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#101 Joker

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 02:23 PM

Nobel Peace Prize may recognize Arab Spring activists


The Peace Research Institute Oslo has predicted that some of the cyber activists who played important roles in the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions are in line for the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize. Every year, this Norway based organization speculates on who will win this prestigious award. And with the Arab Spring dominating the headlines this year, they think it

#102 Joker

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 05:13 PM

Three women's rights activists share Nobel Peace Prize


Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, activist Leymah Gbowee of Liberia and rights activist Tawakkul Karman of Yemen share this year's Nobel Peace Prize, the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced Friday.

They were chosen "for their nonviolent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work," the committee said in Oslo, Norway.

"We cannot achieve democracy and lasting peace in the world unless women obtain the same opportunities as men to influence developments at all levels of society."

In an interview with CNN, Karman -- the first Arab woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize and one of the youngest recipients -- said she heard the news while demonstrating in the Yemeni capital, Sanaa.

"Congratulations to all the Yemeni people. I am so happy for the award. I believe this award is for all Yemenis, for all the Yemeni people, and for all Arab women," she said.

"This is a victory for peace in the Arab world, a victory for the peaceful revolution in Yemen."

A closer look at the Nobel Peace Prize

Johnson Sirleaf, Liberia's 72-year-old president and Africa's first elected female head of state, told CNN she was excited about the prize, which she said was shared by all her country's people.

"I'm accepting this on behalf of the Liberian people, so credit goes to them," she said. "For the past eight years, we have had peace and each and every one of them has contributed to this peace."

She said the peace that had ended 14 years of civil war should be attributed to the country's women.

They were "women from all walks of life who challenged the dictatorship of former President Charles Taylor and who stayed out in the sun and the rain working for peace in our country," she said.

Johnson Sirleaf, whose political resilience and tough reputation have earned her the nickname "Iron Lady," is campaigning for re-election.

The Harvard graduate's commencement address in high school in 1972 sharply criticized the government, a rare defiance in Africa, especially at the time. She has also worked at the World Bank and the United Nations.

Her historic 2006 election win was a major milestone for Africa, a continent dominated by male dictators who are referred to as strongmen. The mother of four sons published a book, "This Child Will Be Great" in 2008.

Liberian Information Minister Cletus Sieh told CNN that Johnson Sirleaf is a role model for many women in Africa.

More
http://articles.cnn....ion?_s=PM:WORLD

#103 Joker

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 12:11 AM

Pacifists protest possible war against Iran

NEW YORK

#104 Joker

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 10:55 PM

All Out for NO WAR ON IRAN during AIPAC Convention
February 10th, 2012

#105 Joker

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 12:33 AM

George Clooney arrested: how his protest could help Sudan

George Clooney was arrested Friday during a protest designed to draw attention to conditions in Sudan. With his star power, Clooney might just succeed.

Actor George Clooney and his father Nick Clooney were arrested Friday outside the Sudanese Embassy in Washington. They were participating in a protest meant to bring attention to what Mr. Clooney and fellow activists term a growing and needless humanitarian crisis in Sudan.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir is blocking food aid from entering the Nuba Mountains in his country

#106 china cat

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 12:37 AM



#107 Joker

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 10:40 AM

Memorial Day’s history stretches back to 1868

Memorial Day has offered a day to remember the sacrifices of veterans since its creation in 1868.




Today is the day we observe Memorial Day.

In 1868, Gen. John Logan, national commander of the Grand Old Republic, proclaimed Memorial Day as a day to place flowers on the graves of soldiers at Arlington Cemetery.

For years, Memorial Day was celebrated May 30. Then, in 1971, Congress passed the National Holiday Act moving most federal holidays to Mondays to ensure a three-day weekend. Since that time, Memorial Day has been observed on the last Monday in May.

Originally, the day was to honor soldiers who died fighting the Civil War. However, since World War I, it has been a time to honor all members of the military who have died in war. This editorial published in The Oklahoman on May 30, 1912, refers to those who died in the Civil War, but the message the anonymous writer expresses of honoring the dead and the hope for peace still rings true.

“Today a mighty nation pauses to put wreaths on the graves of soldiers. It is a day of thoughts that pertain to the bivouac of the dead.

Flags will be displayed at half mast; mourning will be in use; bells will toll.

Over on the hill where marble shafts mark the resting place of those who fell in the conflict where brother was arrayed against brother, flowers will be placed. The living will not forget the dead.

It is a day of sorrow. The older among us can realize the horrors which the day recalls. The younger generation cannot understand.

Today we should be reminded of peace. If the peace movement had been as strong in 1860 as it is today the nation would not have been plunged into civil strife. Memorial Day should impress upon us the horrors of war, it should make that impression so deep that the peace ofthe world will be assured.”

Since the Civil War, Americans have lost their lives serving in the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Persian Gulf War, the Iraq War and now the Afghanistan War.

In December of 2000, President Bill Clinton signed the National Moment of Remembrance Act into law designating
3 p.m. local time as the moment for a grateful nation to pause and remember.

This is a part of the statement released at the signing:

“Each Memorial Day, the Nation honors those Americans who died while defending our Nation and its values. While these heroes should be honored every day for their profound contribution to securing our Nation’s freedom, they and their families should be especially honored on Memorial Day. The observance of a National Moment of Remembrance is a simple and unifying way to commemorate our history and honor the struggle to protect our freedoms.”

Please take at least a minute today and remember the husbands, wives, fathers, mothers, sons and daughters who have given their lives for their country.

