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IRELAND WOMAN DIES AFTER BEING DENIED AN ABORTION IN THE HOSPITAL Read more: http://www.classwarfareexists.com/ireland-woman-dies-after-being-denied


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#151 china cat

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:23 AM

another article. different perspective

Halappanavar's husband, Praveen, said doctors at University Hospital Galway in western Ireland determined she was miscarrying within hours of her hospitalization for severe pain on Sunday, Oct. 21. He said over the next three days, doctors refused their requests for an abortion to combat her surging pain and fading health.
The hospital declined to say whether doctors believed Halappanavar's blood poisoning could have been reversed had she received an abortion rather than waiting for the fetus to die on its own. In a statement, it described its own investigation into the death, and a parallel probe by the government's Health Service Executive, as "standard practice" whenever a pregnant woman dies in a hospital. The Galway coroner also planned a public inquest.


Savita Halappanavar, Death: Irish Woman Denied Abortion Dies From Blood Poisoning


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Ireland, Video, Savita Halappanavar, Savita Halappanavar Abortion, Savita Halappanavar Death, Savita Halappanavar Dies, Ireland Abortion Denial, Irish Woman Abortion Denial, World News

DUBLIN — The debate over legalizing abortion in Ireland flared Wednesday after the government confirmed that a woman in the midst of a miscarriage was refused an abortion and died in an Irish hospital after suffering from blood poisoning.
Prime Minister Enda Kenny said he was awaiting findings from three investigations into the death of Savita Halappanavar, a 31-year-old Indian woman who was 17 weeks pregnant. Her case highlighted the legal limbo in which pregnant women facing severe health problems can find themselves in predominantly Catholic Ireland.
Ireland's constitution officially bans abortion, but a 1992 Supreme Court ruling found the procedure should be legalized for situations when the woman's life is at risk from continuing the pregnancy. Five governments since have refused to pass a law resolving the confusion, leaving Irish hospitals reluctant to terminate pregnancies except in the most obviously life-threatening circumstances.
The vast bulk of Irish women wanting abortions, an estimated 4,000 per year, simply travel next door to England, where abortion has been legal on demand since 1967. But that option is difficult, if not impossible, for women in failing health.
Halappanavar's husband, Praveen, said doctors at University Hospital Galway in western Ireland determined she was miscarrying within hours of her hospitalization for severe pain on Sunday, Oct. 21. He said over the next three days, doctors refused their requests for an abortion to combat her surging pain and fading health.
The hospital declined to say whether doctors believed Halappanavar's blood poisoning could have been reversed had she received an abortion rather than waiting for the fetus to die on its own. In a statement, it described its own investigation into the death, and a parallel probe by the government's Health Service Executive, as "standard practice" whenever a pregnant woman dies in a hospital. The Galway coroner also planned a public inquest.
"Savita was really in agony. She was very upset, but she accepted she was losing the baby," he told The Irish Times in a telephone interview from Belgaum, southwest India. "When the consultant came on the ward rounds on Monday morning, Savita asked if they could not save the baby, could they induce to end the pregnancy? The consultant said: `As long as there is a fetal heartbeat, we can't do anything.'
"Again on Tuesday morning ... the consultant said it was the law, that this is a Catholic country. Savita said: `I am neither Irish nor Catholic' but they said there was nothing they could do," Praveen Halappanavar said.
He said his wife vomited repeatedly and collapsed in a restroom that night, but doctors wouldn't terminate the fetus because its heart was still beating.

The fetus died the following day and its remains were surgically removed. Within hours, Savita was placed under sedation in intensive care with blood poisoning and he was never able to speak with her again, her husband said. By Saturday, her heart, kidneys and liver had stopped working. She was pronounced dead early Sunday,


http://www.huffingto..._n_2128696.html

wow, really sad. They should have done more. I feel for her family

#152 deadheadskier

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:25 AM

another article. different perspective

Halappanavar's husband, Praveen, said doctors at University Hospital Galway in western Ireland determined she was miscarrying within hours of her hospitalization for severe pain on Sunday, Oct. 21. He said over the next three days, doctors refused their requests for an abortion to combat her surging pain and fading health.


Sorry, a bit late to the party/epic circular abortion thread of the day, but I need a bit of clarification on this statement.

