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#51 territoryranger

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 12:28 PM

Nice! Big price jump though...
 

While clover's a nice source of nectar/pollen if they can find it, there are an amazing number of sources throughout their foraging months. First and last major sources often start with dandelions and end with goldenrod and asters.

this is going back over 40 years now,my grandfather primarily had them for his apple and pear trees,but i remember he planted about and acre of clover to boot..we are in the suburbs.the further you go east on the island the more rural......any idea on their range? i guess i could google it.



#52 Tim the Beek

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 01:14 PM

Rule of thumb is 2 miles, although they've been known to go a lot further if they have to.



#53 Tim the Beek

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 01:16 PM

And don't get me wrong, it's a great idea to plant something for them to forage on nearby, but they don't have to have it. :)



#54 territoryranger

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 12:15 PM

Thanks for the info Tim.......I have always wanted to return to beekeeping,probably next year ...I still have quite a bit of my grandfathers honey stash left....i'm talking gallons..it has been properly stored,and is still very good.When my uncle decided to take over the hives,they were moved from my grandfathers roof,a very sunny area,to my uncle's back yard,a very shady area.and in a few years they all became infected with a disease and died....6-8 hives i believe...i don't know if the transition had anything to do with it, but my uncle was devastated,and tried everything to save them...i felt bad for him.......Concert Andy is smart for insisting on only locally produced honey,as it will build your immune system against any pollen-bourne allergies...................

Didn't mean to put a negative spin on this thread so,...........When I was in Kindergarten,we had "show and tell",..i'm looking around for something to bring to class.it was a cold morning and i see what i thought were dead bees outside one of the hives,so i scooped them up into a paper bag and brought them to show the class,and when i opened the bag,they were alive and wanted out of that bag....everyone including the teacher ran out,and left me to open the windows....i don't think i got an "A" that day..... :bee: :afro: :bee:



#55 Tim the Beek

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 04:43 AM

10255819_10152376374407450_1471707756033

 

:D

Hope things are going smoothly, J.



#56 MeOmYo

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 01:12 PM

:lol:

 

had a bit of a scare a couple days ago.  I've been feeding them equal parts water and sugar in a 1 gallon glass jar with small holes in the top.  I put 2 empty supers on and put the jar upside down over the bottom cover hole and put the top cover over that.  Well, I went to check on them a couple days ago and there was a real sticky ooze coming out of the bottom board with a few bees stuck to it and dead.  I thought, "shit, they're all stuck to this shit inside" :lol:.  All is fine I think, they've been out in force the last couple days.

 

I also spoke to a neighbor that has been doing bees for a while and he is going to come over and help me attempt to split them.  Basically, he said you want to take about 5 frames with brood and the bees that go with the frames will stay with the brood.  After a day or two they'll realize they are without a queen and if there is not a queen cell there, they'll make one.  Gonna give it a try with his help anyway in a couple weeks when there is more abundant food for them.



#57 Tim the Beek

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 01:33 PM

:lol:

 

had a bit of a scare a couple days ago.  I've been feeding them equal parts water and sugar in a 1 gallon glass jar with small holes in the top.  I put 2 empty supers on and put the jar upside down over the bottom cover hole and put the top cover over that.  Well, I went to check on them a couple days ago and there was a real sticky ooze coming out of the bottom board with a few bees stuck to it and dead.  I thought, "shit, they're all stuck to this shit inside" :lol:.  All is fine I think, they've been out in force the last couple days.

 

I also spoke to a neighbor that has been doing bees for a while and he is going to come over and help me attempt to split them.  Basically, he said you want to take about 5 frames with brood and the bees that go with the frames will stay with the brood.  After a day or two they'll realize they are without a queen and if there is not a queen cell there, they'll make one.  Gonna give it a try with his help anyway in a couple weeks when there is more abundant food for them.

They're prolly lickin' it up in there. :)

Sounds right on the split. Only thing I'd add is that you want to make sure some of the brood is very recent eggs. Which makes it important that you try to make sure you're not moving the queen as well, as there's a good chance she'll be near the most recently laid ones and laying more.



#58 u.s.blues

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 02:17 PM

x1zxh2.jpg



#59 MeOmYo

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 03:01 PM

They're prolly lickin' it up in there. :)

 

 

Yeah, the few that were dead and stuck to it gave me a fright though.  All I could think about was my damn queen is in there stuck to a blob of sugary blobness

 

 

When I was in Kindergarten,we had "show and tell",..i'm looking around for something to bring to class.it was a cold morning and i see what i thought were dead bees outside one of the hives,so i scooped them up into a paper bag and brought them to show the class,and when i opened the bag,they were alive and wanted out of that bag....everyone including the teacher ran out,and left me to open the windows....i don't think i got an "A" that day..... :bee: :afro: :bee:

 

That is awesome!



