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RC: uses calculus and trigonometry in their day to day life...


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#1 hoagie

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 11:23 AM

Not signed

#2 August West

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 11:47 AM

A Native American chief goes to his medicine man and states I have
three squaws and many daughters.  I need a son to become chief when I
die.  What can I do to beget a son?

 

The medicine man goes to the holy mountain and fasts, chants, and
beats himself with sacred branches.  After several weeks, he returns
to the chief and says It has been revealed to me.  You shall gird
your loins and save your seed until the next full moon.  Then, when
the moon is full you should lie with each of your squaws in her turn.
You will be rewarded for your obedience.

 

The Chief follows these directions and when the moon is next full,
goes first to the squaw in the teepee on the antelope hide.  He next
goes to the squaw in the teepee on the buffalo hide.  And finally he
goes to the third squaw, the one in the teepee on the hippopotamus
hide.  

Nine moons later, as the full moon shines on the encampment, all three
squaws go into labor.

The chief awaits the outcome in his teepee, smoking the sacred pipe.

Finally, a messenger comes.  The squaw on the antelope hide has
had a boy papoose!

The Chief has barely begun to celebrate when the second messenger
comes.  The squaw on the buffalo hide has had another boy
papoose!

And before his elation can really hit him, the third messenger
announces: the squaw on the hippopotamus hide has had twin boy
papooses!

The Chief is overcome, and hurries to the medicine man.  I have been
without a male offspring for many, many moons.  Now I suddenly have
four.  What is the meaning of this great sign?

The medicine man hurries to the sacred mountain and begins his chants,
fasts, and self-beatings.  A few days later he returns to the Chief.

The meaning of this great sign has been revealed to me:

The sum of the sons of the squaw on the hippopotamus is equal to the
sum of the sons of the squaws on the other two hides.



#3 Deadshow Dan

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 01:41 PM

signed

(since you say day to day, and not daily)

-SOH CAH TOA



#4 August West

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 01:42 PM

when i went to school we had to look that shit up on tables!



#5 hoagie

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 01:46 PM

Shit is useless for most people

#6 MeOmYo

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:17 PM

trig, all the time.  calculus, hardly ever.



#7 Feesh

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:20 PM

Shit is useless for most people

...except when you're driving on a road, living in a house, sitting on a chair, standing on a floor, measuring the space on a wall, etc.
I.e. the principles of those two mathematical fields permeate your everyday life and whether or not you know it, someone had to at one point (lest your house fall down).



#8 Count P-Funk

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:23 PM

signed.

more calculus than trigonometry but use both regularly. 



#9 concert andy

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:30 PM

I have a BS in Mathematics.

 

Calculas is used in tracking asteroids.  Engineers use it everyday.

 

Trig is prolly used more by blue color workers, when they need to make a triangle or angled cut.



#10 concert andy

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:33 PM

Applications of Calculus

 

Credit card companies use calculus to set the minimum payments due on credit card statements at the exact time the statement is processed by considering multiple variables such as changing interest rates and a fluctuating available balance.

 

Biologists use differential calculus to determine the exact rate of growth in a bacterial culture when different variables such as temperature and food source are changed. This research can help increase the rate of growth of necessary bacteria, or decrease the rate of growth for harmful and potentially threatening bacteria.

 

An electrical engineer uses integration to determine the exact length of power cable needed to connect two substations that are miles apart. Because the cable is hung from poles, it is constantly curving. Calculus allows a precise figure to be determined.

 

An architect will use integration to determine the amount of materials necessary to construct a curved dome over a new sports arena, as well as calculate the weight of that dome and determine the type of support structure required.

 

Space flight engineers frequently use calculus when planning lengthy missions. To launch an exploratory probe, they must consider the different orbiting velocities of the Earth and the planet the probe is targeted for, as well as other gravitational influences like the sun and the moon. Calculus allows each of those variables to be accurately taken into account.

 

Statisticians will use calculus to evaluate survey data to help develop business plans for different companies. Because a survey involves many different questions with a range of possible answers, calculus allows a more accurate prediction for appropriate action.

 

physicist uses calculus to find the center of mass of a sports utility vehicle to design appropriate safety features that must adhere to federal specifications on different road surfaces and at different speeds.

 

An operations research analyst will use calculus when observing different processes at a manufacturing corporation. By considering the value of different variables, they can help a company improve operating efficiency, increase production, and raise profits.

 

graphics artist uses calculus to determine how different three-dimensional models will behave when subjected to rapidly changing conditions. This can create a realistic environment for movies or video games.



#11 concert andy

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:35 PM

 
Trigonometry and Architecture
You cannot separate architecture from trigonometry, which is critical for curving surfaces in building materials such as steel and glass. The science is used to find the heights of buildings, or create dimensional objects to use in buildings. Trigonometry is used to make demarcations for cubicles in an office building. It is useful when designing a building to predetermine geometrical patterns and how much material and labor will required in order to erect a structure. When the building is erected, it will not only be strong, it will have accurate measurements.
 
Digital Imaging
The same science is used in the music industry. Sound travels in waves that is used in developing computer generated music. A computer will not understand music like a human being; instead it represents it mathematically by its constituent sound waves. Precisely, sound engineers who work in advancing computer music and hi-tech composers have to apply the basic law of trigonometry such as the cosine and sine function. Music waves patterns are are not as regular as sine and cosine function, but it is still helpful in developing computer music.
 
Navigation, Geography and Astronomy
Triangulation, which is an application of trigonometry, is used by astronomers to calculate the distance to the nearby stars. In geography, it is used to measures the distance between landmarks. It is also used in satellite navigation systems. For instance, a pilot taking off from JFK airport in New York will have to know which angle to take off from and when to turn at a certain angle in the sky in order to reach Heathrow airport in London.