Let us never forget.


Read more: http://newsok.com/me...3#ixzz1w9wbXWuL

#108 Joker

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 07:31 PM

Activist Glen Milner: Navy's Freedom Defenders Out to Sink Seattle's Peace Fleet Demonstration

The Navy's war fleet arrives in Elliott Bay today and, as usual, Seattle's Peace Fleet will be there to greet them - at a distance. It's the annual Seafair standoff, in which the Navy displays its weapons to defend democracy while the U.S. Coast Guard enforces a 500-yard no-protest zone around Pier 66 to keep peaceful dissenters at bay.

"Why would we demonstrate for peace at a Seattle maritime festival?" says Leonard Eiger, of the Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action. "Because the celebration of warships in our harbor helps bring about the normalcy of modern war."

He calls the the Seafair fleet arrival "a public relations and recruiting event" for the Navy. A violation of the safety zone by demonstrators buzzing the ships in their rubber boats could result in arrest and up to six years in jail and/or a $250,000 fine.

Longtime Seattle activist Glen Milner tells us that besides the Navy's 500-yard rule, demonstrators will likely again be prevented by the Port of Seattle from accessing the high-profile rooftop area of Pier 66, in further attempt to limit exposure of their protest to the public and media.

"It seems our 'defenders of freedom' do not much care for what freedom looks like when it is standing next to them," says Milner.

The government doesn't care much for Milner either. A 2010 Justice Department reportrevealed that the feds secretly investigated the Seattle peacenik and other U.S.activists over a five-year period, wasting what an inspector general said was time and money to determine if the activists were subversives.

The FBI also improperly retained information in its files on Milner and others and classified some acts of nonviolent civil disobedience as acts of terrorism.

But then Milner, who was SW's Best of Seattle "Best Citizen" last year after winning an important U.S. Supreme Court records battle with the feds, doesn't care much for the government either.

The Port, for one, has been actively trying to limit his group's demonstrations, spurring his interest in the Port's operations. In the past, he learned that a Port police officer, pretending to be a sympathizer, had attended one of his group's Seafair protest planning sessions. More recently he learned the Port had been giving away services to Seafair and the Navy for the fleet arrival, leading the state auditor to conclude the agency should charge the full amount for berthage rates while the ships are in Seattle.

In light of the Port's Seafair support, Milner says it seems hypocritical of the agency to oppose the proposed new SoDo sports arena, claiming it will increase traffic congestion and delay local commerce.


"Hundreds of hours are spent by Port of Seattle personnel for the Navy's largest military recruitment display in our region," he says, leading to increased traffic congestion, not to mention clogging up Elliott Bay and tying up scarce downtown resources.

"If the Port really wanted to free up operations for commerce," Milner says, "they would send the Navy fleet to Tacoma."

http://blogs.seattle...r_navys_fre.php

#109 Joker

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 03:07 PM

TL;DR...fuck that...This shit is important


:joker:


After Latest NDAA Challenge Hearing, Thoughts on the Criminalization of Dissent



I was on the 15th floor of the Southern U.S. District Court in New York in the courtroom of Judge Katherine Forrest on Tuesday. It was the final hearing in the lawsuit I brought in January against President Barack Obama and Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta. I filed the suit, along with lawyers Carl J. Mayer and Bruce I. Afran, over Section 1021 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). We were late joined by six co-plaintiffs including Noam Chomsky and Daniel Ellsberg.

This section of the NDAA, signed into law by Obama on Dec. 31, 2011, obliterates some of our most important constitutional protections. It authorizes the executive branch to order the military to seize U.S. citizens deemed to be terrorists or associated with terrorists. Those taken into custody by the military, which becomes under the NDAA a domestic law enforcement agency, can be denied due process and habeas corpus and held indefinitely in military facilities. Any activist or dissident, whose rights were once protected under the First Amendment, can be threatened under this law with indefinite incarceration in military prisons, including our offshore penal colonies. The very name of the law itself—the Homeland Battlefield Bill—suggests the totalitarian credo of endless war waged against enemies within "the homeland" as well as those abroad.

"The essential thrust of the NDAA is to create a system of justice that violates the separation of powers," Mayer told the court. "[The Obama administration has] taken detention out of the judicial branch and put it under the executive branch."

In May, Judge Forrest issued a temporary injunction invalidating Section 1021 as a violation of the First and Fifth amendments. It was a courageous decision. Forrest will decide within a couple of weeks whether she will make the injunction permanent.

In last week's proceeding, the judge, who appeared from her sharp questioning of government attorneys likely to nullify the section, cited the forced internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II as a precedent she did not want to follow. Forrest read to the courtroom a dissenting opinion by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson in Korematsu v. United States, a ruling that authorized the detention during the war of some 110,00 Japanese-Americans in government "relocation camps."

"[E]ven if they were permissible military procedures, I deny that it follows that they are constitutional," Jackson wrote in his 1944 dissent. "If, as the Court holds, it does follow, then we may as well say that any military order will be constitutional, and have done with it."

Barack Obama's administration has appealed Judge Forrest's temporary injunction and would certainly appeal a permanent injunction. It is a stunning admission by this president that he will do nothing to protect our constitutional rights. The administration's added failure to restore habeas corpus, its use of the Espionage Act six times to silence government whistle-blowers, its support of the FISA Amendment Act—which permits warrantless wiretapping, monitoring and eavesdropping on U.S. citizens—and its ordering of the assassination of U.S. citizens under the 2001 Authorization to Use Military Force, or AUMF, is a signal that for all his rhetoric Obama, like his Republican rivals, is determined to remove every impediment to the unchecked power of the security and surveillance state. I and the six other plaintiffs, who include reporters, professors and activists, will most likely have to continue this fight in an appellate court and perhaps the Supreme Court.