The statement is that it was medically determined that the woman was miscarrying. If it was medically determined that the fetus would not survive inside the woman, then what is the expectation? That the fetus dies before it is removed as for it to not be considered abortion?

It's horribly sad that this woman and her baby died.

What I want to know is what exactly was done to try and save her and her baby's life. If it's been medically determined that the woman was miscarrying, then that to me means the baby has to come out immediately. Whether the result is premature live birth with a glimmer of a chance of saving the life or premature live birth resultant in immediate death of that child, the child needs to come out if it's been medically determined that the child won't survive in the womb.

#153 hoagie

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 07:28 AM

Sorry, a bit late to the party/epic circular abortion thread of the day, but I need a bit of clarification on this statement.

The statement is that it was medically determined that the woman was miscarrying. If it was medically determined that the fetus would not survive inside the woman, then what is the expectation? That the fetus dies before it is removed as for it to not be considered abortion?

It's horribly sad that this woman and her baby died.

What I want to know is what exactly was done to try and save her and her baby's life. If it's been medically determined that the woman was miscarrying, then that to me means the baby has to come out immediately. Whether the result is premature live birth with a glimmer of a chance of saving the life or premature live birth resultant in immediate death of that child, the child needs to come out if it's been medically determined that the child won't survive in the womb.


Seems rather obvious that the law caused both lives to be lost, in this case. More accurately, a technicality caused neglegent innaction to occur, which resultd in the mother's eventual death, all because of Irish law.

#154 china cat

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:45 PM

Sorry, a bit late to the party/epic circular abortion thread of the day, but I need a bit of clarification on this statement.

The statement is that it was medically determined that the woman was miscarrying. If it was medically determined that the fetus would not survive inside the woman, then what is the expectation? That the fetus dies before it is removed as for it to not be considered abortion?

It's horribly sad that this woman and her baby died.

What I want to know is what exactly was done to try and save her and her baby's life. If it's been medically determined that the woman was miscarrying, then that to me means the baby has to come out immediately. Whether the result is premature live birth with a glimmer of a chance of saving the life or premature live birth resultant in immediate death of that child, the child needs to come out if it's been medically determined that the child won't survive in the womb.


Completely agree.

#155 MeOmYo

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 02:35 PM

how did this thread make it to P&R?

#156 Tim the Beek

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 02:51 PM

Prolly cuz the topic is both a political and a religious hot button? Prolly.

#157 PeaceFrog

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 04:10 PM

prolly cuz I was courteous enough to post it here.

#158 concert andy

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 06:12 PM

prolly cause Joker farted in this thread. Prolly.

#159 Joker

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 02:14 PM

Doing nothing on abortion 'not an option' - Reilly


The Minister for Health James Reilly has said doing nothing in relation to the issue of abortion is not an option.

Speaking on RTE's News at One this afternoon, he extended his sympathies to Ms Halappanavar's family and confirmed he would be bringing the report of the expert group on abortion to Cabinet on Tuesday week.

"I have read the report and I need to study it further. It's a hugely complex issue that has divided the country ... and we're not going to solve it in a matter of weeks," he said.

He said it would be a "derogation of duty" not to deal with the issue saying every woman had a right to have legal clarity regarding the treatment available to her.

He confirmed that Ms Halappanavar's family would have input into the terms of reference of the inquiry into her death.

Dr Reilly's comments come a day after thousands of people attended candlelight vigils in Dublin, Galway, Kilkenny, Carlow and London yesterday evening to demand the Government legislate on abortion following the death of Savita Halappanavar.

Beginning at the Garden of Remembrance, the Dublin march crossed O’Connell Bridge and snaked its way towards Dáil Eireann.

It was headed by a giant banner which read “Never Again”, adorned with images of the 31-year-old Indian dentist.

Organisers of the Dublin march said about 20,000 people had turned out, but a Garda spokeswoman said they estimated the figure to be between 10,000 and 12,000.


More including video

http://www.irishtime.../breaking3.html

#160 concert andy

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 03:01 PM

I was going to let this die but ....


And before I start, the doctors do have the moral duty in this case, but you inserted your opinion in as a doctor by saying "Nope but I don't see the chances of possibly saving 1 life as reason enough to definitely take another".
This popular opinion is what led us to this point, and not seeing that is what you may be missing.

