Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Thread to post info about where our food comes from


  • Please log in to reply
90 replies to this topic

#51 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,834 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 04 June 2013 - 02:31 PM

that's the only one I know of in the area. I think the next closest one would be out of state...



#52 MeOmYo

MeOmYo
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,537 posts

Posted 04 June 2013 - 02:34 PM

Aldi bought Trader Joe's in 1979



#53 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,834 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 04 June 2013 - 02:52 PM

http://www.upi.com/B...50261370308509/

 

Ben & Jerry's are going GMO free...



#54 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 04 June 2013 - 03:10 PM

Aldi bought Trader Joe's in 1979

:lol:  Well then. 

 

I never knew either one of them existed until recently.

 

OK, so let me rephrase that "Aldi's owns Trader Joes"  Better?

 

I want to check out Trader Joes.  I've never been.



#55 MeOmYo

MeOmYo
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,537 posts

Posted 04 June 2013 - 04:19 PM

:lol:

 

I like me some Trader Joe's.  I don't get up that way much though.  I do go to Aldi's often though for select things.  Like anywhere, some of their products are not good.



#56 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 04 June 2013 - 05:08 PM

Don't buy the tuna.  It looks and smells like dog food.  :(

I find that when food shopping.  You actually have to go to like 4 different stores to get it done right.  Every store has their thing.  ya know?  Between the farmers market's, organic foods.....milk....eggs....etc.  All different places.

Having a 2 year old sure does make it so hard though.  :lol:



#57 china cat

china cat
  • VibeTribe
  • 15,036 posts

Posted 16 June 2013 - 01:55 PM

Do you drink Celestial Seasonings Tea?

Please be advised that the "natural flavorings" in Celsetial Seasonings Tea contains "free glutamic acid", the bad part of MSG. This was confirmed by the manufacturer. All products with "natural flavoring" are suspect as most manufacturers refuse to disclose what their natural flavorings are and categorize them as proprietary information. If it goes in our bodies, we
have a right to know what is in it. A complete list of "hidden sources of MSG" is available at http://
www.truthinlabeling.org/

#58 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 16 June 2013 - 05:26 PM

I know this isn't food but ya know those tooth flosser pick thingy's?  They're all made in china and most of our toothbrushes are all made in china too.  For some reason, after reading about China and their sanitation practices....yea, I want nothing they make in my mouth and possible bloodstream on a daily basis.



#59 china cat

china cat
  • VibeTribe
  • 15,036 posts

Posted 15 July 2013 - 02:38 AM

36565_415803165195027_1217110970_n.jpg



#60 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,834 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 15 July 2013 - 11:35 AM

Boo. This sucks. I hate people.

#61 TEO

TEO

    VibeGuide

  • VibeGuide
  • 23,248 posts

Posted 15 July 2013 - 04:45 PM

Prolly should research the company that makes your juicer of choice as well.



#62 Tim the Beek

Tim the Beek
  • VibeTribe
  • 16,351 posts

Posted 16 July 2013 - 12:22 PM

Yum.

http://www.foodreneg...n-organic-food/

 

 

Michael Pollan once gave readers this advice, “Avoid food products that contain ingredients that a third-grader cannot pronounce.” Love him or hate him, Michal Pollan’s food rule #7 is spot on. And it seems simple enough, right? No disodium guanylate, pyrophosphate, sodium stearoyl lactylate, or crazy glow-in-the-dark food additives. Just real food.

Unfortunately, when it comes to bacteria-eating viruses sprayed on your lunch, labels don’t help – and “organic” is no exception. Clever labeling laws have made detecting the presence of this “food additive” – sold under the brand name Listex – virtually impossible.

Why exactly would anyone want to spray meat, cheese, fruit vegetables and other foods with viruses? It’s simple, really. Listex is a cocktail of 6 bacteria-eating viruses (bacteriophages) that have been “trained” in a lab to target and kill Listeria monocytogene, a bacteria which sickens about 1,600 people a year. Rather than work on raising healthier animals and improving handling processes, this “band aid” approach to dealing with pathogens has been creatively classified as a “clean label processing aid.” In other words, it’s been going on for years but no knows because companies aren’t required to tell you.