The language of the bill is terrifyingly vague. It defines a "covered person"—one subject to detention—as "a person who was a part of or substantially supported al-Qaeda, the Taliban, or associated forces that are engaged in hostilities against the United States or its coalition partners, including any person who has committed a belligerent act or has directly supported such hostilities in aid of such enemy forces." The bill, however, does not define the terms "substantially supported," "directly supported" or "associated forces." In defiance of more than 200 earlier laws of domestic policing, this act holds that any member of a group deemed by the state to be a terrorist organization, whether it is a Palestinian charity or a Black Bloc anarchist unit, can be seized and held by the military. Mayer stressed this point in the court Wednesday when he cited the sedition convictions of peace activists during World War I who distributed leaflets calling to end the war by halting the manufacturing of munitions. Mayer quoted Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes' dissenting 1919 opinion. We need to "be eternally vigilant against attempts to check the expression of opinions that we loathe," the justice wrote.

The Justice Department's definition of a potential terrorism suspect under the Patriot Act is already extremely broad. It includes anyone with missing fingers, someone who has weatherproof ammunition and guns, and anyone who has hoarded more than seven days of food. This would make a few of my relatives in rural Maine and their friends, if the government so decided, prime terrorism suspects.


Assistant U.S. Attorney Benjamin Torrance argued in court that the government already has the authority to strip citizens of their constitutional rights. He cited the execution of Nazi saboteur Richard Quirin during World War II, saying the case was "completely within the Constitution." He then drew a connection between that case and the AUMF, which the Obama White House argues permits the government to detain and assassinate U.S. citizens they deem to be terrorists. Torrance told the court that judicial interpretation of the AUMF made it identical to the NDAA, which led the judge to ask him why it was necessary for the government to defend the NDAA if that was indeed the case. Torrance, who fumbled for answers before the judge's questioning, added that the United States does not differentiate under which law it holds military detainees. Judge Forrest, looking incredulous, said that if this was actually true the government could be found in contempt of court for violating orders prohibiting any detention under the NDAA.

Forrest quoted to the court Alexander Hamilton, who argued that judges must place "the power of the people" over legislative will.

"Nor does this conclusion by any means suppose a superiority of the judicial to the legislative power," Hamilton, writing under the pseudonym Publius, said in Federalist No. 78. "It only supposes that the power of the people is superior to both; and that where the will of the legislature, declared in its statutes, stands in opposition to that of the people, declared in the Constitution, the judges ought to be governed by the latter rather than the former. They ought to regulate their decisions by the fundamental laws, rather than by those which are not fundamental."

Contrast this crucial debate in a federal court with the empty campaign rhetoric and chatter that saturate the airwaves. The cant of our political theater, the ridiculous obsessions over vice presidential picks or celebrity gossip that dominate the news industry, effectively masks the march toward corporate totalitarianism. The corporate state has convinced the masses, in essence, to clamor for their own enslavement. There is, in reality, no daylight between Mitt Romney and Obama about the inner workings of the corporate state. They each support this section within the NDAA and the widespread extinguishing of civil liberties. They each will continue to funnel hundreds of billions of wasted dollars to defense contractors, intelligence agencies and the military. They each intend to let Wall Street loot the U.S. Treasury with impunity. Neither will lift a finger to help the long-term unemployed and underemployed, those losing their homes to foreclosures or bank repossessions, those filing for bankruptcy because of medical bills or college students burdened by crippling debt. Listen to the anguished cries of partisans on either side of the election divide and you would think this was a battle between the forces of light and the forces of darkness. You would think voting in the rigged political theater of the corporate state actually makes a difference. The charade of junk politics is there not to offer a choice but to divert the crowd while our corporate masters move relentlessly forward, unimpeded by either party, to turn all dissent into a crime.


http://truth-out.org...alizing-dissent

#110 Joker

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 01:41 PM

Protest Against Drones Held Outside of Raytheon

Protesters assembled outside the company's Largo campus were against the use of remote control drones in warfare.

http://largo.patch.c...ide-of-raytheon


Traffic zoomed passed between construction cones and protesters holding signs and megaphones Thursday afternoon along Bryan Dairy Road.

The group of more than 50 people held signs outside of Raytheon's Largo campus. "War is not a video game" and other messages on posters and banners discouraged the use of drones in warfare.

A pair of protesters used megaphones and called out across Raytheon's driveway. "Hey Obama, here's the plan, stop the drones in Pakistan."

Tom Buddemeier said they came to Raytheon because the company is one of several in Pinellas County that makes remote control drones.

Budemeier, of St. Petersburg, was against the use of taxpayer money for wars.

"I am against warfare. It's a tool of international bankers. They make us pay taxes on the (war) debt," Buddemeier said.

Wendell Wilson, of St. Petersburg, said he thought drones create problems for Americans.

"There should be a way to be more civilized than just bombing. It's not addressing the issues of what you are bombing ... you are only making more hardships," Wilson said.

The Largo protest was one of at least a couple events on drone warfare before next week's Republican National Convention in Tampa. Organizers also held a book discussion Wednesday in St. Petersburg on Medea Benjamin's "Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control," according to a news release.

Protest participants included CODEPINK, St. Pete for Peace, Food Not Bombs and Veterans for Peace, according to a news release.

