search, presto.

 

Will Johnny Weir wear a rainbow pin to the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics?

#8 Julius

Julius
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,365 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 02:28 PM

Politically speaking, as disgusting as it is, this is an internal Russian matter so I would be against a boycott. Too many innocent athletes would get hurt by such a move. 



#9 Feck

Feck
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,761 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 02:57 PM

kind of like boycoting Stoli, which is made in Latvia ?
i understand the protest, but they might be doing it wrong

#10 TEO

TEO

    VibeGuide

  • VibeGuide
  • 23,164 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 06:41 PM

So it is okay to boycott U.S. businesses, but not another country over sports games, got it.



#11 MeOmYo

MeOmYo
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,534 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 06:47 PM

So it is okay to boycott U.S. businesses, but not another country over sports games, got it.

 

are you eluding to boycotting liquor stores that sell Stoli?



#12 Feck

Feck
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,761 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 06:58 PM

 
So it is okay to boycott U.S. businesses, but not another country over sports games, got it.
 


i'm saying they might be boycotting the wrong thing for the right reasons

Stolichnaya Vodka, the label targeted by the gay Russian vodka boycott, is actually produced in Riga, Latvia — which is why gay Latvians are pleading with gay bars and LGBT people all around the world to stop blacklisting the brand. Last we checked in, the gay bar boycott of Stoli had spread worldwide, with bars from Vancouver to London swearing off the stuff.

Despite the ban, there's little sign that Russia is feeling the heat. That can't be said of Latvia, a country caught in the crossfire.

http://www.theatlant...ng-stoli/67905/

#13 Feck

Feck
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,761 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 07:32 PM

Darya Klishina is another reason we shouldn't boycot the games - just sayin.
;)

#14 Uncle Coulro

Uncle Coulro
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,563 posts

Posted 02 August 2013 - 10:51 PM

Darya Klishina is another reason we shouldn't boycot the games - just sayin.
;)

Does she compete in winter sports? 



#15 deadheadskier

deadheadskier
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,378 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 05:49 AM

Should we punish the athletes who have been training all their lives for this because the host country will enforce it's laws? No, I don't think it serves any useful purpose to boycott the games.

 

A or B

 

What is the harsher punishment.

 

A.  An athlete can not play a game in the sport that they've strived their entire life to be the best in the world at due to,,national political boycott.

 

or 

 

B. Gay athletes have to compete "in the closet" or else risk being beaten or incarcerated in a foreign nation for being openly gay.  

 

So basically, you think the gays should sit out so the straight US athletes can compete and have a good time?

 

Hypothetically speaking, if the Olympics prior to last year were held in Qatar or Saudi Arabia where Sharia Law had ruled even during the Olympics, would you have been cool with only men being allowed to compete in the games?

 

Would you view a boycott of such games as "punishment" of the male athletes because the women athletes desired to be women and couldn't help themselves from openly expressing who they are?



#16 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 03 August 2013 - 12:09 PM


 

 

Hypothetically speaking, if the Olympics prior to last year were held in Qatar or Saudi Arabia where Sharia Law had ruled even during the Olympics, would you have been cool with only men being allowed to compete in the games?

 

Would you view a boycott of such games as "punishment" of the male athletes because the women athletes desired to be women and couldn't help themselves from openly expressing who they are?

 

 

:clap:  Excellent analogy. 

 

It's so incredibly sad that an event that is supposed to unite even enemies, for the sake of athletic competition, ends up in a pissing war over politics and religion. 

 

I recently signed a petition to move the olympics to Canada. 



#17 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 12:21 PM

A or B

 

What is the harsher punishment.

 

A.  An athlete can not play a game in the sport that they've strived their entire life to be the best in the world at due to,,national political boycott.

 

or 

 

B. Gay athletes have to compete "in the closet" or else risk being beaten or incarcerated in a foreign nation for being openly gay.  

 

So basically, you think the gays should sit out so the straight US athletes can compete and have a good time?

 

Hypothetically speaking, if the Olympics prior to last year were held in Qatar or Saudi Arabia where Sharia Law had ruled even during the Olympics, would you have been cool with only men being allowed to compete in the games?

 

Would you view a boycott of such games as "punishment" of the male athletes because the women athletes desired to be women and couldn't help themselves from openly expressing who they are?