You're throwing around that "round about" reasoning like it means something. That's just your opinion of what you think I was trying to say, rather than what I actually said. Hell, don't the doctors also have a moral duty to protect all lives?


Round about reasoning i refer to is simple. Read what another person posts, and form an opinion of your opinion. This happens in life all the time. Either people will call you out for non sense, or let it go and deem it not worthy of discussing further.

Also, please clarify what you said.

Well "seemed to be" doesn't mean it's true. Why not just ask me rather than talk shit?


Why should I have to ask you your opinion? I do not ask anyone else their opinion here. Why should you be different?

Although I should know better by now, because in mind you are a walking anomaly. You come across on occasion in threads as an insensitive arse, but then you come back and say you are for the other side of the argument all along. Even though your posted words do not follow what you think you believe in.

And this is where I feel to take shots at you on occasion, and at least I will own it when I do take a shot, because I am slowly becoming an old white male. The irony is I am the next generation from you Joker, a 40 year old male, and soon to be lumped in "old white male way of thinking".


TASB - while I may have done this earlier, the reason I did, and feel I can is because I am part of that group of people. I am a representative of that group of thinking, or soon will be so I feel I can disparage my own group if I want.


What does this have to do with giving me shit over my opinion?



You put yourself in the line of fire because the reason this person died, is because of the fact that MANY people in IRELAND feel the way you did in your comment that started this nonsense.

I don't see the chances of possibly saving 1 life as reason enough to definitely take another

All your comment was missing was no matter what, and with the story posted about this as the lead of this thread and your comment being the 6th response to this thread, implied that you felt this way no matter what.

This may be wrong, but may be take a second and read what you wrote. If it is sarcasm, say so, if you come off wrong say so we do not get into a tit for tat about semantics. Either own what your post, or clarify your opinion sooner with out all the nonsense.

#161 Joker

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 03:34 PM

You're wrong, I didn't insert my opinion in as a doctor, I inserted it in as a person. I also said it wasn't right to lose 2 lives when one could be saved.

However I don't believe it's acceptable to take the life of another when it's illegal to do so on the "chance that it MIGHT save someone else.

Call it nonsense if you want but it's no more nonsensical than sanctioning murder because it could possibly save someone else

#162 deadheadskier

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 03:48 PM

Joker,

It was medically determined the woman was miscarrying. That means the fetus needs to come out. It wasn't going to survive in her womb.

#163 concert andy

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 03:51 PM

You're wrong, I didn't insert my opinion in as a doctor, I inserted it in as a person. I also said it wasn't right to lose 2 lives when one could be saved.

However I don't believe it's acceptable to take the life of another when it's illegal to do so on the "chance that it MIGHT save someone else.

Call it nonsense if you want but it's no more nonsensical than sanctioning murder because it could possibly save someone else


Please clarify cause it still sounds like an oxy moran to me.

#164 Joker

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 03:59 PM

Joker,

It was medically determined the woman was miscarrying. That means the fetus needs to come out. It wasn't going to survive in her womb.

The laws obviously need to be changed but until then taking the life is akin to murder and apparently in this case there were no doctors willing to take one life on the chance it might save another.

#165 Joker

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 04:03 PM

Please clarify cause it still sounds like an oxy moran to me.

Nobody should be forced to break the law and kill just because someone else feels they should

#166 deadheadskier

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 04:16 PM

Do you consider removing someone from life support killing?

Is that allowed in Ireland?

To me, that's what this pretty much is. The child wasn't going to survive. The "life support" was the mothers womb.

Maybe I'm wrong, but I doubt there would have been a conviction of the performing doctor had he/she done the right thing.

#167 Joker

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 04:26 PM

That would probably depend on the circumstances. I don't consider the decision to remove my mother, who was brain dead, from life support as killing her but others might see it as such.

Maybe you are wrong but maybe you're not and the doctor could wind up in jail.

Plus, for all we know the doctor was against abortion and he feels he did do the right thing.

#168 concert andy

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 04:26 PM

Nobody should be forced to break the law and kill just because someone else feels they should


The doctors are paid by the government in Ireland. The doctor's had the other side weighing heavily against them to do what the law states.

They chose their jobs over jail.


I would have chosen her life.

But may be they made a martyr of her, and the laws will be changed.