#111 Joker

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 02:54 PM

Attacks from afar

Locals continue drone protests



Nine participants in a peaceful, anti-drone warfare protest at Beale Air Force Base were arrested on federal trespassing charges last Tuesday (Nov. 6). Although not among those charged, a contingent of local activists representing the Chico Peace & Justice Center was on hand and participated in the action.

“We had a discussion the night before about who could get arrested,” said Chico activist Chris Nelson, who has been attending monthly anti-drone “Occupy Beale” actions for the past two years. “Many of us were willing to be arrested and charged in Yuba County, but weren’t ready to get arrested for federal trespassing.”

As per this arrangement, Nelson and fellow activist Cathy Webster were among a group of protesters who blocked the main road into the base, effectively shutting it down for four hours.

“There’s a thin white line near the gate that, if you cross over, you’re on federal land and you’re getting arrested,” Nelson said. She explained that, while she and others held the road near Beale’s main gate, four people were arrested at another entrance. Five others crossed the line at the main gate to show their solidarity. All nine were taken inside the gatehouse and held for about 45 minutes before being released with a citation.

The women said a number of lawyers are working on defending the “Beale 9” pro bono, and fellow activists are anxiously awaiting their day in court.

“Putting this on trial is the most important thing for all of us,” Nelson said, adding that she intends to attend the legal proceedings. “I think we’re going to see a lot more arrests in the near future. More people are becoming aware of the drone situation, and more people are willing to put their lives on hold to help spread that awareness.”

In fact, days earlier, on Nov. 1, 17 anti-drone activists were arrested on the same charges at Hancock AFB outside of Syracuse, N.Y.

The U.S. government argues that use of drone warfare is a lawful component of military actions authorized by Congress shortly after the 9/11 attacks, citing them as the most effective tool in battling terrorists. Drones have carried out surveillance and attacks in the Middle East, Somalia, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen. To date, the United States has about 700 drones in its arsenal, compared to about 50 before Sept. 11. The CIA also has a cadre of several dozen drones, and was recently approved to order 10 more.

Critics say the use of drones is illegal and they are used to carry out targeted killings that are no different than assassinations, which are forbidden by international law. They also cite a high rate of civilian casualties and a lack of transparency in their use.

“They don’t have a very good track record of hitting their targets,” Webster said. “They have a better track record of hitting innocent civilians, contrary to what we might hear in the news. They say they’re being used to fight terror, but they’re actually spreading it.”

“When you see a child dismembered, or your mother killed, how else would you feel but angry and hateful,” Nelson said. “After they hit there’s pieces of people everywhere, and sometimes they’ll send in a second drone strike to hit anyone who tries to help, and those people are killed. This is in rural areas where no one is keeping track. It’s basically a war crime, and we’re perpetrating it on people we haven’t even declared war on.”

Webster said operating a drone can be an impersonal activity.

“Drone pilots sit in a room thousands of miles away and operate them much like you would a video game,” Webster said. “They’re operating on intelligence that there are terrorists in the area, but they really have no idea who they’re attacking.”

Hunter-killer drones are not piloted from Beale, but Northrop Grumman Global Hawk surveillance drones, responsible for gathering intelligence and targeting, are.

Two high-profile drone incidents have hit the news since President Obama’s Nov. 6 re-election. Drones struck alleged al-Qaeda militants, killing at least three people outside the Yemeni capital of Sanaa Nov. 7. On Nov. 9, Iranian officials announced they’d fired at and repelled an American aircraft from that country’s airspace Nov. 1. The United States confirmed the aircraft was an “unarmed” Predator drone, but claimed it was in international airspace.

As of Nov. 9, official numbers from the U.S. military indicate 333 drone strikes have been carried out in Afghanistan in 2012—far more than in any previous year. About 1,500 U.S. and U.K. air strikes have happened in Afghanistan since 2009, with more than 1,200 being American attacks.

“Obama is not backing off because he isn’t getting told by the people to do so,” Nelson said. “The American people need to understand how far away we’ve moved from conventional warfare, and that we’re putting all our eggs in one basket with this drone program.”




http://www.newsrevie...ent?oid=8353161

#112 BHB

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:04 PM

what is all this stuff?

what is your message here?

can you consolidate it and give me a 30 word or less concise summary?

#113 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:07 PM

what is all this stuff?

what is your message here?

can you consolidate it and give me a 30 word or less concise summary?


I'll give you one. Peace will never prevail, but many would like to see it happen.

#114 BHB

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:10 PM

that'd be nice.

but, I don't think most humans are evolved enough for that kind of worldwide peace.

what I really want to see is Deadshow Dan and Joker put on those huge sumo-wrestling outfits and go at it on the Vibes field next year.

#115 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:13 PM

That sounds peaceful.

#116 hoagie

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:30 PM

that'd be nice.

but, I don't think most humans are evolved enough for that kind of worldwide peace.

what I really want to see is Deadshow Dan and Joker put on those huge sumo-wrestling outfits and go at it on the Vibes field next year.


I cant even driue to work without wanting to kill someone, and you want world peace?

:wink:

#117 sarah b.

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 07:32 PM

omg. fb is so annoying. thank you for confining shit to one thread, here. I associate with a group of the formerly chasidic/formerly orthodox on fb, and I don't usually mind friending people, but today I want to go on a blocking spree. I'm totally not interested is shit I can't control over there. I have lots of shit I can't control here, and that's more than enough fun. If I took a drink every time I read a fucking post about the middle east, I'd be far too wasted to type.