Yes, that's exactly what I think. Clearly I believe all the gay athletes shouldn't be allowed to participate. The figure skaters should at least be beaten because hey, it doesn't get anymore gay than dressing up and prancing around in sequin outfits.

 

Watching that stuff really threatens my manhood  :rolleyes:



#18 TEO

TEO

    VibeGuide

  • VibeGuide
  • 23,164 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 01:55 PM

Train one's "whole life" to be the temporary best at a sporting event, and this can only be proved once every four years at specific games, interesting life priority.  I need to be number one, no matter the moral/social injustices to which I turn a blind eye.  Perhaps steel cage matches have more merit than I originally thought.

 

Are they not Olympic TEAMS?



#19 deadheadskier

deadheadskier
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,378 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 02:28 PM

Yes, that's exactly what I think. Clearly I believe all the gay athletes shouldn't be allowed to participate. The figure skaters should at least be beaten because hey, it doesn't get anymore gay than dressing up and prancing around in sequin outfits.

 

Watching that stuff really threatens my manhood  :rolleyes:

 

Instead of mocking my comments, why don't you explain how I should view your prior comments as something other than what I interpreted them as.  I read that comment as you feel the USA should compete and if our gay athletes want to be a part of the team that they should respect Russian law and remain in the closet for the games.  



#20 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 04:17 PM

You're reading all kinds of shit into that article that just isn't there and seem intent on making this into something it isn't. Seriously dude, where does it say anything about "competing in the closet or risk being beaten?" 

 

Did you miss these parts of the article

 

 

“An athlete of nontraditional sexual orientation isn’t banned from coming to Sochi,” Vitaly Mutko said in an interview with R-Sport, the sports newswire of state news agency RIA Novosti. “But if he goes out into the streets and starts to propagandize, then of course he will be held accountable.”

 

Mutko emphasized that the law wasn’t designed to punish anyone for being gay or lesbian. But like the Russian lawmakers who authored the bill, Mutko said athletes would be punished only for propaganda, a word that remains ambiguous under the new law.

 

“The corresponding law doesn’t forbid non-traditional orientation, but other things: propaganda, involvement of minors and the youth.”

 

 

 

The IOC said last week that it had received assurances “from the highest level of government in Russia that the legislation will not affect those attending or taking part in the games.” It pledged to ensure there would be no discrimination against athletes, officials, spectators and the media in Sochi.

 

 

 

But do go on reading what you want into it and continue to believe that those of us who feel that a boycott is wrong really think that "the gays should sit out so the straight US athletes can compete and have a good time."

 

And remember, we're Americans and our way of life is all that matters, we have the right to go into any country we want and do whatever we choose because the laws of other countries mean shit unless we agree with them.



#21 scarfire

scarfire
  • VibeTribe
  • 1,432 posts
  • Locationmatzah pizza

Posted 03 August 2013 - 04:22 PM

they should compete openly. imagine the outrage and financial loss after putin jails his first gay athlete. 



#22 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 03 August 2013 - 04:29 PM

Joker, it's also been noted in various articles that the new Russian law includes clothing or any attire that could promote gays, so anything that could even resemble a rainbow can be skewed to fit that bill. It's one of those catch-alls that, if someone were inclined, could be used to unnecessarily fine/arrest someone. No, I don't think he's reading into it. It's not the only article that discusses that, either. Others have been included in this thread as well. 



#23 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 04:45 PM

I don't see how they could compete as openly gay during an event, what could they really do that would be any different than a straight person competing?

 

As was made clear in the article

 

The IOC said last week that it had received assurances “from the highest level of government in Russia that the legislation will not affect those attending or taking part in the games.” It pledged to ensure there would be no discrimination against athletes, officials, spectators and the media in Sochi.

 

Nobody is being forced to go, if folks want to chance purposely breaking the laws of the host country then that's their own business and it should be on them. However the rest of the team shouldn't be denied the opportunity to compete and to do their own thing either.



#24 deadheadskier

deadheadskier
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,378 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 05:23 PM


Did you miss these parts of the article

 

 

“An athlete of nontraditional sexual orientation isn’t banned from coming to Sochi,” Vitaly Mutko said in an interview with R-Sport, the sports newswire of state news agency RIA Novosti. “But if he goes out into the streets and starts to propagandize, then of course he will be held accountable.”

 

Mutko emphasized that the law wasn’t designed to punish anyone for being gay or lesbian. But like the Russian lawmakers who authored the bill, Mutko said athletes would be punished only for propaganda, a word that remains ambiguous under the new law.