#169 Joker

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 04:45 PM

The doctors are paid by the government in Ireland. The doctor's had the other side weighing heavily against them to do what the law states.

They chose their jobs over jail.


I would have chosen her life.

But may be they made a martyr of her, and the laws will be changed.


Can you say for sure that the doctor's don't believe taking that life is tantamount to murder?

Can you say they didn't do what they thought was morally right rather than just choosing their jobs over the law?

Hell, for all we know they might even refuse to practice medicine if the laws were different and they were to be forced to end the lives of innocent victims.

#170 hoagie

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 05:38 PM

Can you say for sure that the doctor's don't believe taking that life is tantamount to murder?

Can you say they didn't do what they thought was morally right rather than just choosing their jobs over the law?

Hell, for all we know they might even refuse to practice medicine if the laws were different and they were to be forced to end the lives of innocent victims.


:facepalm:

#171 concert andy

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 06:12 PM

Can you say for sure that the doctor's don't believe taking that life is tantamount to murder?

Can you say they didn't do what they thought was morally right rather than just choosing their jobs over the law?

Hell, for all we know they might even refuse to practice medicine if the laws were different and they were to be forced to end the lives of innocent victims.


No, but those questions you pose are what I feel a pro life person would use to defend their opinion on the entire situation, regardless of this situation. Do you at least see the irony in the logic here?

All I am doing is using the facts of the case to form an opinion, of which is more should and could have been done to save her life.

And the vigils all around Ireland seem to favor this similar opinion.

#172 Joker

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 06:33 PM

Those are questions anyone that cares to know the whole story BEFORE forming an opinion would pose. Do I see the irony in the logic of asking legitimate questions rather than just assuming "my stance" is correct and pretending to know what the doctors were thinking and why they did what they did? No, I don't see any irony in that.

You seem to be taking what little "facts" we do know and trying to squeeze them into your narrative whether they fit or not.

#173 hoagie

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 06:40 PM

The doctors in this situation did nothing to sve the life of the woman because Irish law prevented them from doing anything.

Where does the doctors personal beliefs even come into play here?

#174 concert andy

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 02:17 PM

Those are questions anyone that cares to know the whole story BEFORE forming an opinion would pose. Do I see the irony in the logic of asking legitimate questions rather than just assuming "my stance" is correct and pretending to know what the doctors were thinking and why they did what they did? No, I don't see any irony in that.

You seem to be taking what little "facts" we do know and trying to squeeze them into your narrative whether they fit or not.


Obviously those are questions anyone would ask, including me,

My point which you glossed over is that those are arguments from people on the right cling to with dear life. That is all I did, point out the fact that your counterpoint is the rights or the pro choice argument. I did not try to fit it in to a narrative, I am not a spin doctor.

Why can't you own your opinion?

I don't see the chances of possibly saving 1 life as reason enough to definitely take another


You stated something, and now 4 pages later you state I have a narrative?

I was first shocked that you were so insensitive with your original comment. 4 pages later I point out every inconsistency in your story, but it is still me that is WRONG.

#175 hoagie

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 02:27 PM

No one is right or wrong. Joker is very pro-life PERSONALLY ( but believes everyone has a right to murder their own fetus i they choose). He also would not perform an abortion to save a mothers life if he were a doctor.

Thats clear enough i think.

#176 concert andy

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 02:40 PM

No one is right or wrong. Joker is very pro-life PERSONALLY ( but believes everyone has a right to murder their own fetus i they choose). He also would not perform an abortion to save a mothers life if he were a doctor.

Thats clear enough i think.


I know how he feels, but to ask rhetorical questions in response to a question, that just furthers the argument.

#177 concert andy

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 02:55 PM

No one is right or wrong. Joker is very pro-life PERSONALLY ( but believes everyone has a right to murder their own fetus i they choose). He also would not perform an abortion to save a mothers life if he were a doctor.

Thats clear enough i think.


Oh snap, you are trying to make Joker Mad, you wont like joker when he is mad.

#178 Joker

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 03:19 PM

I have no problem at all owning my opinion. Where have I not owned it? What inconsistencies have there been?

#179 hoagie

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 03:25 PM

I have no problem at all owning my opinion. Where have I not owned it? What inconsistencies have there been?