#60 Tim the Beek

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 03:17 PM

All I could think about was my damn queen is in there stuck to a blob of sugary blobness

 

[irony]That would not be sweet.[/irony]



#61 nikkiblue

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 04:34 PM

I love this thread.  I'm scared of bees because I have never been stung, and I know an allergic reaction could kill ya...   

 

MeOmYo, if your not raising the bees for honey, are you just doing it for the environment?  hobby?  



#62 MeOmYo

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 04:42 PM

I love this thread.  I'm scared of bees because I have never been stung, and I know an allergic reaction could kill ya...   

 

MeOmYo, if your not raising the bees for honey, are you just doing it for the environment?  hobby?  

 

I'd say a little of both but the immediate benefit to me is for my gardens.  I have a couple vegetable and a couple perennial gardens.  Don't get me wrong, if they make extra honey, I'm gonna take it but I'm not looking to make a business out of it.  Also, I just think they're cool.  There's something relaxing about watching them do their thing.  They're the epitome of hard workers.



#63 MeOmYo

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 04:45 PM

Also, I was stung last year for the first time in 30 years.  Before I got them, bees scared the shit out of me too but working with them in the limited amount I have and understanding them a little more, most of that fear is gone.  They're not looking for a fight, they just want to work.  Refer to post #55.



#64 melissaphish

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 04:49 PM

How shocking that wisdom is tilting towards pesticides being the main cause?

 

http://blogs.discove...e/#.U20G7IFdXeA

 

Really You mean when you put poison in a creature's food supply, that might kill them? Who'da thunk?



#65 Tim the Beek

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 05:01 PM

They're not looking for a fight, they just want to work.

 

True.

Had a worker get inside my veil once. She wanted out as much as I wanted her to be. :)

As long as they aren't Africanized, which will never likely be an issue in the Northeast, or a genetic outlier, they're amazingly docile as long as you're careful around them.

You mentioned an allergy earlier in the thread, I think. Did you have any reaction to the sting?



#66 MeOmYo

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:20 PM

You mentioned an allergy earlier in the thread, I think. Did you have any reaction to the sting?

 

No.  30 years ago when I was stung, I was stung in the finger and it swelled up more than triple the size.  This time I was stung in the finger and it did nothing.  T was freaking the F out and I was kinda giggling, treating it as more of a science experiment than an emergency :lol:

 

I was stung because I was taking my coat/veil and gloves off when I noticed a bee on my finger, rather than remaining calm and talk to it, name it and make up stories of how beautiful, kind and hard working it was, I freaked out and tried to brush it off me in an almost epileptic kind of way.  Didn't work out.  It was the second time working with them and I was still pretty nervous about the whole venture.



#67 MeOmYo

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 01:55 PM

hey TtB, did you use an extractor to take the honey or set them up to let gravity do it's work?



#68 Tim the Beek

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:10 PM

For just a few hives, the word from those wiser than I am was that "Crush and Strain" was the way to go...scraping the comb off of the frames into a large bowl, mashing it all up well and then hanging it in a warm place overnight in a nylon bag (beekeeping supply places sell them, but you can prolly rig something up, prolly) to let the honey drain out. And that's what I always did. Don't be surprised if the girls come buzzing around your windows while you're doing it.

The (marginal, IMO) downside to this is that they have to rebuild the comb on the frames before they can refill them, whereas if you're decapping and using an extractor, there's less work for them to do to reuse the frames.

You can buy cheap extractors, but you get what you pay for. Plastic gears which wear out quickly, etc.

If you're thinking about harvesting, it sounds like they're having a good year!

 



#69 MeOmYo

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:29 PM

I have one super where only the outsides of the outside frames are not completely capped (checked last Saturday) and the super above is about half full.  By now I would expect the lower super to be fully capped.

 

The split seems to be going well, in fact, that hive seems to be doing much better than the new nuc hive based on bee traffic.  I sort of messed up because I put the split in a hive with no comb on the frames and the nuc in a hive that had comb on all the frames.  I had intended on splitting them up between the hives but waited too long and the nuc bees are full bore into cleaning all the used frames.  It may not mess them up if I switch some frames but I'm just going to leave it the way it is and see how it goes.  I'm pretty sure the split hive has enough time to fill the hive bodies for winter.

 

So far the wintered over hive is kicking ass, hive bodies are full and 1-1/2 supers full.  I haven't checked the lower hive bodies in the other 2 hives but I just put them in about 2 weeks ago.