 

“The corresponding law doesn’t forbid non-traditional orientation, but other things: propaganda, involvement of minors and the youth.”

 

 

I didn't miss that part Jack and as the article states, there's a lot of ambiguity regarding what "propaganda" means under the law.  I think further clarification is warranted.

 

I don't see how they could compete as openly gay during an event, what could they really do that would be any different than a straight person competing?

 

As was made clear in the article

 

The IOC said last week that it had received assurances “from the highest level of government in Russia that the legislation will not affect those attending or taking part in the games.” It pledged to ensure there would be no discrimination against athletes, officials, spectators and the media in Sochi.

 

Nobody is being forced to go, if folks want to chance purposely breaking the laws of the host country then that's their own business and it should be on them. However the rest of the team shouldn't be denied the opportunity to compete and to do their own thing either.

 

What could they do that's different than a straight person?

 

 What happens all the time at sporting events at any level when someone is victorious?  Athletes share their joy with loved ones. The scene of an athlete embracing and kissing a spouse/partner happens all the time at athletic competitions.

 

So, if that plays out and a gay athlete kisses their partner, is that considered a punishable offense under the new law?  

 

Despite the assurances of the IOC, I don't know how a gay individual (athlete, spectator, even a Russian citizen) could feel comfortable standing on Russian soil right now.  



#25 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:34 PM

And?

 

Look, you asked if the US should compete, some of us said yes and then you turned that into us saying we "think the gays should sit out so the straight US athletes can compete and have a good time."  

 

Where the fuck does that come from?

 

Personally I don't care what they do but they're guests in a foreign country and they're aware of the law. They should be careful to abide by it or expect to face the consequences of disobeying it, just like any other law.

 

When we host the Olympics or any other event do we allow competitors to violate our laws? Of course not, so why should we expect other countries to do so? 



#26 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 03 August 2013 - 08:13 PM

 

 

 

Hypothetically speaking, if the Olympics prior to last year were held in Qatar or Saudi Arabia where Sharia Law had ruled even during the Olympics, would you have been cool with only men being allowed to compete in the games?

 

 

I'd like to reiterate this example. Gay isn't as extreme (to some people) as gender. 

 

So what if this WERE the case? Are we still supposed to abide by the "law of the land" or let another country deny and oppress our fellow Americans????



#27 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,432 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 03 August 2013 - 08:16 PM

And?

 

Look, you asked if the US should compete, some of us said yes and then you turned that into us saying we "think the gays should sit out so the straight US athletes can compete and have a good time."  

 

Where the fuck does that come from?

 

Personally I don't care what they do but they're guests in a foreign country and they're aware of the law. They should be careful to abide by it or expect to face the consequences of disobeying it, just like any other law.

 

When we host the Olympics or any other event do we allow competitors to violate our laws? Of course not, so why should we expect other countries to do so? 

 

Isn't that the point?  To point out the flaws in the host countries laws?  The host country has to know the world is watching them.  See China Olympics, See upcoming Brazil World Cup, etc..  Many examples of host country politics getting in the way of a sporting event.

 

Remember History teaches us lessons, how about Hitler who thought whites were the superior race and then Jesse Owens won.  While it did not change his views, it did of many other HUMANS on this planet.  Hitler was highly embarrassed by this as I recall.

 

Also, remember the athletes were welcomed and not subject to Germany's oppressive laws of 1936 either.

 

 

The current threat of a boycott may help change those laws.  MONEY TALKS!

 

Or may be Gay athletes winning there, or celebrating however they wish, these events may help change those laws.

 

 

How are Russia's / Putin's stance different?  (oppressing a subset of the population)

 

Although pressure abroad did not help Pussy Riot, it may help the masses.  Big difference in specific individuals rights, as compared to a portion of the population rights.

 

Also, remember we boycotted the Russian Summer Olympics in 1980, and they in turn boycotted the 1984 Summer Olympics.  There is precedent.



#28 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:05 PM

I'd like to reiterate this example. Gay isn't as extreme (to some people) as gender. 

 

So what if this WERE the case? Are we still supposed to abide by the "law of the land" or let another country deny and oppress our fellow Americans????