#118 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 07:43 PM

omg. fb is so annoying. thank you for confining shit to one thread, here. I associate with a group of the formerly chasidic/formerly orthodox on fb, and I don't usually mind friending people, but today I want to go on a blocking spree. I'm totally not interested is shit I can't control over there. I have lots of shit I can't control here, and that's more than enough fun. If I took a drink every time I read a fucking post about the middle east, I'd be far too wasted to type.


(((Sarah B)))

I hear ya, darlin'.

#119 hoagie

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 08:25 PM

omg. fb is so annoying. thank you for confining shit to one thread, here. I associate with a group of the formerly chasidic/formerly orthodox on fb, and I don't usually mind friending people, but today I want to go on a blocking spree. I'm totally not interested is shit I can't control over there. I have lots of shit I can't control here, and that's more than enough fun. If I took a drink every time I read a fucking post about the middle east, I'd be far too wasted to type.


trying to control anything is an exercise in futility, you are not the captain, you are just strapped into the ride, lady! Enjoy it as much as you can.

#120 sarah b.

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:02 PM

Jack, you really belong at The Who tomorrow night.

#121 china cat

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:14 PM

Posted Image

#122 PeaceFrog

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:55 AM

It's not really a discussion when all I see is post after post of copy-pasta.

#123 insolent cur

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 11:22 AM

why is this still in the family forum, notwithstanding it's initially intended purpose?

#124 Joker

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 12:37 PM

I've tried to keep it on topic with only posts about peace protests. Hopefully that isn't too controversial for this forum. As you can see there have been a couple of hijack attempts which I've tried to quell as best as I could.

I guess all I'm saying is give peace a chance
Posted Image



Peace activists protest in front of White House, Congress


The onus is on Americans to turn up the pressure on Washington to bring about the changes that President Obama failed to deliver during his first term in office, says Medea Benjamin, cofounder of peace activist group CODEPINK.

“The last time Obama [was] elected, people really sat back and assumed that he would make the changes for us. And now we’ve got to be very aggressive about it,” Benjamin said in by phone on Wednesday.

She said that activists will gather in front of the White House and on Capitol Hill Wednesday to protest against U.S. wars and growing military spending.

“That’s why this morning we’re gathering in front of the White House with big symbolic pentagon that we’re going to deflate to show how so much money is being used to keep the wars going and 800 plus military bases we have overseas and keep producing weapons we don’t need.” “Then we are going to go to Congress today with the same message.”

“It’s important for people to be out there every day saying we need different priorities,” she added.

In her latest article, ‘Pushing Obama's Arc Towards Peace’ published on commondreams.org on Nov. 13, Benjamin argues that the “peace movement” which has been dormant over the past four years must now reactivate itself by joining forces with other sectors of the “progressive movement.”

“Over the next four years, this movement must grapple with key issues such as the Afghan war, killer drone attacks, maintaining peace with Iran, U.S. policy vis-a-vis Israel and Palestine, and the bloated Pentagon budget,” she writes.

She stresses that the peace movement must push for an immediate end to the U.S. occupation of Afghanistan.

“Despite President Obama’s talk about getting out of Afghanistan by the end of 2014, the U.S. military still has some 68,000 troops and almost 100,000 private contractors there, at a cost of $2 billion a week. And Obama is talking about a presence of U.S. troops, training missions, special forces operations, and bases for another decade. On the other hand, the overwhelming majority of Americans think this war is not worth fighting, a sentiment echoed in a recent New York Times editorial “Time to Pack Up.” It is, indeed, time to pack up.”

Benjamin also says that, “American drone attacks are out of control, killing thousands in Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia, many of them civilians.”

On the threats of military action against Iran over its nuclear energy program, she writes, “almost 60 percent of Americans oppose joining Israel in a war with Iran. We must make sure Obama and Congress hear that voice above the din of AIPAC lobbyists gunning for war, and steer clear of dragging the U.S. into yet another Middle Eastern conflict.”

“We also must renew efforts to oppose the crippling sanctions that are impacting everyday citizens in Iran, and rippling out to spike food prices elsewhere, including Afghanistan.”

http://www.presstv.i...ail/272229.html

#125 insolent cur

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:09 PM

yeah...but eventually it crosses the line.

admittedly, it's pretty hard to keep a thread neutral when discussing peace as anything other than truly abstract, conceptual, philosophy. once examples and specific beliefs enter the discussion, as one would expect them to do, myriad perspectives of how to attempt to achieve world peace naturally begin to steer the discourse into the realm of p&r.

fortunately, when that happens, we have a very active forum into which that thread can then be transferred.

#126 Joker

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:26 PM

I get it.

Peace isn't a subject that's acceptable to be discussed in this forum anymore.

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#127 china cat

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:28 PM

fuck peace, man. it's overrated.

drones, baby, drones

#128 Joker

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:29 PM

Tim was right you really are one evil bitch :funny1:

#129 insolent cur

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:30 PM

I get it.

Peace isn't a subject that's acceptable to be discussed in this forum anymore.

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obviously, that's not at all what i posted, and if i didn't know you well, i'd think you were serious. ;)

#130 Joker

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:32 PM

Fortunately (or is that unfortunately) you DO know me well :smile:

#131 insolent cur

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:39 PM

Fortunately (or is that unfortunately) you DO know me well :smile:


:grin: :heart: (totally creepy, of course)

now keep yourself in line for a few...i have to go to town and get some work done. ;)

#132 china cat

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:42 PM

Tim was right you really are one evil bitch :funny1:


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#133 sarah b.

