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First Meditation


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#1 Jabadoodle

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 03:38 PM

Well, tried meditating on my own today. Have never really done it before except maybe a few times in college in a philosophy class I took.

Sat in the sun room and set a chime for 5 minutes. Found that not many thoughts arose. I had just been on the computer typing furiously and suspected all that would rattle around, but it didn't. Had a few thoughts but just let them go. 

Being that I have no routine yet, I adjusted my body a bit and fiddled with whether to have my eyes open or closed. Open felt like maybe too much distraction. Yet I liked open. Closed was quiet (in a good way) but open felt like I was more connected to all of everything. I could see (mostly) without naming or "thinking" about things. I just experienced the things. More, the space between and around things seemed to very much stand out. 

With eyes closed I did what I heard one should do, I put attention to my breath. 

A couple of times, may thee, I wondered how much time had passed. When the chime rang I was surprised, I figured it had not been that long. 

 



#2 sums

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 04:23 PM

there are different schools on eyes open or closed. tibetan buddhist meditation and zen, i know, are eyes open. there are so many kinds of meditation. whatever works for you is perfect :)



#3 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 04:37 PM

If you like having your eyes both open and closed, you may enjoy an exercise my meditation teacher taught me:

 

Start with your mindfulness practice - for the 5 minutes you mentioned, for instance. Then, without changing position or opening your eyes, bring your awareness to how you feel in your body - your breath, your weight, your posture, etc... Hold this expanded awareness for a few minutes. The expand that awareness out to include all of the sounds around you. Don't let go aware of your awareness of how you feel in your body, tho, just add your awareness of all auditory sensations to the mix. Hold this for a few minutes again. Then open your eyes and bring your awareness of all that is within your visual range (without looking around, keep your eyes still) into your awareness of your body, and the sound, and hold again. Expand your awareness to become aware of your awareness (sounds kinda weird, I know) and then hold that for a few minutes more - the goal is for there to be vessels within vessels of awareness. When you are satisfied with your expansion and inclusion of all these layers, complete the meditation with an exhale.

 

It's a really nice exercise to take things in in layers like that and become attuned to each in order. Makes you take notice of how much we filter out of our awareness daily.

Enjoy your practice! :)



#4 Jabadoodle

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 06:43 PM

:smile2:



#5 hoagie

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 07:13 PM

Sittong on my bed in the dark and focusing on a candle flame on the dresser always works for me, i find it simple to get lost in that flame and let go of everything else. Intense

#6 Jabadoodle

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 08:24 PM

Sittong on my bed in the dark and focusing on a candle flame on the dresser always works for me, i find it simple to get lost in that flame and let go of everything else. Intense


Def want to try that.



#7 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 03:34 PM

I found the notes from the meditation teacher I worked with... I couldn't recall the name for increased awareness meditation exercise I mentioned above, but it is called the Primary Practice. I have included the notes he gave me here in case anyone else is interested:
 

 

Primary Practice

There is no particular order in which to become aware of different fields. Choose one.
For example, the visual field. See everything in your field of vision as deeply as you can.
There’s no need to strain, just open to what is there, as much as you can. You may want
to start with a focus and expand to the whole field, but this is not necessary. Expand to
include the auditory field … all sounds. And then expand and open to the kinesthetic
field, all those bodily sensations, temperature, pressure, etc. Expand and include the
emotional tone … sometimes this is really obvious, sometimes more subtle, but include
whatever feelings are there as they move and change. Finally, expand to include all of
the thoughts, how they rise and disappear. Open to all the fields at once. If you lose your
way you can always start again and begin with the visual field and then expand from one
field to the next, including more and more. When it feels like you’ve opened as much
as you can, open further. Then include the awareness of the awareness itself … look at
what experiences all of this rich information, investigate the origin of awareness. And
when you are as open as you can be to all the sensory and emotion/though information
and also including awareness of the awareness … just stop making any effort and ride
the experience of presence. When the awareness begins to degrade (i.e. you lose your
awareness of the various fields and their full richness; and/or lose the experience of being
aware of the awareness) you can start the process again.


#8 Jabadoodle

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:05 PM


Thanks Lola :smile2:



#9 Lazy Lightning

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:34 PM

It's funny b/c in the notes it starts with visual, then auditory, then physical, then emotional... but in class we did it the opposite way - maybe because it was piggybacked on to the 20 minutes of samatha meditation we'd be in beforehand.

Anyways, I always found it to be a really neat exercise. :)