Clever, huh? As consumers get more savvy about reading labels, manufacturers become more coy about how they print them. They “scrub” labels of undesirable ingredients by coming up with new names for them or leaving them off altogether, often with the approval of regulatory agencies such as the FDA. Listex is a perfect example. “Consumers won’t be aware that meat and poultry products [and now cheese, fruits, vegetables and other products, including organic] have been treated with the spray,” FDA representative Andrew Zajac told the press when Listex was approved.

Now, I’m not phobic about viruses (to say the least), but I find it disturbing that such a radical approach to food safety was FDA-approved without even one human safety study. Instead it was given “GRAS” (generally recognized as safe) status because a few previous human studies on other products indicated safety, though one was as old as 1967. ¹ Hmmm . . . weren’t GMO’s approved as “GRAS”? Forgive me if I’m a little skeptical.

Trained Assassins

So basically – according to the manufacturer – the way this is supposed to work is these 6 “trained” viruses are sprayed on various foods as a safety precaution. If Listeria is present, it will mistake the viruses for food and eat them. The viruses will then begin a massive replication process that will eventually cause the bacteria to burst wide open, spilling the viruses onto the food. Yummy!

Now, normally the listeria would try to fight off the attack by producing endotoxins (substances which have been shown to provoke allergies, asthma, autoimmune problems, elevate cholesterol, cause inflammation in the digestive tract, and have been noted as a catalyst for colon cancer), but that is not the case here. Intralytix, Listex’s maker, has altered or “purified” the viruses in such a way that endotoxin levels were undetectable in the samples presented to the FDA. While that’s a good thing, we know that viruses are highly adaptable and slight changes can occur from batch to batch, so it is unclear whether this level of “purity” has continued over the years.

Another concern reported by ABC News is that “The bacteriophages might also get into battle with the friendly bacteria in the digestive system, making it harder for the body to digest food.” This a problem because not only would such a “battle” severely damage our immune systems first line of defense (the gut), it leads us right back to the concern above. How do we know that the good bacteria in our bodies won’t produce allergy/asthma/auto-immune disease/ high-cholesterol promoting endotoxins to protect themselves from Listex. We don’t.

What else don’t we know? I’d say the biggie is how another biotech darling, GMO’s, interacts with mass quantities of bacteriophages. Genetically-modified foods contain viral promoter genes that help the foreign DNA infect the host DNA, and scientists have long expressed concerns that the viral fragments in promoter genes could recombine to create more aggressive viruses. What happens when we dump tons of live viruses on GMO-laden foods is anybody’s guess, but rather than continue on down this path and find out I have a suggestion:

Let’s Wash Our Hands!

And eat sustainably raised meats, because unlike their industrially-raised counterparts they are very unlikely to contain harmful amounts of listeria, e. coli, or campylobacter bacteria.³ Let’s buy our milk and cheese from farmers who graze their cows out in open air and sunshine, and our produce from those who don’t fertilize with CAFO manure. Better yet, let’s send our little ones to do it for us.

Franklin-Farmers-Market.jpg

The thing about letting my four-year old, Katie, carry a fist full of dollars through the farmers market, weigh the zucchini from the back of a rusty blue pickup, debate the merits of sausage over bacon, and inevitably hand our rancher way too much money, is this:

He SEES her. The way she smells the melons like they’re dew from heaven. The way she lights up when he says he has peaches this week. It’s not complicated. It’s about us seeing their faces, and them seeing the faces of the precious little lives that are worth more than profit margins and cutting corners.

Teaching our kids to ask for “ham and cheese with a side of virus, please” – now that’s complicated.

Listeria affects about 1,600 U.S. citizens a year, most of whom are immuno-compromised adults, pregnant women and infants. By all means let’s protect these populations with good sanitation and by educating them on how to avoid foods likely to contain listeria. But let’s not leave the “solutions” to the guys that gave us wood pulp in our cheese, secret ingredients in our orange juice, glue in our meat and ammonia-laden pink slime. Agreed?



#63 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 16 July 2013 - 01:24 PM

Prolly should research the company that makes your juicer of choice as well.

Made in CHINA!   :lol:

 

No thanks.