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 02:03 PM

Did I tell my dental church story in the cassady thread? If not, it'll work here. I helped a patient have a sense of peace, the other weekend. That was cool.

#134 Joker

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 01:30 PM

SOA protest in 22nd year


The annual SOA protest is underway at Fort Benning.

For 22 years peace advocates have marched on Fort Benning to close the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC), formerly known as the School of the Americas. This year's protest comes on the heels of a meeting with the White House.

WHINSEC opened in 2001, but its predecessor SOA started in 1946 to train forces in Central and South America. Their motto is "Libertad, Paz y Fraternidad," meaning Freedom, Peace and Brotherhood.

Daniel Burgevin has been protesting for peace for 40 years and thinks the school stands for something different. "They've changed the name of the School of the Americas, but they haven't changed its purpose," he says, "and we haven't changed our purpose either. For as long as the school is here, we will be here."

WHINSEC's Lee Rials, however, says the school supports openness and cooperation with Latin American countries, and he invites anyone to come see the school for themselves. "People can come any weekday and sit in our classes, talk with our students and faculty, just see what we do," he says.

The Minnesota Veterans for Peace have been coming to the protest at Fort Benning for 20 years and feel like the US military should practice what it preaches. Member Dave Logsdon says, "I think that if we are fighting terrorism, we should stop teaching terrorism, and that's pretty much what we're doing here. We're teaching terrorism."

The SOA Watch group organizes the event each year to raise awareness about what they say are crimes against humanity in Latin America. The event draws thousands of supporters.

"It's a gathering of tribes," Logsdon says. "We meet so many beautiful and committed people, and people that are dedicated to peace."

Protesters says they will keep coming back until the school is closed. Burgevin says, "Peace, you know, is what this is really about, as it's always been about. People want peace all over the world from the Eskimos to the President, everybody wants peace, except a few people who profit from war."


http://www2.wrbl.com...ear-ar-4990911/

#135 elder

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 02:26 PM

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#136 Joker

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 04:50 PM

Anti-drone protesters knocked off course by broad restraining order

Demonstrators who have gathered at New York air base for years say their constitutional right to protest has been compromised after colonel granted strict order of protection

Ever since the F16 fighters were replaced by Reaper drones at Hancock Air National Guard base in upstate New York three years ago, peace activists have engaged in regular anti-drone protests outside the facility. In that time they have learned what to expect: holding banners at a site across the road is tolerated; close proximity or blocking gates risks arrest for trespass or disorderly conduct, a fine, or at the most, a few uncomfortable nights in a cell.

But now, in what appears to be a significant escalation by base authorities, the activists have been subjected to what they describe as an "absurd" restraining order which they say breaches their constitutional right to protest.

The order was issued by a judge [PDF] following the arrest of 17 protesters accused of blocking all three base entrances to traffic last month. It bans them specifically from approaching the home, school or workplace of Colonel Earl A Evans, a commander at the base. Failure to comply is a felony, punishable by up to seven years in jail.

Some of the activists are due to have the charges against them, including disorderly conduct and harassment, heard in Dewitt criminal court on Wednesday.

The arrested protesters, three of whom spoke to the Guardian, said they had never heard of Evans, had never met him and did not know what he looked like. He is the mission support group commander of the 174th fighter wing group, according to court documents.

Neither his home or school address is known to the defendants or detailed in the order, which names his place of work as 6001 East Molloy Road in Dewitt, New York – the military base. They are also banned from all forms of communication with Evans, including by email.

In a deposition to the court dated 25 October, Evans called for an order of protection and prosecution of the arrested protesters to the "fullest extent". He said the blocking of all three gates by the protesters was the "third time that protesters had done an unannounced protest" that resulted in a closure of the gate.

Written by hand, in block capitals, Evans wrote: "As an authorised representative of Hancock Field, I request that the court issue an order of protection on each and every defendant arrested such that they are to stay away from Hancock Field and I request prosecution to the fullest extent of the law."

The order has created confusion among the activists involved, as they say they no longer know where they can legitimately protest against the unmanned drones, which are operated from the base.

One of the 17 arrested, Elliott Adams, said: "This is a new tactic to deny us our first amendment rights to freedom of speech and freedom of assembly and to petition our government."

Adams, a Vietnam veteran, past president of Veterans for Peace and former mayor of Sharon Springs, accused the military and local law enforcement of increasingly heavy-handed tactics against peaceful protests. In the last 18 months, more than 100 people have been arrested at the base, according to protesters, but in at least a third of the cases, the charges have been dropped.

Last year, Adams was among 33 protesters arrested after marching in single file on the side of the road, in what he described as "frivolous charges" which were later dropped. But the latest order is the worst so far, he said.

More
http://www.guardian....alation-charges

#137 sarah b.

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 05:07 PM

That's weird. Back in the day, my mom couldn't get a restaining order against my former stepfather until he hit her.

#138 Joker

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 01:55 PM

Drones Kill Kids: Protesting in Hawaii Obama's Drone Program

http://www.opednews....130106-992.html

 

 

As President Barack Obama spent his last day, January 5, in Hawaii, representatives from Hawaii Peace and Justice and World Can't Wait protested his assassin drone program and lack of effort on Palestinian issues in front of his Hawaii vacation home.

