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Map lays out racist election tweets, most originated from southeast


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#51 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 04:58 PM

and the price of peas in China today went up?


Oh, sure. Just blame it on Asian people now. :rolleyes:

#52 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 04:59 PM

what in the world is the point of this discussion, anyway?

are you trying to prove that you're an educated racist, or something?

#53 concert andy

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:06 PM

If you can't see how using the term to insult someone isn't offensive I really don't know what to tell you? Common sense says if you're calling someone something with the intent to offend them then what you're saying is going to be meant to be offensive.

Those on the left using "redneck" to describe people who don't vote with them aren't using it to literally describe their red necks, they're using it to insult them as "ignorant racists" and no matter how you want to dress that up it's still offensive.

And please, if you'd rather take your little shots at me than try to have a civil discussion about it then there's no sense going on.


When did I say redneck was not offensive? I said, on three different occasion that yes it is offensive, but to a much smaller number of people say when the N word is used.

Apples and oranges.

I went through why 3 times.

The amount of people offended is exponentially larger.

Yes does redneck offend some, YES. But to put these in the same sentence of how many it offends, or to not see the difference is where we will never see eye to eye.

#54 concert andy

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:08 PM

what in the world is the point of this discussion, anyway?

are you trying to prove that you're an educated racist, or something?


I somehow see Joker as saying red neck and N word are the same?

I say they are worlds apart in the definition and effect on people.

To me it seems joker wants us to know red neck is offensive.

#55 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:12 PM

How come african americans call each other derogatory names and it seems to be a sign of friendship and respect. Then if someone outside of their circle says such a thing, it is deemed offensive? Are they racist?

#56 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:12 PM

I somehow see Joker as saying red neck and N word are the same?

I say they are worlds apart in the definition and effect on people.

To me it seems joker wants us to know red neck is offensive.


I wonder if Joke can name one word in the world that isn't offensive to somebody... it's just another stupid and useless diversion.

#57 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:13 PM

How come african americans call each other derogatory names and it seems to be a sign of friendship and respect. Then if someone outside of their circle says such a thing, it is deemed offensive? Are they racist?


why don't you write a letter to the NAACP instead of trolling here?

better yet, email them and then get back to us.

I thought you were going to be more productive from election day on.

#58 deadheadskier

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:15 PM

When did I say redneck was not offensive? I said, on three different occasion that yes it is offensive, but to a much smaller number of people say when the N word is used.

Apples and oranges.

I went through why 3 times.

The amount of people offended is exponentially larger.

Yes does redneck offend some, YES. But to put these in the same sentence of how many it offends, or to not see the difference is where we will never see eye to eye.


the difference? you mean like rednecks always being able to vote, never being slaves, being able to ride at the front of the bus, etc.?

As offensive as the term "Redneck" is to some, it's definitely not in the same order as the N-word. Hell, most people won't even say the N-word anymore. They say the N-word when talking about it.

maybe we'll have to start saying the R-word too.

:rolling:

though Retard might already have dibs on R-word :dunno:

#59 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:16 PM

I guess no one can answer the question.

#60 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:17 PM

google it, r-word

#61 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:21 PM

the difference? you mean like rednecks always being able to vote, never being slaves, being able to ride at the front of the bus, etc.?

As offensive as the term "Redneck" is to some, it's definitely not in the same order as the N-word. Hell, most people won't even say the N-word anymore. They say the N-word when talking about it.

maybe we'll have to start saying the R-word too.

:rolling:

though Retard might already have dibs on R-word :dunno:


Oh! I get it now. Are history began just a short few hundred years ago. it all makes sense now.

#62 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:23 PM

are who?

#63 deadheadskier

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:24 PM

are you saying Robinhood was a Redneck?

I had no idea

#64 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:24 PM

what our you saying?

#65 Joker

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:25 PM

I somehow see Joker as saying red neck and N word are the same?

I say they are worlds apart in the definition and effect on people.

To me it seems joker wants us to know red neck is offensive.

I was just pointing out that it too is a hateful slur. Some here don't seem to think it is.

#66 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:27 PM

wow, thanks for pointing out for us that some days the sky has a tinge of pink... so helpful you our.

btw, is english your second language TASB?

#67 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:31 PM

White, poor, uneducated folks were never slaves and were always allowed to vote. Who knew!?

#68 concert andy

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:38 PM

How come african americans call each other derogatory names and it seems to be a sign of friendship and respect. Then if someone outside of their circle says such a thing, it is deemed offensive? Are they racist?