#64 TEO

TEO

    VibeGuide

  • VibeGuide
  • 23,248 posts

Posted 17 July 2013 - 02:39 PM

943629_563987660313422_2147431073_n.jpg



#65 TEO

TEO

    VibeGuide

  • VibeGuide
  • 23,248 posts

Posted 17 July 2013 - 02:56 PM

945716_654313097931873_2033240835_n.jpg



#66 TEO

TEO

    VibeGuide

  • VibeGuide
  • 23,248 posts

Posted 18 July 2013 - 12:18 AM

The Shocking Ingredients In Beer

 

Slide1.jpg

 

 

I have to confess, I’m not a beer drinker, but there’s someone in my household that loves it, so I had to figure out the truth. Is beer really healthy? Why are the ingredients not listed on the label? Which brands can we trust? Which brands are trying to slowly poison us with cheap and harmful ingredients? All of these questions were going through my head at once at lightening speed. So a year ago, I started to research what was really in beer and after questioning several beer companies, reading books about food science, and talking to experts, the information I discovered was downright shocking.

I see it all the time. Someone who eats organic, makes the right choices at the grocery store, is fit and lives an extraordinary healthy lifestyle but then drinks beer like it is going out of style.

Caring about what you eat doesn’t necessarily translate into caring about what you drink and this is a HUGE MISTAKE.

 

More here:  http://foodbabe.com/...dients-in-beer/



#67 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,834 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 18 July 2013 - 01:16 AM

I see it all the time. Someone who eats organic, makes the right choices at the grocery store, is fit and lives an extraordinary healthy lifestyle but then drinks beer like it is going out of style.

 

 

Guilty of this. I don't drink beer often though. I make it a point to support local breweries, but it's tough just finding a good beer, much less one that is not loaded with bullshit. I was happy when I found out a new-found fave (Brooklyn brewery) is GMO free though. 

 

It's always been tough for me. I don't want to get so caught up in it that I worry myself to pieces and make a negative time for myself, but I also obviously want to eat good things, and avoid stupid shit. Though I won't remain ignorant, there's definitely some truth to the 'ignorance is bliss' statement. In the end though, I buy what I prefer the most, local and organic, and I will continue to do so as long as I can afford it. 



#68 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 18 July 2013 - 03:34 AM

It's all a balancing act.  If you put too much thought and effort into "being" one way or another.....you're going to faulter some where. 

Balance.  Balance  Balance.



#69 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,834 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 31 July 2013 - 03:49 PM

http://www.traderjoe...sponses.asp?i=4

 

Trader Joe's Products are Sourced from Non-GMO Ingredients



December 12, 2012 (updated)

Our approach to Genetically Modified Organisms is simple: we do not allow GMO ingredients in our private label products (anything with Trader Joe's, Trader Jose's, Trader Ming's, etc. on the label).

Our efforts began in 2001, when we determined that, given a choice, our customers would prefer to eat foods and beverages made without the use of genetically engineered ingredients.

When developing products containing ingredients likely to come from genetically modified sources, we have the supplier of the product perform the necessary research to provide documentation that the suspect ingredients are from non-GMO sources. This documentation is in the form of affidavits, identity-preserved certification of seed stock, and third-party lab results from testing of the ingredients in question.

In addition to this work done in developing a given item, we conduct random audits of items with potentially suspect ingredients, using an outside, third-party lab to perform the testing.

Given our position on GMO ingredients in Trader Joe's label products and the work done in support of that position, it is our expectation that our products test as non-GMO.

We have yet to take the approach of labeling products as non-GMO because there are no clear guidelines from the US governmental agencies covering food and beverage labeling. Instead of waiting for such guidelines to be put into effect and based upon customer feedback, we took a more holistic approach and made the no GMO ingredients position part of what the Trader Joe's label encompasses.

We're unable to make the same claims for branded products (products not in the Trader Joe’s label).

Organic products, regardless of brand, are by definition non-GMO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I knew there was a reason I <3 Trader Joe's....
 



#70 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,834 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 04 August 2013 - 01:22 AM

http://eatlocalgrown...ch-dollars.html

 

This is fucking disgusting.

 

scratch that, not just disgusting, but seriously immoral and (should be) illegal. 



#71 mayfly

mayfly
  • VibeTribe
  • 1,004 posts

Posted 22 August 2013 - 05:48 PM

I see it all the time. Someone who eats organic, makes the right choices at the grocery store, is fit and lives an extraordinary healthy lifestyle but then drinks beer like it is going out of style.

Caring about what you eat doesn’t necessarily translate into caring about what you drink and this is a HUGE MISTAKE.

 

More here:  http://foodbabe.com/...dients-in-beer/

 

Guilty as charged - however, I usually drink my own homebrew and definitely mostly Craft Brews which both could also have GMO's in but less processing / preservatives etc.