 

Yeah, I really don't want to take all the comb.  That is a huge jumpstart for them.  The supers I have on there I bought used and had comb.  I have 3 other supers with no comb I intend to use when the goldenrod comes for them to build comb in.

 

I have a friend that has a 2 frame manual extractor that I can use but they have nothing good to say about it.  Makes a mess, very hard to keep balanced, etc.  I thought of trying to make one here at work from an old beer keg if it would be worth the effort.



#70 Tim the Beek

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:35 PM

Looks like there are a bunch of youtube videos for making homemade extractors if you want some ideas. :)



#71 Tim the Beek

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:37 PM

Are you doing mite counts at all? If so, what are they looking like?

Can't wait to have some space to do all of this again! :)



#72 MeOmYo

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:44 PM

the hive I put the split in has a screened bottom so I can do mite counts, the other 2 have regular bottom boards.  So, no, I have not be doing mite counts.

 

When I did the split, I had someone help me (or rather I helped them) and while going through the hive we found no mites at all.  I did not treat them this spring but plan to in the fall with Apiguard.



#73 concert andy

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 08:18 PM

A coworker brought in a few pounds of honey in jars.  Mostly Blueberry and wild flowers.

 

I purchased a jar from him today.

 

Only note, the honey is very light in color.



#74 MeOmYo

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 08:23 PM

Cool.  Haven't extracted any yet though I have 2 supers full and another well on it's way to being full.  I got everything I need except time.  :lol:



#75 concert andy

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 08:30 PM

Cool.  Haven't extracted any yet though I have 2 supers full and another well on it's way to being full.  I got everything I need except time.   :lol:

 

I asked him a few questions that I learned from here.  Like what did he use to get the honey.  Extractors.

 

He did mentioned he has three hives.  The one from last year still hasnt produced any honey.  He mentioned having to replace the queen in that hive.

 

 

Thanks to all of you for helping me sound intelligent when speaking about this subject.



#76 Tim the Beek

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:10 PM

:clap:



#77 JBetty

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 01:58 PM

 

 

 

 

Thanks to all of you for helping me sound intelligent when speaking about this subject.

 

 

 

 

Ballers.  They are here for you.   :mrgreen:



#78 MeOmYo

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 02:01 AM

Extracted 2 supers on Saturday and got 60 lbs.  First super I just ran through a metal screen type strainer with a layer of cheesecloth to filter it.  Second was through screen and 5 layers of cheesecloth.  Second was much much clearer but took forever.  I had to heat up both slightly on the stove to even get it to go through them.  I processed the supers separate and there is a distinct color difference with the earlier honey being lighter in color.  

Extracting went quite well.  To decap, used a clear plastic smaller rubber-maid bin with a board across the top and a screw just poking through from the bottom.  The screw is to hold the frame in place.  Place a frame on the screw and I used a bread knife to cut the caps off.  I am borrowing a 4 frame extractor that is a pretty old contraption.  There are tabs on the top and on opposite sides so I put S hooks in them and set it up on the top step of the deck.  I ratchet strapped from the S hooks around the posts and below the bottom tailing board to hold the extractor down.  I just let the honey flow into a pot on the next step down.  I them brought the pots inside to heat a bit to filter.

From suiting up to get the supers off the hive to clean up was about 10 hours.  I need to improve the filtering/bottling process.  I'm thinking a large filter setup that would sit on top of a 5 gallon bucket and then putting a smaller gate valve in the bottom of the bucket.  This way I can dump the honey on the filter and as it's making it's way through, I can bottle right out of that bucket.



#79 Tim the Beek

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 02:08 AM

Nice!

Lighter honey from earlier in the season is typical.

Side note: In a completely unoriginal move, I ordered me a "Nothing Runs Like A Bear" T-shirt the day after we got back from Vibes. :)



#80 MeOmYo

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 02:48 AM

:lol:

#81 holysmokes

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 04:41 PM

What is all the buzz about anyway. Just kidding, I love this thread. It is taught me for Bee's sake, stop using the glycophosphate!

#82 MeOmYo

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 06:17 PM

bees are still busy busy.  looks like I should get about 150 lbs of honey off one hive.  WTF ams I gonna do with alla that?



#83 Sensei Miller

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 06:22 PM

Meade!!

#84 MeOmYo

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 06:24 PM

thought of that.  I still have 15 gallons of hard cider in carboys that I need to bottle from last fall.  at 10-12 lbs of honey for 5 gallons, that's a lot of meade. :lol:



#85 PieDoh

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 06:28 PM

Since honey never goes bad...save it for food in case of the zombie apocalypse?