 

Drone protests in the United States over the past three years have had an effect on reducing the number of drone strikes and the deaths of civilians. The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) reported on January 4, that probably due to public criticism, "civilian deaths fell sharply in Pakistan in 2012, with Bureau data suggesting that a minimum of 2.5% of those reported killed were civilians -- compared with more than 14% in 2011. This suggests the CIA is seeking to limit non-militant casualties, perhaps as a result of sustained criticism."

 

BIJ states that another reason for a decline in Pakistani strikes and civilian casualties may have been growing hostility. Some 74% of polled citizens said they view the US as an enemy, and that Pakistan was the only nation favoring Mitt Romney for US President.

 

Anti-American feelings in Yemen continue to grow with the increase in drone attacks in that country. Al Qaeda in the Arab Peninsula last week issued a bounty of three kilograms of goldfor the assassination of the US Ambassador to Yemen and a bounty of 5 million rials or $23,350 for the death of an American soldier.

 

US citizen protests against the American drone assassination program will continue in 2013 in the Arc of Justice march in Washington, DC on January 21, the day of President Obama's inauguration.

 

Protests in New York, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Missouri, Hawaii, Maryland, North Dakota and Wisconsin are planned for later in 2013.



#139 capt_morgan

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:15 PM

mamalukububuday says:

 

kill kill kill the white man



#140 Joker

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 03:16 PM

Anti-drone and Guantanamo protesters block CIA headquarters

 

 

Some one hundred protesters against United States drone strikes and "enhanced interrogations" have blocked the entrance to the CIA headquarters in Virginia.

 

The demonstrators stood blocking the Dolly Madison Boulevard entrance to the Central Intelligence Agency on Saturday 12 January 2013.

 

The action was part of a weekend of protests against drones, and to mark the eleventh anniversary of the opening of the Guantanamo Bay detention centre on an occupied part of the island of Cuba.

 

No attempt was made by police to remove the protesters, say observers. The entrance concerned was simply shut down.

Catholic peace movement Pax Christi was among the groups backing the protest.

 

Since the beginning of the year alone, there have been seven drone strikes into Pakistan, killing dozens of people, after a relative lull late in 2012.

 

Meanwhile, John Brennen, author of the drone "kill lists," has been nominated by President Barack Obama to become Director of Central Intelligence.

 

Critics say that drone attacks are not only illegal and inhumane, they are also acting as an unintended mirror and recruiting agent for the very acts of terrorism they are supposed to be eliminating.

 

Similar allegations are made against detention without trial, turture and special rendition, which have all been used in the 'war on terror'.

 

http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/17783



#141 Tabbooma

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 03:31 PM

Hmmm.... Wasnt this moved to politics forum?



#142 Joker

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 04:34 PM

There's been talk of moving it but I think as long as we keep it about the peace movement it'll be allowed to remain in this forum. I can't see there being a huge disagreement over people protesting for peace.

 

I've tried to keep discussions that start to get contentious out of it by starting threads over in P&R to discuss them and for the most part that's been successful. 

 



#143 Tabbooma

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 05:14 PM

Cool. Thanks ;)



#144 Joker

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 02:28 PM

More Boots on the Ground for Peace

 

Ten years ago on February 15, 2003, an estimated 15 million people across 800 cities protested the invasion of Iraq, making it the largest antiwar rally in history. There is no condition or situation where violence is justified as anything but a last resort. Both on the streets and in distant conflict zones, peace must always remain our first priority. Whether as a member of our Armed Forces in a distant land or as an educated citizen here at home, each of us has a vital role to play as we ensure our collective security. These protests were a tremendous statement by millions of concerned citizens, but we must all unite with one voice and share in these decisions as an informed and engaged public.

War has changed in many ways with the emergence of new conflicts and the advancement of technology. However, fundamentally war has not varied. Soldiers are still being deployed and innocent civilians become casualties. There have been more than 600,000 mortalities resulting from conflicts in this century alone. Among those are the 6,600 American men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice.

The long term effects of conflict continue to take their toll on our bravest as the suicide rate among the nation's active-duty military personnel continues to spike. The number of soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines taking their own lives has climbed to approximately one in every 18 hours and has eclipsed the rate of those dying in combat.

One of us, as a lawmaker in the U.S. House of Representatives, has been calling for a mandatory draft, in hopes to encourage Members of Congress to exhaust all diplomatic options before considering military engagements. A compulsory draft would serve as a guarantee that all Americans have a vested interest in the decision to use force, why we are using force, and who will be sent in harms' way. Today this legislation will be reintroduced, along with another bill that will require women to register for the Selective Service. The decision to allow women in combat was a tremendous milestone towards equality in America. Now that women are allowed in combat, the men and women who make up the one percent of Americans who serve in the armed forces have become equal partners in defending our nation the rest of America needs to get on board. 

One of us, as an influential leader in pop culture and prominent civic activist, has proactively promoted peace and encouraged Americans to stand up for their beliefs. The recognition brings prominence center stage in protests for equality and marches against violence. These have inspired a sense of shared responsibility and have encouraged many to find their own voice. Those who attend leave with a clear understanding that we cannot sit dormant and hope for change by chance. As long as there is violence all decisions on war and peace should be ours to make as equal partners. Whether it is to prevent gun deaths at home or the wars fought abroad our message must be clear and spoken in unison. Every American needs to stand up and be counted. 

Being a citizen of this great nation comes with great responsibility. The Universal National Service Act and All American Selective Service Act ensure that the cost of freedom and benefits of being an American are shared by all Americans. If we are all truly vested in the decision to use force -- the decision to use of force will truly be the last resort. 