 

I'd imagine we still have the right to simply refuse to go to any country we choose not to visit. If people don't like the laws of a country they're free not to go there, then there's no worries about being denied or oppressed by that country. We have no right to tell others we don't like your laws so we refuse to abide by them just like they don't have the right to come here and violate our laws without consequence.

 

Andy, I'm pretty sure that even though some choose to make it a political event, the Olympics are first and foremost about putting politics aside for the athletic competition.



#29 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,432 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:17 PM

Joker I agree with your response to me. But it is always political. Especially now a days.

As for the response to hippyskichick:
What about the fans or loved ones or even significant other of an athlete either of who who may be gay Should they not go?

#30 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:31 PM

I'd say it's a personal decision. The government has promised that the law won't affect those attending or taking part so I would think they'd be ok. That said if someone chooses to make a scene in order to make a political statement then they should expect to get the Pussy Riot treatment.



#31 Julius

Julius
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,365 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:51 PM

Joker I agree with part of your sentiment but not the other. I'd like to see some sort of unified civil disobedience action flaunting gayness as a huge FUCK YOU to Putin that publicly embarrasses him but he can't do diddlyshit about because it involves so many athletes. 

 

He's trying to score political points with this stuff so the way to fight it is to rob him of that. 



#32 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,432 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 03 August 2013 - 10:05 PM

Also agree but is a couple simply holding hands on a sight seeing trip in the wrong neighborhood a political statement?

#33 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 03 August 2013 - 10:52 PM

Joker I agree with part of your sentiment but not the other. I'd like to see some sort of unified civil disobedience action flaunting gayness as a huge FUCK YOU to Putin that publicly embarrasses him but he can't do diddlyshit about because it involves so many athletes. 

 

He's trying to score political points with this stuff so the way to fight it is to rob him of that. 

I'd love to see it too but those involved should be aware that the shit could hit the fan. I'd be worried Putin is the kind if dick that would turn around, say, "fuck me? no fuck you" then turn around and start locking everyone up.

 

Could be Andy but again, they said it wouldn't affect the attendees/athletes so I couldn't say what they'd consider to be over the line.

 

We've got a government here that still discriminates against the LGBT community, perhaps it would be better if these types of protests were directed towards our own laws first there'd be more of a leg to stand on when it comes to protesting another countries laws.

 

Of course that would mean protesting against Obama, who could end that discrimination with an executive order but refuses to do so.

 

 

An Important Step toward Workplace Equality: An Executive Order on Federal Contractors

 

Employment discrimination continues to be a critical problem facing the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community. It remains legal to fire or refuse to hire someone based on his or her sexual orientation in more than half the country – 29 states – and to base those same employment decisions on someone’s gender identity in 33 states.  Far too many LGBT people cannot be honestly themselves without fear of losing their livelihoods.

Workplace_WorkplaceEqualityExecutiveOrde

The Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA), federal legislation that would prohibit anti-LGBT workplace discrimination, remains critically needed to address this enormous inequality.  Unfortunately, the current climate in Washington, D.C. makes passage of ENDA in the short term unlikely.  There is another option, however, that could protect millions more American workers from unjust discrimination – an executive order on federal contractors.  By issuing such an order, the President would not only create fairer workplaces across the country, he would demonstrate to Congress that adopting federal employment protections for LGBT people is good policy and good for business.

 

 

Protecting Millions More Workers

 

An executive order would prohibit companies that contract with the federal government from discriminating in employment based on sexual orientation and gender identity.  Federal contractors employ more than 20 percent of the American workforce and earn around $500 billion from federal taxpayers every year.  According to the Williams Institute, an executive order would extend LGBT-inclusive employment protections to 16 million more workers.

 


#34 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,432 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 04 August 2013 - 01:21 AM

Are you comparing Russia's law's to US workplace discrimination?

 

While both are a form of discrimination, I do not see them as even being close to the same thing.  

 

 

 

Read about how bad it is over there.  This was published says ago.

 

A TERRIBLE TIME TO BE GAY IN RUSSIA

http://www.newyorker...-in-russia.html

 


#35 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 04 August 2013 - 01:37 AM

http://www.buzzfeed....ne-needs-to-see

 

Laws or not, there is no reason in any case, anywhere, where a person deserves to be beaten to a bloody pulp just because of who they are/what they look like/gender/etc. 

 

Abiding by laws is one thing; blatant disregard for human rights is another. it's not just the government, either. There are a large number of people in Russia who are violently against gays. Standing up for what you believe is great - beating the fucking shit out of someone who disagrees/pisses you off is unacceptable. 