I think:

They decided to make the word their's. to take away the sting between each other and let it be a respect thing, and then to not let other people use the word, because it has ties to slavery, and the word is a reminder of that fact.

At least I tried to answer this.

#69 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:43 PM

I think:

They decided to make the word their's. to take away the sting between each other and let it be a respect thing, and then to not let other people use the word, because it has ties to slavery, and the word is a reminder of that fact.

At least I tried to answer this.


I can't really say, not having had the experience myself. I can only guess... but here's my guess: I think you're right... the same way Republicans tried to make the name "Obamacare" a stigma. Obama didn't allow it to become a negative. Instead, he embraced the term and turned it into a positive before they had the chance.

In other words, it's a defense mechanism. You really have to have a heart of stone to not see this.

#70 concert andy

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 05:56 PM

White, poor, uneducated MALES were never slaves and were always allowed to vote. Who knew!?


Fixed that for you.

Females were poor and uneducated too, and only allowed to vote starting in the early 20th century.

#71 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:01 PM

Except I was being sarcastic. If you actually think that white immigrants weren't slaves, and were entitled to vote, etc, you need to brush up on history.

#72 Joker

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:12 PM

The Irish Slave Trade – The Forgotten “White” Slaves

The Slaves That Time Forgot



They came as slaves; vast human cargo transported on tall British ships bound for the Americas. They were shipped by the hundreds of thousands and included men, women, and even the youngest of children.

Whenever they rebelled or even disobeyed an order, they were punished in the harshest ways. Slave owners would hang their human property by their hands and set their hands or feet on fire as one form of punishment. They were burned alive and had their heads placed on pikes in the marketplace as a warning to other captives.

We don’t really need to go through all of the gory details, do we? We know all too well the atrocities of the African slave trade.

But, are we talking about African slavery? King James II and Charles I also led a continued effort to enslave the Irish. Britain’s famed Oliver Cromwell furthered this practice of dehumanizing one’s next door neighbor.

The Irish slave trade began when James II sold 30,000 Irish prisoners as slaves to the New World. His Proclamation of 1625 required Irish political prisoners be sent overseas and sold to English settlers in the West Indies. By the mid 1600s, the Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat. At that time, 70% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves.

Ireland quickly became the biggest source of human livestock for English merchants. The majority of the early slaves to the New World were actually white.

From 1641 to 1652, over 500,000 Irish were killed by the English and another 300,000 were sold as slaves. Ireland’s population fell from about 1,500,000 to 600,000 in one single decade. Families were ripped apart as the British did not allow Irish dads to take their wives and children with them across the Atlantic. This led to a helpless population of homeless women and children. Britain’s solution was to auction them off as well.

During the 1650s, over 100,000 Irish children between the ages of 10 and 14 were taken from their parents and sold as slaves in the West Indies, Virginia and New England. In this decade, 52,000 Irish (mostly women and children) were sold to Barbados and Virginia. Another 30,000 Irish men and women were also transported and sold to the highest bidder. In 1656, Cromwell ordered that 2000 Irish children be taken to Jamaica and sold as slaves to English settlers.

Many people today will avoid calling the Irish slaves what they truly were: Slaves. They’ll come up with terms like “Indentured Servants” to describe what occurred to the Irish. However, in most cases from the 17th and 18th centuries, Irish slaves were nothing more than human cattle.

As an example, the African slave trade was just beginning during this same period. It is well recorded that African slaves, not tainted with the stain of the hated Catholic theology and more expensive to purchase, were often treated far better than their Irish counterparts.

African slaves were very expensive during the late 1600s (50 Sterling). Irish slaves came cheap (no more than 5 Sterling). If a planter whipped or branded or beat an Irish slave to death, it was never a crime. A death was a monetary setback, but far cheaper than killing a more expensive African. The English masters quickly began breeding the Irish women for both their own personal pleasure and for greater profit. Children of slaves were themselves slaves, which increased the size of the master’s free workforce. Even if an Irish woman somehow obtained her freedom, her kids would remain slaves of her master. Thus, Irish moms, even with this new found emancipation, would seldom abandon their kids and would remain in servitude.