I own my opinion by boldly stating it in a way that cant be misunderstood,. Maybe uou can follow that example.

#180 Joker

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 03:48 PM

I own my opinion by boldly stating it in a way that cant be misunderstood,. Maybe uou can follow that example.

You mean like this?


Nope but I don't see the chances of possibly saving 1 life as reason enough to definitely take another


Which, by the way, was a reply to you in regards to a question I asked that you didn't bother answering.

#181 hoagie

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 03:52 PM

So dont get offended when i say you remind me of my grandpa, and own your outdated and frankly narrowmided opinion.

Honestly, its nice that people can't live forever. Mindsets like my grandpa's and yours are dying out, and its a good thing for everyone.

#182 Tim the Beek

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 04:01 PM

...it in a way that cant be misunderstood,. Maybe uou...


um...

:funny1:

#183 concert andy

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 04:19 PM

I have no problem at all owning my opinion. Where have I not owned it? What inconsistencies have there been?


The inconsistency is with your original comment, and your actual feelings on the issue.

Original comment: insensitive, and something a pro life person would say.

Most of your follow up comments and questions side with the pro life side of the argument. You say this what people should do in life, ask questions of the other side. But if you do not agree with those questions, why pose them in the first place?

Inconsistency: Saying you are pro choice.



Please clarify why I see the inconsistencies, but you do not.

#184 Joker

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 04:32 PM

You said I wasn't owning my opinion. The comment may be insensitive and/or something a pro-life person would say, so what? It's what I said and I'm owning it.

I am pro-choice but that doesn't mean I can't see or understand the other side of the argument. That's not inconsistency, it's being open to discussion about it.




Meanwhile nobody seems to want to even attempt to answer my original question



Is it right to force someone to extinguish the life of another?



#185 concert andy

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 04:39 PM

Is it right to force someone to extinguish the life of another?



No.

You can not force any one to do anything, including a question like this. Duh! Prolly why it went unanswered.

The point for this case, is someone should have done something and gone to jail over it. You think that is forcing someone to do something, and I say it is someone having the moral balls to stand up for something or someone without the power to do so for themselves. May be I watched too much House where this type of moral debate happened on almost every episode.

Someone could have driven her to Northern Ireland. They did not even need to get her on a plane. A 2 hour car ride is all she needed to get help in terminating a pregnancy that ended up killing a person who did nothing to deserve the end she got.

Again my point is many people could have done more in this case, and the vigils in Ireland about this seem to favor my opinion.

#186 Joker

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 05:03 PM

Oh, is that your point? Because your first post said nothing about that and was just talking shit about me.

Then you went into me not owning my opinion when I had been owning it right from the start.

I also stated on the very first page I would have gone and found someone who could do something to save her. I wonder why her husband didn't bother to drive her to Northern Ireland himself. He must be pro-life.

#187 concert andy

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 05:13 PM

Oh, is that your point? Because your first post said nothing about that and was just talking shit about me.

Then you went into me not owning my opinion when I had been owning it right from the start.

I also stated on the very first page I would have gone and found someone who could do something to save her. I wonder why her husband didn't bother to drive her to Northern Ireland himself. He must be pro-life.



My first comment was the following and made no points at all.

Again, an issue, and Joker is on the side of the aging old school white man.

I am surprised almost daily.




Second post was this:

Posted ImageJoker, on 15 November 2012 - 10:22 AM, said:

So are you on the side that believes someone has the right to force another to take a life?

In this case, ABSO-FREAKING-LUTELY.

You would let someone slowly die from blood poisoning for three days? No matter the circumstance?





Please get it right, Hoagie stated you should own your comments, I either agreed or reiterated his point, some where on page 2 or 3.


I tried to tailor each response to your sensitivities, like answering your response, instead of what you did in this response. Half remember how it all went down.


#188 Joker

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 05:46 PM

And you were still asking why I can't own my opinion on this page this morning. While continuing the mocking you've done since the start.

It's all good, I see where you're coming from now and in the future I will offer you the same civility and respect that you've shown me.

#189 concert andy

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 05:47 PM

And you were still asking why I can't own my opinion on this page this morning. While continuing the mocking you've done since the start.

It's all good, I see where you're coming from now and in the future I will offer you the same civility and respect that you've shown me.


Like I mentioned, I did not say you should own your comment until later, because I saw the inconsistency in the logic later.