 

The US has boycotted the Olympics before over human rights issues (Hitler era, etc) so what makes this so "less" of a crime that we can't boycott?  (just for the record, I'm not comparing the severity of persecuted Jews to gay rights. Just pointing out the human rights/violence similarities...)

 

 

Personally, even if, as an athlete, even if the Olympics were my life dream, as a straight person I'd have a really hard time going, knowing what kind of creeps I'm around. But that's just me. 



#36 Depends

Depends
  • VibeTribe
  • 12,044 posts

Posted 04 August 2013 - 05:03 AM

two words:

Jesse Owens

 

Should the US have boycotted the Berlin Olympics in '36?

Most would have said yes, with today's eyes.  But the beauty of Jesse Owens beating "the pure race" in the FatherLand would never had happened.

 

I think there is a chance for history to be made.  



#37 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 04 August 2013 - 12:49 PM

So I looked into this a little more and it's clearly getting rather ugly over there. While I believe there should be more international pressure put on them I still don't think an Olympic boycott is the way to go.

 

And NO that doesn't mean I think our gay athletes should sit out so that the straights can have a good time. 



#38 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,432 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 07 August 2013 - 09:01 PM

This story is now on the front page of ESPN.  



#39 TEO

TEO

    VibeGuide

  • VibeGuide
  • 23,164 posts

Posted 07 August 2013 - 09:32 PM

If it were me, I would want to participate and would keep my sexual preferences on lock down.  

In my professional life, there are people who make appointments based on reputation and are surprised to discover my gender during our first meeting.

Yes, discrimination is alive and kicking on many levels.



#40 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,831 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 07 August 2013 - 11:56 PM

In my professional life, there are people who make appointments based on reputation and are surprised to discover my gender during our first meeting.

Yes, discrimination is alive and kicking on many levels.

 

 

This is me. Plus the age thing. The position I have right now, and have for almost 5 years, is typically for much older males. (Instructor at a nuclear facility...)



#41 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 10 August 2013 - 12:14 PM

  President Obama says no to a boycott of 2014 Sochi Olympics

 

The United States Olympic Committee, saying the Games "bring people together," was pleased to hear that President Barack Obama said there should be no boycott of the 2014 Sochi Games despite differences with the host nation.

 

U.S. disputes with Russia include the granting of temporary asylum to Edward Snowden (who leaked national security documents), recent anti-gay legislation and support for Syria's president in a bloody civil war.

 

“I do not think it's appropriate to boycott the Olympics,” Obama told reporters during a news conference at the White House on Friday. “We've got a bunch of Americans out there who are training hard, who are doing everything they can to succeed.”

 

 

More

http://www.latimes.c...y#axzz2bZBhnw9g

 

 

Should we punish the athletes who have been training all their lives for this because the host country will enforce it's laws? No, I don't think it serves any useful purpose to boycott the games.

 

 

 

I am the change you hoped for

 

anti_obama_joker_poster-rdfb18f7b9f494a4

 



#42 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,432 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 10 August 2013 - 09:55 PM

  President Obama says no to a boycott of 2014 Sochi Olympics

 

The United States Olympic Committee, saying the Games "bring people together," was pleased to hear that President Barack Obama said there should be no boycott of the 2014 Sochi Games despite differences with the host nation.

 

U.S. disputes with Russia include the granting of temporary asylum to Edward Snowden (who leaked national security documents), recent anti-gay legislation and support for Syria's president in a bloody civil war.

 

“I do not think it's appropriate to boycott the Olympics,” Obama told reporters during a news conference at the White House on Friday. “We've got a bunch of Americans out there who are training hard, who are doing everything they can to succeed.”

 

 

More

http://www.latimes.c...y#axzz2bZBhnw9g

 

 

 

 

 

I am the change you hoped for

 

anti_obama_joker_poster-rdfb18f7b9f494a4

 

 

 

So you agree with the president?  There is a first.  :lol:



#43 hoagie

hoagie
  • VibeTribe
  • 19,454 posts

Posted 11 August 2013 - 12:18 AM

You're reading all kinds of shit into that article that just isn't there and seem intent on making this into something it isn't. Seriously dude, where does it say anything about "competing in the closet or risk being beaten?" 