 

Wild Turkey is my Bourbon of choice and it is the only KY Bourbon to use non GMO grains in the distillation of their whiskey  :bigsmile:

 

 

for the record - same could be said about salad, unless you grew it yourself or know the grower - it too could be contaminated with Miracle Gro or the like...



#72 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 01:49 PM

It's funny......And take this with a grain of salt...I'd rather feed my children something out of a box as opposed to regular produce...I believe it is more harmful to eat the food that have these disgusting chemicals soaked into their skins and meat.

Doesn't mean I feed them processed, it just means I don't ever feed them non organic.  Not anymore at least.

 

I'm digging my garden a lot this year.  Next year, we'll be eating from it all summer long. 

 

And I don't drink beer but maybe a half dozen times a year and I despise liquor.

 

I agree "Hey, I eat all natural but I smoke and drink lot's of booze"  :lol:

 

but then again....it's all about balance.  Finding that balance.



#73 china cat

china cat
  • VibeTribe
  • 15,036 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 02:49 PM

I'm not a beer drinker and purchase organic wine most often..

 

shooting for buying organic everything, but allowing our out to dinner meals to be what they are... if ya eat out, yer eatin gmos and processed crap - just the way of it and I accept that. 

 

wanna find good, organic bread too.

 

aside from that, really need to start juicing again.



#74 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 03:25 PM

I am also the same when it comes to eating out and I enjoy the heck out of it.  :)



#75 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,834 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 23 August 2013 - 03:25 PM

wanna find good, organic bread too.

 

I'll make you some in my bagel shop :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just bring cash.

 

 

 

 

 

 

:joker:



#76 MeOmYo

MeOmYo
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,537 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 03:54 PM

http://www.heidelber....com/albany.htm

 

doesn't look like they go further east than Albany.  Awesome bread.  Not all are organic, but some are.



#77 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 04:42 PM

WIth some products...like bread...you can just read the ingredients and get a good idea of it's worth.

Doesn't necessarily need to be "organic" per say.  Like organic wheat for instance....I find this to be a joke, since our wheat has pretty much taken a turn for the abnorm about 75 years ago.  So, with that...what exactly is organic wheat?



#78 MeOmYo

MeOmYo
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,537 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 04:51 PM

Wende, do you classify selective breeding as nonorganic?

#79 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 05:08 PM

I don't really think too much about certain products..........yet.  So I guess I can't answer that question.  :lol:

 

I'm not really huge on organic and non organic processed food.  For it's all processed and stripped of natural nutrients so some of it is not as important to me. 



#80 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 05:09 PM

But I'm so very open to hear sides of the argument to help me sway to one side or the other.

 

Like, organic crackers for instance?  That just seems pretty silly to me.



#81 MeOmYo

MeOmYo
  • VibeTribe
  • 7,537 posts

Posted 23 August 2013 - 05:39 PM

Yes, it is all processed for its intended use, but the processes vary drastically.  wheat does not have to be processed with bleach to be flour.  there is unbleached flour.  in fact, wheat naturally bleaches itself, but takes time.  Time is $, so most processors use bleach.  Wheat can be grown organically, harvested, shelled, dried and ground to flour without any further processing or any additives.  

 

The nutrients are still there, the same as eating the wheat in the field.  It's just processed for use as flour.

 

an organic cracker is a cracker made with all organic products.  A basic cracker can be made with flour, water & oil.



#82 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,834 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 23 August 2013 - 05:46 PM

Organic doesn't mean simple or unprocessed. It means no chemicals. 

 

Methinks your idea of organic doesn't line up with how it's usually defined. 

 

(Stuffs tasty organic peanut butter cookies in mouth)



#83 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 24 August 2013 - 03:26 AM

But our wheat is so far gone right now......our corn.  WHether or not you use chem's to grow/process it, sort of loses it's importance when youre' talking about something that is so far from organic....

 

Like Organic "canola" oil ;)  Like, really?



#84 Wende

Wende
  • VibeTribe
  • 5,146 posts

Posted 24 August 2013 - 03:32 AM

Organic doesn't mean simple or unprocessed. It means no chemicals. 

 

Methinks your idea of organic doesn't line up with how it's usually defined. 

 

(Stuffs tasty organic peanut butter cookies in mouth)

Simplicity?  Close to nature?