#12 TEO

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:47 PM

More of a basic math, algebra and geometry type.



#13 hoagie

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 03:12 PM

 
Trigonometry and Architecture
You cannot separate architecture from trigonometry, which is critical for curving surfaces in building materials such as steel and glass. The science is used to find the heights of buildings, or create dimensional objects to use in buildings. Trigonometry is used to make demarcations for cubicles in an office building. It is useful when designing a building to predetermine geometrical patterns and how much material and labor will required in order to erect a structure. When the building is erected, it will not only be strong, it will have accurate measurements.
 
Digital Imaging
The same science is used in the music industry. Sound travels in waves that is used in developing computer generated music. A computer will not understand music like a human being; instead it represents it mathematically by its constituent sound waves. Precisely, sound engineers who work in advancing computer music and hi-tech composers have to apply the basic law of trigonometry such as the cosine and sine function. Music waves patterns are are not as regular as sine and cosine function, but it is still helpful in developing computer music.
 
Navigation, Geography and Astronomy
Triangulation, which is an application of trigonometry, is used by astronomers to calculate the distance to the nearby stars. In geography, it is used to measures the distance between landmarks. It is also used in satellite navigation systems. For instance, a pilot taking off from JFK airport in New York will have to know which angle to take off from and when to turn at a certain angle in the sky in order to reach Heathrow airport in London.

 

quite informative.



#14 Java Time

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 03:12 PM

I use a calculus cuz I'm bad at math

#15 Eddie Z

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 03:32 PM

Although I graduated engineering school, and was forced to take engineering math classes, all the way up past trig and calc.. to Differential Equations...    I don't use much of it in real life even as an Engineer!     

 

The most complicated I get now is when I'm trying to scale up or scale down a recipe, based on the limited availability of one single ingredient.     Ex.   I have 1 cup of milk, but the recipe calls for 2.5 cups of milk...   Oh, and the other basic math I might do is in regard to distance/time calculations:    ex:  I can hike at a rate of 1.5 mph...how long will it take me to backpack 8 miles.   

 

Perhaps the most advanced math I ever have to apply is splitting the costs of a festival run with 2 or 3 people!   LOL 



#16 hoagie

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 03:53 PM

This is my point....it is a very small number of people who need to apply calculus or trigonometry in their day to day existence, and an even small number who use it OUTSIDE of their trade...

#17 Deadshow Dan

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 05:46 PM

I don't get what your point is.

 

Are you upset at having to learn trig and calc?



#18 Feesh

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:21 PM

While I never use Fortran or Pascal in my professional life, it was the process that I benifit most from. Mathematics (from arithmetic through calculus and on up to diff. eqs) teaches your brain to solve problems and process information logically. It's not the specific knowledge, but rather in the process of learning these disciplines that the benefit is realized.

Although I graduated engineering school, and was forced to take engineering math classes, all the way up past trig and calc.. to Differential Equations...    I don't use much of it in real life even as an Engineer!


#19 cheeseweasel

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:27 PM

I use basic, algebra and geometry in my profession as electronic prepress and graphic design.

#20 Feesh

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:27 PM

...sort of like how most people will never actually play the Recorder in their lives, but still were benefitted by the process of learning a musical instrument.



#21 concert andy

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:29 PM

While I never use Fortran or Pascal in my professional life, it was the process that I benifit most from. Mathematics (from arithmetic through calculus and on up to diff. eqs) teaches your brain to solve problems and process information logically. It's not the specific knowledge, but rather in the process of learning these disciplines that the benefit is realized.

 

 

While this is true, I was just good at math and found it easy to solve math equations.  In HS teachers hated me because I would do the math in my head and just blurt out the answer.  I was usually right too.

 

Although Diff Eq had a lot of integrals and crazy algebra, I thought that was the easiest class of all my math classes.

 

I am taking grad courses in Computer Science and they have 2 or 3 classes based on how to create Algorithms based on the problem presented.



#22 hoagie

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:30 PM

...sort of like how most people will never actually play the Recorder in their lives, but still were benefitted by the process of learning a musical instrument.

debatable...



#23 concert andy

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:32 PM

...sort of like how most people will never actually play the Recorder in their lives, but still were benefitted by the process of learning a musical instrument.

 

I always thought my math brain was the reason for me liking the drums.  The drums are usually very linear.



#24 DF

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:33 PM

mostly relational theory



#25 hoagie

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:33 PM

I always thought my math brain was the reason for me liking the drums.  The drums are usually very linear.

 

i dont understand



#26 concert andy

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:42 PM

i dont understand

 

The timing is linear for most songs.  Meaning for x minutes, the beat is more or less the same.

 

There may be a fill here and there, but it always gets back to the original timing of the song.



#27 hoagie

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 06:42 PM

The timing is linear for most songs.  Meaning for x minutes, the beat is more or less the same.

 

There may be a fill here and there, but it always gets back to the original timing of the song.

 

in some genres



#28 MeOmYo

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 08:05 PM

45530_407890622632133_1507496649_n.jpg



#29 hoagie

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 08:24 PM

:lol:



#30 Tabbooma

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 11:56 PM

Tabbooma likes to count with his toes ;)



#31 nikkiblue

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:32 AM

...sort of like how most people will never actually play the Recorder in their lives, but still were benefitted by the process of learning a musical instrument.

 

 

I LOVED playing the recorder.... It was fun.   but your so right. lol..  

 

Do they still even do that in school? 



#32 nikkiblue

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 12:34 AM

YYRN22B_ip.jpg



#33 hoagie

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 01:46 PM



#34 Feesh

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:11 PM

debatable...

...of course just saying that it's debatable doesn't actually constitute a debate. :moon:



#35 roo

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 10:01 PM

I do as a Carpenter and Builder. Every day.