We have a moral imperative to leave this country a better place for the generations to come. There is no promise that change will come easily or quickly. In the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy." We must remain unyielding along our path and resilient in our course. We can no longer stand idly by, the time for action is now.

 

 

 

Rep. Charles Rangel and Russell Simmons

 

 

http://www.huffingto..._b_2689992.html



#145 Joker

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 12:19 PM

Twin Cities protests growing U.S. intervention in Syria

 

Holding signs and banners, about 40 people gathered, June 19, on Lake Street Bridge which spans the Mississippi River to say no to the growing U.S. war on Syria. Passing cars honked in support of their message.

 

Marie Braun, told the gathering, "It is a very important time for the peace community to speak out against war and continued military involvement in the Middle East. And the American people are tired of war. A recent New York Times poll reported that 62% of respondents do not support U.S. participation in another military intervention. However, despite this opposition, the talk of safe zones, no-fly zones and supplying lethal weapons to rebel groups in Syria continues. War is the ultimate human rights violation and expanded U.S. military intervention in Syria will not lead to peace, justice or democracy for the Syrian people. It can only lead to a greater civilian death toll, more refugees and further destabilization in the region."

 

Meredith Aby said, "The Obama administration is also considering a ‘no fly zone’ which is discussed by politicians as an alternative to military intervention when in actuality it is warfare. Many of us worked together in solidarity with the people of Iraq. And in that war we say that the U.S./UN no fly zone in Iraq stripped the sovereignty of Iraq by prohibiting the government from flying even domestic aircraft in its own country. The U.S. Air Force conducted daily bombing campaigns which terrorized the civilian population. A no fly zone might sound better than military invasion, but it is in matter of fact the taking over of a country by controlling its airspace. It is critical that when you call the White House to say no weapons to Syria that you also say, ‘no to a no fly zone’ too."

 

 

http://www.fightback...ervention-syria



#146 PieDoh

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 01:39 PM

Ve too, vant piece...


of lucrative drone manufacturing market...

#147 Joker

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 03:13 PM

A quick Google search today turned up pretty much nothing recent or upcoming for U.S. peace protests or anti-war protests despite what's happening in Egypt and the fact we're moving troops into place around Syria.  :protest:

 

This is a tl;dr that sheds a little light on why that might be (below are the last couple of paragraphs)

 

 

Was That Really an Antiwar Movement? A Look at the Movement against the US War in Iraq

 

Meanwhile, the masses of people that were in the streets during the bulk of the US war in Iraq are no longer there, despite the ongoing drone war and the growing presence of US influence in the Syrian civil war. In part this is due to the economic concerns most of us have in the wake of the market crash; the subsequent bailouts and the growing trend towards austerity measures being enforced across the planet. However, some of the apparent apathy is related to the deceptively antiseptic appearance of drone warfare. The way drone attacks are presented to the US public makes it appear that there is very little damage, collateral or otherwise. As far as most people are concerned, only the “bad guys” are being killed. This perception of drone warfare alone separates the death and destruction of warfare even further from those in whose name it is being waged. Of course, as eyewitness reports from residents and eyewitnesses make clear, drone strikes are not clean and often intentionally target first responders and civilians.

 

When I asked World Can’t Wait’s Debra Sweet how to respond to this “new” warfare, she responded with a challenge. “There is no substitute for mass mobilization in the streets; it’s more important and mood-changing than anything else. But to get that takes getting to the youth, many of whom remember nothing at all pre-Bush; their world is one of permanent war with no borders.” Sweet’s last phrase is chilling on its own. The implications of it are even more so. For those who oppose any war involving US forces the task is clear. The means toward accomplishing the task, however, remain open for discussion.

 

http://dissidentvoic...us-war-in-iraq/



#148 Joker

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 02:47 PM

STOP U.S. war on SYRIA
Coast-to-coast protests

Aug. 27 — Without presenting even a hint of proof of Washington’s allegations that Syria has used poison gas, Secretary of State John Kerry has announced that a rocket attack on the sovereign state of Syria from four U.S. destroyers in the eastern Mediterranean is imminent.

Each destroyer deploys 90 cruise missiles, so even a time-limited attack would cause enormous damage.

 

This blatant and illegal threat, supported only by Washington’s co-criminals in London and Paris — the former colonial powers in the Middle East — drew an immediate angry reaction from anti-war organizations around the world and in the U.S. itself.

 

The International Action Center, the United National Antiwar Coalition and the Answer Coalition issued statements condemning U.S. war moves and calling for protest demonstrations to stop the missile attack, plus others to be held on the “day of” or “day after” the attack. The Antiwar Committee in Chicago, Arab Americans for Syria in LA, Syrian American Forum of New Jersey, Women Against Military Madness in Minneapolis, are moving.

 

Code Pink has called a protest during Obama’s MLK Aug. 28 speech, gathering at 10 a.m. at 12th & Constitution.  Protests have already been set for New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Dearborn, Mich. and some Florida cities.

 

 

More

http://www.workers.o...-u-s-war-syria/



#149 Joker

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 05:18 PM

Haunting reminder of millions of lives lost in war as artists stencil 9,000 bodies onto Normandy beach to mark Peace Day

  • British led project covered the famous coastline in poignant silhouettes
  • A team of 500 artists and volunteers contributed the moving installation
  • The 'fallen' were left to be washed away by the tide at the end of the day

 


Read more: http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz2fpbpkmQH

 

 

More pics at link

 

article-2429903-183153EA00000578-818_634