I'm just saying....once you start processing things....it sort of loses it's true form....so much so that it ends up not really  mattering (is that a word?)

 

I really guess it all depends on what you're talking about.  I for one am not going to get too caught up on the "organic" label on anything in a box.  Just my own opinion on the matter.

I'm glad my pantry is bare.....Growing my food and buying fresh has really made a difference when it comes to the shelves.



#85 china cat

china cat
  • VibeTribe
  • 15,036 posts

Posted 02 March 2014 - 10:07 PM

from a friend, regarding Canola - no thanks

 

Extremely high pressure pressing
Extraction by cancerous solvents (hexane)
Bleaching
Deodorizing
Further processing
Highly polyunsaturated - NOT heart healthy
Goes rancid very easily (free radicals)
Not to mention that 95% of the canola has Roundup residue in it.

 



#86 holysmokes

holysmokes
  • VibeTribe
  • 1,870 posts

Posted 03 March 2014 - 02:39 PM

When it comes to oil, the only two I will purchase are olive and coconut. For years I've been telling people who use canola oil that they would be better off using motor oil.

#87 hippieskichick

hippieskichick
  • VibeTribe
  • 2,834 posts
  • LocationAlbany NY

Posted 03 March 2014 - 03:03 PM

from a friend, regarding Canola - no thanks

 

Extremely high pressure pressing
Extraction by cancerous solvents (hexane)
Bleaching
Deodorizing
Further processing
Highly polyunsaturated - NOT heart healthy
Goes rancid very easily (free radicals)
Not to mention that 95% of the canola has Roundup residue in it.

 

 

'Cept this kind. The only kind I use. 

 

44d3856372db0.jpg

 

 

Canola oil, one of the fastest-growing oils in the North American marketplace, is known to be nutritionally sound. Recently, however, outrageously inaccurate articles, letters and emails have appeared portraying canola oil as toxic and the cause of a host of diseases including glaucoma, emphysema, anemia, and even Mad Cow. While the misinformation does seem way beyond belief, this 'canola scare' has raised concerns among some consumers. So what is the truth about canola oil?

The Truth About Canola
In reality, canola oil has been extensively researched and is known within the established scientific community as a nutritious oil. No sound scientific study has ever proven a connection between canola and any disease. Early studies did seem to suggest a possible link between canola oil and toxicity in rats. But further research confirmed that rats, which subsist primarily on grains and vegetables, do not metabolize any oil well, and therefore do not make good lipid research subjects. Unfortunately the flawed studies continue to be cited in error.

And while canola oil has been singled out as having toxic properties, in truth any edible oil can be made nutritionally bankrupt, and even transformed into poison, depending on the techniques used for processing. For instance, flaxseed oil, typically used as a nutritional supplement for its high Omega-3 Fatty Acid content, can be converted via certain processing methods into linseed oil, used in paint applications.

Among the misinformation currently circulating is the notion that due to toxicity, insects won't eat canola plants. Actually, canola is susceptible to numerous pests that thrive in temperate climate zones, so it is grown only in regions that experience extended periods of freezing. 

Spectrum's canola seed is grown exclusively in Canada and the northern USA. As with any other oil, the available nutritional benefit in a bottle of canola oil depends on several factors including seed selection, processing and proper usage. Read on to find out why Spectrum considers canola oil to be one of the best oils—and best values—around.

What is Canola?
Canola, also known as Low Erucic Acid Rapeseed, was developed in the 1970s from mustard rape, a member of the mustard family. Oil seed from mustard rape, usually called rapeseed, has been in use for more than three thousand years. The Canadian government coined the term 'canola' (for 'Canada Oil') due to the negative association of the word 'rapeseed.'

Canola today has very different fatty acid composition and flavor than rapeseed. It has been hybridized from rapeseed to yield a good all purpose cooking oil with a high monounsaturated fat content similar to olive oil, a low saturated fat content, a very low level of erucic acid for neutral flavor, and good shelf stability to discourage rancidity.

Not All Canola is Created Equal
Since the canola scare is an urban legend and the scientific community endorses canola oil, will any bottle do? The answer is no. Two canola oils sitting side by side on the shelf may have arrived there in very different ways. Here we will illustrate by examining different approaches to three steps in the production of canola oil: seed selection, extraction and processing.