In time, the English thought of a better way to use these women (in many cases, girls as young as 12) to increase their market share: The settlers began to breed Irish women and girls with African men to produce slaves with a distinct complexion. These new “mulatto” slaves brought a higher price than Irish livestock and, likewise, enabled the settlers to save money rather than purchase new African slaves. This practice of interbreeding Irish females with African men went on for several decades and was so widespread that, in 1681, legislation was passed “forbidding the practice of mating Irish slave women to African slave men for the purpose of producing slaves for sale.” In short, it was stopped only because it interfered with the profits of a large slave transport company.

England continued to ship tens of thousands of Irish slaves for more than a century. Records state that, after the 1798 Irish Rebellion, thousands of Irish slaves were sold to both America and Australia. There were horrible abuses of both African and Irish captives. One British ship even dumped 1,302 slaves into the Atlantic Ocean so that the crew would have plenty of food to eat.

There is little question that the Irish experienced the horrors of slavery as much (if not more in the 17th Century) as the Africans did. There is, also, very little question that those brown, tanned faces you witness in your travels to the West Indies are very likely a combination of African and Irish ancestry. In 1839, Britain finally decided on it’s own to end it’s participation in Satan’s highway to hell and stopped transporting slaves. While their decision did not stop pirates from doing what they desired, the new law slowly concluded THIS chapter of nightmarish Irish misery.

But, if anyone, black or white, believes that slavery was only an African experience, then they’ve got it completely wrong.

Irish slavery is a subject worth remembering, not erasing from our memories.

But, where are our public (and PRIVATE) schools???? Where are the history books? Why is it so seldom discussed?

Do the memories of hundreds of thousands of Irish victims merit more than a mention from an unknown writer?

Or is their story to be one that their English pirates intended: To (unlike the African book) have the Irish story utterly and completely disappear as if it never happened.

None of the Irish victims ever made it back to their homeland to describe their ordeal. These are the lost slaves; the ones that time and biased history books conveniently forgot.

http://www.globalres...te-slaves/31076

#73 concert andy

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:21 PM

Except I was being sarcastic. If you actually think that white immigrants weren't slaves, and were entitled to vote, etc, you need to brush up on history.


Except, dont ask in a form of a question, sarcasm is not easy to detect here. You know, context.

#74 hoagie

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:29 PM

I was just pointing out that it too is a hateful slur. Some here don't seem to think it is.


I disagree. I think you are either being overly sensitive, or insanely politically correct to stand firm on this issue.


#75 MeOmYo

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:33 PM

If you don't think redneck is disrespectful, go to where there a lot of them and start calling them rednecks. See how that works out for you. Also, rednecks will call themselves and each other rednecks the same as those that use the R-word. Doesn't mean it can't be used to disrespect.

#76 Joker

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:35 PM

I disagree. I think you are either being overly sensitive, or insanely politically correct to stand firm on this issue.

You can disagree if you like but, as you can see by the links I provided, it's not just my opinion.

#77 deadheadskier

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:37 PM

If you don't think redneck is disrespectful, go to where there a lot of them and start calling them rednecks. See how that works out for you. Also, rednecks will call themselves and each other rednecks the same as those that use the R-word. Doesn't mean it can't be used to disrespect.


Retards call other retards the R-word???

:lol:

#78 MeOmYo

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:37 PM

oops. N-word :lol:

#79 Joker

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:38 PM

I thought the R-word was Republican :huh:

#80 hoagie

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:43 PM

Calling someone a redneck, nigger, monkey, spook, cracker, honky, spic, or whatever says much more about the person saying it than the person it is directed at.

Sticks and stones may break one's bones, but being hurt by words is juvenile and one needs to rise above that sOrt of thing.

If you find yourself having hurt feelings over being called names, stop listening. Or taking immature peoples' opinions of you to heart.

#81 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:45 PM

redneck slavery... everyone remembers that, right?

No?

Why? Cuz it didn't happen.

#82 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:45 PM

The Irish Slave Trade – The Forgotten “White” Slaves

The Slaves That Time Forgot



They came as slaves; vast human cargo transported on tall British ships bound for the Americas. They were shipped by the hundreds of thousands and included men, women, and even the youngest of children.

Whenever they rebelled or even disobeyed an order, they were punished in the harshest ways. Slave owners would hang their human property by their hands and set their hands or feet on fire as one form of punishment. They were burned alive and had their heads placed on pikes in the marketplace as a warning to other captives.

We don’t really need to go through all of the gory details, do we? We know all too well the atrocities of the African slave trade.

But, are we talking about African slavery? King James II and Charles I also led a continued effort to enslave the Irish. Britain’s famed Oliver Cromwell furthered this practice of dehumanizing one’s next door neighbor.