Do you see where I am coming from, or are you mocking me in the same way?

#190 concert andy

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 05:12 PM

Sounds like I had the facts correct, except I did not know it was legal in Ireland to give an abortion when the mother's life is at risk, I think in this case her Life was as risk along with her health. I think the two of these words should be synonymous when it comes to someones health.

PS. I am a Catholic, who disagrees with my Church.


http://www.cnn.com/2....html?hpt=hp_c1


Galway, Ireland (CNN) -- One fateful day in October, life changed forever for Praveen Halappanavar.

The engineer from India, who had settled in Ireland four years earlier with his wife, Savita, found himself suddenly a widower.

Savita, a 31-year-old dentist, had died of blood poisoning after being denied an abortion for a miscarrying fetus under Ireland's strict laws, her husband says.

A month later, Halappanavar is without his beloved partner and the child they both longed for -- and now fears the truth behind her tragic death may be lost, too.

"We've seen some tampering (with) the medical records -- basically some key information in the medical reports is missing," he told CNN.

The missing notes concern the couple's requests to hospital staff for a termination, Halappanavar said.

The Galway/Roscommon University Hospitals Group has declined to comment on his claim.

Meanwhile, heath authorities have already launched one inquiry into Savita's death, and a second into the care of critically ill patients was announced by the Board of the Health Information and Quality Authority on Friday.

Read more: Woman's death prompts abortion debate in Ireland

But whatever conclusions are reached, they won't diminish her husband's grief.

Prospects for the couple, who married after meeting in India, had looked so bright. Together they had dreams of a beautiful future in Galway -- of children, forming a family.

"She was looking forward ... in a way she found she was in the right place," said her husband. "She was well-organized too. She knew what she wanted in life. That's why she had decided to settle here in the long term."

When Savita, an attractive woman who loved to dance, became pregnant they were overjoyed. But then their ordeal began.

Seventeen weeks into her pregnancy Savita began suffering severe back pain, and sought medical help.

Doctors at the Galway University Hospital told her she was miscarrying and that her baby would likely die.

Savita's husband says his wife, who was in extreme pain, asked for a termination, but was told that Ireland is a Catholic country and that the procedure could not be carried out while the fetus was alive.

"We requested a termination," he said. "We wanted to go back, to go home and think about the next pregnancy because it was a planned pregnancy. We were so happy, we wanted to have babies."

Three days after the request for a termination was made, the fetus died and was removed.

Four days later, Savita was dead from a blood infection.

The circumstances of her death have prompted outrage in Ireland. Protests in support of Savita, held not just in Ireland but across the world, have urged the country's politicians to update its abortion laws and prevent similar tragedies.

In Ireland, abortion is legal if the mother's life is at risk, which differs from her health being at risk, said Kitty Holland, a reporter with the Irish Times.

With abortion a hot-button issue in Ireland, there has been political fallout from the controversy, too.

Prime Minister Enda Kenny is under pressure to get Halappanavar to assist with a Health Service Executive inquiry into his wife's death, which was the first investigation set up.

But Halappanavar says government steps so far have done little to inspire confidence, not just because officials took weeks to announce the inquiry, but also because when they did, three of the seven medical professionals on the investigation team were from the same hospital where his wife died.

Although they have now been replaced on the team, other issues remain, Halappanavar said.

"We made a request for termination and there is no note of the request at all, and of the medical notes. The response from the doctor is not in the medical records either."

Asked what he thinks has happened to the information, Halappanavar has no answer.

"We don't know what has happened to it," Halappanavar said. "It is strange that all other information is in there -- when we requested things like tea and toast, and when things like we requested an extra blanket, all that is in the medical notes."

Halappanavar says he will settle for nothing less than a full public inquiry -- one in which the wider health service, not just his wife's death, is investigated by independent experts.

"Every single person in the family asked me how could this happen in a place like Ireland in the 21st century, because it was just so simple," he said.

"When they knew the baby was not going to survive, why not think about the bigger life which was the mother, my wife Savita? And they didn't."

All he wants, he said, is the truth.

#191 PeaceFrog

PeaceFrog
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Posted 24 November 2012 - 07:54 AM

Abortion should be allowed for any reason, and this crap would be completely avoided like here in the United States.