SEED SELECTION: Genetically Engineered vs. Naturally Hybridized
A prevalent canola myth involves the supposed role of genetic engineering in its development. Extensively used beginning in the 1990s, genetic engineering involves actual gene manipulation—inserting genes from a different plant (or even species) into host cell nuclei.

Canola predates genetic engineering by two decades and was originally developed through a very different process, hybridization. Practiced for centuries and perfected by Luther Burbank in the 1920s, hybridization is a natural, iterative process where plants are selected for certain desired characteristics, then bred to produce a new crop that displays those attributes in greater abundance.

Unfortunately, today genetic engineering is becoming widely practiced on some plants and canola has quickly become one of the most genetically altered crops. Experts estimate that fifty-five percent of the 2000 North American canola crop was genetically engineered. This means that consumers who want to avoid genetically engineered (GE) products need to take special care in choosing canola oil.

Spectrum uses no GE canola whatsoever. Prior to use, we test all Spectrum canola seed and oil at a third party lab, which verifies non-GE status through sensitive DNA analysis. Because organic certification agencies prohibit GEs, Spectrum Naturals Organic Canola Oil is by definition non-GE, but we test its seed and oil to eliminate the small (but growing) possibility of wind drift contamination from GE fields.

EXTRACTION: Hexane Extracted vs. Expeller Pressed
Mass market oils are typically extracted from seed using a petroleum product called hexane. Conventional manufacturers like hexane because it is highly efficient, pulling almost 100% of the oil from seed. Because hexane evaporates during processing, the FDA does not require it to be declared on the label. But some consumers are concerned about potential chemical residues, and hexane is notoriously harmful to the environment. Natural oils, including Spectrum Naturals, are crushed from seed using the hydraulic action of an expeller press. Expeller pressing yields less oil than chemical extraction, usually about 50-70% of the oil, so expeller pressed oils are usually more expensive than conventionally processed oils. They are also much kinder to the environment.

PROCESSING: Use vs. Nonuse of Chemical Preservatives
Most cooking oils are processed to produce a more neutral taste profile and to remove naturally occurring substances that if allowed to remain would cause the oil to foam, pop or smoke when subjected to heat. Unfortunately, mass produced oils are further processed to extend shelf life by adding carcinogenic antioxidants such as BHT, BHA and TBHQ. In constrast, chemical preservatives are never added to Spectrum Naturals oils.

When to Choose Canola Oil
Every oil has a smoke point, the temperature at which it begins to smoke. Oil should never be allowed to smoke as it compromises nutritional value and releases carcinogenic free radicals. High monounsaturate oils such as canola are a good all-purpose choice because they can generally take higher heat than polyunsaturated oils like safflower, sunflower and soybean. 

Extra virgin olive oil and canola oil make great partners in the kitchen. Because the rich flavor in extra virgin olive oil dissipates when sustained heat is applied, save this more expensive oil for salad dressings, light sautés and for use as a condiment. Canola oil has a similar fatty acid profile to olive oil and is a great value. Choose Spectrum Naturals Canola Oil or Organic Canola Oil when you need a neutral flavored cooking oil for use up to medium high heat (375°F). For higher heat up to 450°F, select Spectrum Naturals High Heat Canola for its extra high monounsaturate content and super high heat tolerance.



#88 china cat

china cat
  • VibeTribe
  • 15,036 posts

Posted 05 March 2014 - 02:37 AM

I'll have to look into Spectrum. I don't entirely trust that info if they are the ones who published it. i'll do some diggin. I would like to have an oil to cook with. I love coconut oil, but I don't like cooking with it - everything tastes like coconut (and I don't want to purchase the refined coconut oiled because that seems crappy to me). And, I don't like to heat olive oil. Canola would be a nice option if I could trust it.



#89 Julius

Julius
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,382 posts

Posted 05 March 2014 - 03:05 AM

AquAdvantage: new GMO salmon pending FDA approval, already approved in Canada.

 

The pitch for it is that it grows twice as fast. 

 

I'm disturbed by this. Although almost as disturbing is the unscientific hyperbole put forth by the opposition to it.



#90 Julius

Julius
  • VibeTribe
  • 11,382 posts

Posted 05 March 2014 - 03:06 AM

I would totally try a Halibass though  :lol: 



#91 holysmokes

holysmokes
  • VibeTribe
  • 1,870 posts

Posted 11 March 2014 - 02:57 AM

LOL, love the new gif in your sig. Is Bobby taking a dive on stage? Timber!