 

Did you miss these parts of the article

 

 

“An athlete of nontraditional sexual orientation isn’t banned from coming to Sochi,” Vitaly Mutko said in an interview with R-Sport, the sports newswire of state news agency RIA Novosti. “But if he goes out into the streets and starts to propagandize, then of course he will be held accountable.”

 

Mutko emphasized that the law wasn’t designed to punish anyone for being gay or lesbian. But like the Russian lawmakers who authored the bill, Mutko said athletes would be punished only for propaganda, a word that remains ambiguous under the new law.

 

“The corresponding law doesn’t forbid non-traditional orientation, but other things: propaganda, involvement of minors and the youth.”

 

 

 

The IOC said last week that it had received assurances “from the highest level of government in Russia that the legislation will not affect those attending or taking part in the games.” It pledged to ensure there would be no discrimination against athletes, officials, spectators and the media in Sochi.

 

 

 

But do go on reading what you want into it and continue to believe that those of us who feel that a boycott is wrong really think that "the gays should sit out so the straight US athletes can compete and have a good time."

 

And remember, we're Americans and our way of life is all that matters, we have the right to go into any country we want and do whatever we choose because the laws of other countries mean shit unless we agree with them.

add this tho...

 

"If Johnny Weir does anything during the 2104 Sochi Winter Olympics to acknowledge his husband in the presence of children (virtual presence or otherwise), then Johnny Weir and his husband Victor are going to jail.

That means Weir’s husband had better not be in attendance during his Olympic competitions, and he’d better not be by Weir’s side at any medal ceremonies, or any other venues in which children are either present, or watching on TV.  Or Johnny Weir and his husband are going to jail for breaking Russian law, which is quite broad in its definition of what constitutes a public display of homosexuality."

 

That's just wrong and fucked up.  So, would you break Russian Law here?  Tough spot...



#44 TEO

TEO

    VibeGuide

  • VibeGuide
  • 23,164 posts

Posted 11 August 2013 - 01:35 PM

Signs of protest

 

1003749_724329420929847_1703363703_n.jpg



#45 concert andy

concert andy
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,432 posts
  • LocationPhilly

Posted 16 August 2013 - 05:58 PM

Skater Johnny Weir willing to get arrested at Russian Olympics Anti-gay laws could lead to protests, confrontations at Winter Games.


Read more at http://www.philly.co...VEZ4msilVuQ8.99



#46 Joker

Joker
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,632 posts

Posted 16 August 2013 - 06:14 PM

So you agree with the president?  There is a first.  :lol:

 

:lol:

 

I agreed with many of his "promises" it's what he's actually done that pisses me off



#47 jnjn

jnjn
  • VibeTribe
  • 6,934 posts

Posted 16 August 2013 - 06:56 PM

A or B

 

What is the harsher punishment.

 

A.  An athlete can not play a game in the sport that they've strived their entire life to be the best in the world at due to,,national political boycott.

 

or 

 

B. Gay athletes have to compete "in the closet" or else risk being beaten or incarcerated in a foreign nation for being openly gay.  

 

So basically, you think the gays should sit out so the straight US athletes can compete and have a good time?

 

Hypothetically speaking, if the Olympics prior to last year were held in Qatar or Saudi Arabia where Sharia Law had ruled even during the Olympics, would you have been cool with only men being allowed to compete in the games?

 

Would you view a boycott of such games as "punishment" of the male athletes because the women athletes desired to be women and couldn't help themselves from openly expressing who they are?

 

that's a poor comparison...no where have i read that lgbt athletes are banned from competing.

 

if an athlete chooses not to attend that's their choice, but forcing them not to attend via a boycott is wrong, imo.

also, let's not forget that this isn't just sport & "games" & representing their nation...this is their livelihood.



#48 hoagie

hoagie
  • VibeTribe
  • 19,454 posts

Posted 17 August 2013 - 08:56 PM

It would be strange to boycott these games after not having boycotted the 1936 Hitler Games.  Would be REALLY weird....



#49 deadheadskier

deadheadskier
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,378 posts

Posted 18 August 2013 - 05:19 AM

I think it's even weirder to draw comparisons of current social/political choices to those made 77 years ago.  Different time, different world.



#50 Tabbooma

Tabbooma
  • VibeTribe
  • 23,647 posts

Posted 18 August 2013 - 02:06 PM

Boycott only if they invade Afghanistan... Hmmmmmmm... Tabbooma says Boycott ;)