#86 Sensei Miller

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 06:42 PM

Get a distiller's license and turn that mead to honey likker.

It's so good...just isn't common because of the price of honey.

Awesome work by the way.

#87 Ginger Snap

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 07:15 PM

bees are still busy busy.  looks like I should get about 150 lbs of honey off one hive.  WTF ams I gonna do with alla that?

 

Christmas gifts. :lol:



#88 Tim the Beek

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 07:25 PM

 

bees are still busy busy.  looks like I should get about 150 lbs of honey off one hive.  WTF ams I gonna do with alla that?

 

Christmas gifts. :lol:

 


Ser. I've done this in the past. Most people love it.



#89 MeOmYo

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 07:27 PM

Since honey never goes bad...save it for food in case of the zombie apocalypse?

 

I had something else in mind to give the zombies :funny1:

 

 

Get a distiller's license and turn that mead to honey likker.

It's so good...just isn't common because of the price of honey.

Awesome work by the way.

 

honestly, I really didn't do a thing aside from ensuring they have a never ending supply of work to do :lol:

 

 

 

bees are still busy busy.  looks like I should get about 150 lbs of honey off one hive.  WTF ams I gonna do with alla that?

 

Christmas gifts. :lol:

 

 

definitely



#90 Wende

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 03:50 AM

ton's of delicious honey this year.

#91 territoryranger

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 04:47 AM

honey_badger_vs_zombies_postcard-ra1f891 :lol:



#92 concert andy

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Posted 02 October 2014 - 08:38 PM

The Honey Lobby Is Demanding That the Government Define Honey

http://www.theatlant...s-honey/380994/

 

What is honey?
 
The answer may seem obvious: It's the gooey substance that often sweetens a mug of hot tea. It's what Jews dip apple slices into to celebrate the new year. It's a remedy for coughs, an ingredient in some chapsticks, and a path to shinier hair (some believe).
 
But it turns out that what counts as honey—and what doesn't—is a bit of a sticky mess. Does honey have to contain some pollen? Is it still honey if it's cut with corn syrup? How many microns get through the filters used to process it?
 
The honey lobby—yes, there's a honey lobby, and it represents the nation's non-ultrafiltered honey producers—has long fought for a definition it likes. In 2011, the FDA denied a petition for a standard of identity for honey. Now, the lobby has turned to the USDA for help. The main thing they say they want is some clarity: The FDA allows anything that's “a thick, sweet, syrupy substance that bees make as food from the nectar of flowers and store in honeycombs” to be labeled honey.
 
Smuckers, for example, lists the sole ingredient of its honey product as "Grade A Honey," but what exactly does that mean? The USDA currently has a voluntary grading system based on moisture content, defects, flavor, and clarity—but this system is not enforced nor does it get to the heart of the issue: pollen content.
 
The honey lobby, to put it mildly, does not approve of honey sans pollen. They've called that syrup—the product so common on most grocery-store shelves—"food fraud," believing that true honey is a product of a particular place, unique to the flowers surrounding a given hive. But those who produce that common "filtered honey" say that it's what consumers want.
 
To make matters more complicated, China currently leads the way in global honey exports, and Chinese honey has been accused of being cut with fructose syrup. This, too, is part of what the honey lobby wants to get at—that a sweetener that's the result of feeding corn syrup to bees (or adding sugar or syrup to honey directly) shouldn't be considered real honey.
 
To sort out this situation, the USDA has issued a call for comments to describe "how a Federal standard of identity for honey would be in the interest of consumers, the honey industry, and U.S. agriculture." Those comments are publicly available on Regulations.gov, and so far 70 comments have been received from honey makers around the country.
 
The vast majority—more than 95 percent—of the comments filed support the need for the USDA to set a standard, but there's also concern that the regulations will be too strict, making honey production difficult for small beekeepers. T. Pollard writes: "This additional regulatory efforts [sic] would only benefit the big honey operations, as those proprietors are the ones pushing for additional regulations by adding undue expense on the smaller honey operations."
 
As if all that weren't trouble enough for the nation's honey producers, there's also been the pesky trouble of "honey laundering," which refers to imported honey arriving with fake paperwork or smuggled in avoiding duties. As one response to the USDA's call bemoaned: "Many of us beekeepers, are outraged at the dumping of foreign honey. And honey that is cut with corn syrup." Last year, U.S. Customs had one of the biggest honey busts ever. “Project Honeygate” caught two U.S. honey plants attempting to skirt $180 million in anti-dumping duties. Charles Schumer called it a "buzzkill" for honey smugglers and called for a zero-tolerance policy for honey laundering.