The Irish slave trade began when James II sold 30,000 Irish prisoners as slaves to the New World. His Proclamation of 1625 required Irish political prisoners be sent overseas and sold to English settlers in the West Indies. By the mid 1600s, the Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat. At that time, 70% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves.

Ireland quickly became the biggest source of human livestock for English merchants. The majority of the early slaves to the New World were actually white.

From 1641 to 1652, over 500,000 Irish were killed by the English and another 300,000 were sold as slaves. Ireland’s population fell from about 1,500,000 to 600,000 in one single decade. Families were ripped apart as the British did not allow Irish dads to take their wives and children with them across the Atlantic. This led to a helpless population of homeless women and children. Britain’s solution was to auction them off as well.

During the 1650s, over 100,000 Irish children between the ages of 10 and 14 were taken from their parents and sold as slaves in the West Indies, Virginia and New England. In this decade, 52,000 Irish (mostly women and children) were sold to Barbados and Virginia. Another 30,000 Irish men and women were also transported and sold to the highest bidder. In 1656, Cromwell ordered that 2000 Irish children be taken to Jamaica and sold as slaves to English settlers.

Many people today will avoid calling the Irish slaves what they truly were: Slaves. They’ll come up with terms like “Indentured Servants” to describe what occurred to the Irish. However, in most cases from the 17th and 18th centuries, Irish slaves were nothing more than human cattle.

As an example, the African slave trade was just beginning during this same period. It is well recorded that African slaves, not tainted with the stain of the hated Catholic theology and more expensive to purchase, were often treated far better than their Irish counterparts.

African slaves were very expensive during the late 1600s (50 Sterling). Irish slaves came cheap (no more than 5 Sterling). If a planter whipped or branded or beat an Irish slave to death, it was never a crime. A death was a monetary setback, but far cheaper than killing a more expensive African. The English masters quickly began breeding the Irish women for both their own personal pleasure and for greater profit. Children of slaves were themselves slaves, which increased the size of the master’s free workforce. Even if an Irish woman somehow obtained her freedom, her kids would remain slaves of her master. Thus, Irish moms, even with this new found emancipation, would seldom abandon their kids and would remain in servitude.

In time, the English thought of a better way to use these women (in many cases, girls as young as 12) to increase their market share: The settlers began to breed Irish women and girls with African men to produce slaves with a distinct complexion. These new “mulatto” slaves brought a higher price than Irish livestock and, likewise, enabled the settlers to save money rather than purchase new African slaves. This practice of interbreeding Irish females with African men went on for several decades and was so widespread that, in 1681, legislation was passed “forbidding the practice of mating Irish slave women to African slave men for the purpose of producing slaves for sale.” In short, it was stopped only because it interfered with the profits of a large slave transport company.

England continued to ship tens of thousands of Irish slaves for more than a century. Records state that, after the 1798 Irish Rebellion, thousands of Irish slaves were sold to both America and Australia. There were horrible abuses of both African and Irish captives. One British ship even dumped 1,302 slaves into the Atlantic Ocean so that the crew would have plenty of food to eat.

There is little question that the Irish experienced the horrors of slavery as much (if not more in the 17th Century) as the Africans did. There is, also, very little question that those brown, tanned faces you witness in your travels to the West Indies are very likely a combination of African and Irish ancestry. In 1839, Britain finally decided on it’s own to end it’s participation in Satan’s highway to hell and stopped transporting slaves. While their decision did not stop pirates from doing what they desired, the new law slowly concluded THIS chapter of nightmarish Irish misery.

But, if anyone, black or white, believes that slavery was only an African experience, then they’ve got it completely wrong.

Irish slavery is a subject worth remembering, not erasing from our memories.

But, where are our public (and PRIVATE) schools???? Where are the history books? Why is it so seldom discussed?

Do the memories of hundreds of thousands of Irish victims merit more than a mention from an unknown writer?

Or is their story to be one that their English pirates intended: To (unlike the African book) have the Irish story utterly and completely disappear as if it never happened.

None of the Irish victims ever made it back to their homeland to describe their ordeal. These are the lost slaves; the ones that time and biased history books conveniently forgot.

http://www.globalres...te-slaves/31076


Plus, many of the first "settlers" in North America were indentured servants and slaves. They were "white" and ranged in creed.

#83 MeOmYo

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:46 PM

Calling someone a redneck, nigger, monkey, spook, cracker, honky, spic, or whatever says much more about the person saying it than the person it is directed at.

Sticks and stones may break one's bones, but being hurt by words is juvenile and one needs to rise above that sOrt of thing.

If you find yourself having hurt feelings over being called names, stop listening. Or taking immature peoples' opinions of you to heart.


that is one way to look at it. other's may look at it as an opportunity to teach someone respect.

#84 hoagie

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:49 PM

That's someone else's responsibility, not mine. I was raised properly.

#85 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:50 PM

so what did we learn today? that slave-owners are people and have feelings, too?

#86 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:51 PM

I think part of the problem is that some people think it's their job to teach others how to respect in the way they deem appropriate.

#87 hoagie

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:52 PM

that is one way to look at it. other's may look at it as an opportunity to teach someone respect.


If you mean an excuse to kick someones ass, you become just as ignorant and immature as the person who slur'd first.

People who slur are ignorant. People who are offended by slurs are immature. Its that simple.

#88 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:55 PM

Thanks, Hoag. it's all clear now.

#89 Java Time

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:02 PM

Calling someone a redneck, nigger, monkey, spook, cracker, honky, spic, or whatever says much more about the person saying it than the person it is directed at.

Sticks and stones may break one's bones, but being hurt by words is juvenile and one needs to rise above that sOrt of thing.

If you find yourself having hurt feelings over being called names, stop listening. Or taking immature peoples' opinions of you to heart.


I call folks rednecks when they are...i.e. my cousins in FLA swamps that drink beer and poach gators for fun.

I call my white friends from time to time the N-word but that's only amongst us and in no way is used negatively and when I am trying to be cooler than my old white boy self really is.

I

#90 MeOmYo

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:05 PM

If you mean an excuse to kick someones ass, you become just as ignorant and immature as the person who slur'd first.

People who slur are ignorant. People who are offended by slurs are immature. Its that simple.


everyone reacts differently and I don't know anyone that goes out seeking an "excuse" to kick anyone's ass.

Sorry to hear that you prefer to let the ignorance continue.

#91 Java Time

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:05 PM

Calling someone a redneck, nigger, monkey, spook, cracker, honky, spic, or whatever says much more about the person saying it than the person it is directed at.

Sticks and stones may break one's bones, but being hurt by words is juvenile and one needs to rise above that sOrt of thing.

If you find yourself having hurt feelings over being called names, stop listening. Or taking immature peoples' opinions of you to heart.


that's something in line of what my psychology teacher once said..."it's just a word...you wouldn't get angry if someone called you a chair...right?" So I said I guess you're right...so you won't mind me taking your cunt-whore wife out for drinks this evening..right?

:funny1:

#92 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:07 PM

oh... so "teach someone respect" is code for kicking their ass? I thought so, but didn't want to accuse anyone of unnecessary violence.

You teach your kids your version of respect, and it's not your business to "teach" anyone else.

#93 MeOmYo

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:09 PM

and to simplify it down to, "it's just a word" is ignorant. It is not the words that are offensive, it's the persons character.

#94 hoagie

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:14 PM

and to simplify it down to, "it's just a word" is ignorant. It is not the words that are offensive, it's the persons character.


But really, they are just words. Getting bent out of shape by the words (or thoughts) others say about you is a sign you put to much importance on what others think of you.

#95 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:15 PM

You can call it a ham sandwich too.

#96 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:18 PM

doesn't everyone have a right to their own character without fear of offending someone?

wow... sounds like a bunch of high-school girls talking about what someone said about them. Grow up. Violence is not the answer.

#97 MeOmYo

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:21 PM

But really, they are just words. Getting bent out of shape by the words (or thoughts) others say about you is a sign you put to much importance on what others think of you.


says who? You?

if someone offends me, I am going to make it clear that it is not acceptable and to stop. That is all.

#98 PeaceFrog

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:28 PM

I think it's offensive that you think you have a better understanding of what it means to respect others.

It's crazy that you're so gung ho about owning guns, but you think that freedom of speech should be limited to what you consider respectful speech. priorities...

#99 hoagie

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:32 PM

says who? You?

if someone offends me, I am going to make it clear that it is not acceptable and to stop. That is all.


Thats cool, but understand that youd only possibly escalate the tension, than educate anyone.

#100 TakeAStepBack

TakeAStepBack
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Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:33 PM

And this concludes Deep Thoughts with Hoagie.