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USA's Liberation of Libya has begun.


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#251 Deadshow Dan

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:43 PM

The real story here: Jack :heart:s Dan. :devil:

Don't worry, not tempted, I'll stay true to ya Julius :heart:

#252 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 08:05 PM

[quote name='beerzrkr']

#253 beerzrkr

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 08:13 PM

History. Every time Sadam pulled something, kim jong il followed. Specially this time of year when their food supply is running out from winter.

#254 Deadshow Dan

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 09:32 PM

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#255 jg

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 11:18 PM

[quote name='beerzrkr']

#256 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 01:01 PM

http://www.mathaba.net/news/?x=626278

Proof we are winning: MoD release footage of airstrikes wiping out Gaddafi's guns as coalition planes 'fly free over Libya'
By DAVID WILLIAMS, TIM SHIPMAN and DAILY MAIL REPORTER


............ibya forces returned fire using anti-aircraft weapons but where unable to stop the raids.
The Ministry of Defence also confirmed that they had attacked armoured vehicles in the town of Ajdabiya around 430miles south of the capital.

Defence Secretary Dr Liam Fox said: 'British Tornado GR4 Aircraft, on armed reconnaissance missions over Libya, last night took part in a co-ordinated missile strike against units of Colonel Gaddafi's Libyan Military in support of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1973.
'The Tornado aircraft launched a number of guided Brimstone missiles at Libyan armoured vehicles which were threatening the civilian population of Ajdabiya. Brimstone is a high precision, low collateral damage weapon optimised against demanding and mobile targets.'
French aircraft were also involved in the attacks with the French Army's chief of staff, Admiral Edouard Guillaud, saying his forces had destroyed an artillery battery.
Admiral Guillaud also declared that Libyan airspace was 'under control' following NATO's takeover of the no-fly zone.
'Libyan airspace is under control, and we proved it yesterday, because a Libyan plane in the hands of pro-Gaddafi forces, which had just taken off from Misrata in order to bomb Misrata, was destroyed by a French Rafale,' Guillaud said on a French radio broadcast.
The bombing of the country came as it was revealed that hundreds of British special forces troops have been deployed deep inside Libya targeting Colonel Gaddafi’s forces – and more are on standby.
While Chancellor George Osborne repeated that UK ground troops would not be involved, the Daily Mail can reveal there are an estimated 350 already mounting covert operations.
In total it is understood that just under 250 UK special forces soldiers and their support have been in Libya since before the launch of air strikes to enforce the no-fly zone against Gaddafi’s forces.
The troops in Libya were drawn from a squadron of SAS and SBS personnel, some who have been in the country for a month and are being re-supplied with water, food and ammunition via airdrops from Cyprus.
Those numbers were further boosted by nearly 100 this week when paratroopers from the Special Forces Support Group (SFSG) were sent to Libya as coalition commanders prepare to increase the tempo of operations.
A further 800 Royal Marines are on five days’ notice to deploy to the Mediterranean to support humanitarian relief and aid operations.......

Read the entire article above.


This is just a reminder that we were already in there before this kicked off. Furthermore, if the MoD has covert spec ops troops deployed, you can bet your sweet ass the USA does too....

#257 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 01:07 PM

http://cnn.com/video...bya.us.role.cnn

#258 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 01:18 PM

33 revolutions of the sun......

#259 beerzrkr

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 02:20 PM

We still have over 28,000 troops stationed in South Korea, not looking any other way.


um, yeah. ???

#260 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 12:58 PM

http://www.thenewame...-qaeda-in-libya

UN, Obama Fighting Alongside Al-Qaeda in Libya

The Obama administration’s UN-backed military intervention against Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi is aiding al-Qaeda, which, according to media reports citing high-level commanders in the terror group and Libyan rebel leaders, is deeply tied to the revolution. When the dust settles, the anti-American Islamic extremists could easily emerge as the new rulers of that nation, or at least a part of it. And al-Qaeda is already reportedly grabbing up advanced military weaponry there.

Ironically, perhaps, Gadhafi has been claiming for weeks that al-Qaeda and drug use were responsible for the uprisings. "Bin Laden ... this is the enemy who is manipulating people," he told state television in late February. "Do not be swayed by bin Laden."

Most observers assumed the allegations were deliberate lies or the delusions of a madman trying to keep the reins of power. But it turns out that the claims of al-Qaeda involvement were at least partially correct.

The man identified in news reports as the leader of Libya’s rebellion, Abdel-Hakim al-Hasidi, actually battled U.S. and coalition forces during the invasion of Afghanistan a decade ago. He was captured in 2002, handed over to U.S. authorities, and eventually released in Libya in 2008. Now, al-Hasidi, with U.S. and international air support, is supposedly leading the anti-Gadhafi revolution.

A Reuters report citing Qatar-based Gulf News said earlier this month — before Western intervention became official — that senior al-Qaeda commander Abu Yahya al-Libi released a videotaped message urging rebels in Libya to continue the battle. He also warned that failure to topple the Gadhafi regime would be unacceptable.

“The Libyan people have suffered at the hands of Kaddafi for more than 40 years.... He used the Libyans as a testing ground for his violent, rambling and disgusting thoughts,” the alleged terrorist leader said in the video. "Retreating will mean decades of harsher oppression and greater injustices than what you have endured.”

The al-Qaeda leader also blasted the U.S. government and other Western regimes — now fighting the same battle he praised — for propping up dictatorships in the region. By press time, Gulf News was not able to independently verify the authenticity of the video posted on Jihadist websites.

More recently, Libyan rebel leader al-Hasidi, who fought U.S. troops in Afghanistan, offered another startling revelation. He admitted in an interview with an Italian newspaper that Islamic warriors from Libya, whom he had recruited to battle Western forces in Iraq, are now actually fighting alongside U.S. and international forces to help topple Kaddafi.

Read the entire article above.

#261 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 03:37 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2...7/yemen.unrest/

(CNN) -- Fighting between Yemeni security forces and members of al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula has left people on both sides dead over the past two days, Yemeni security forces said.
The reports came as President Ali Abdullah Saleh has been fighting to hold onto power, arguing that he is best equipped to lead the fight against Islamists.
Three "al Qaeda terrorists were killed" and six others were arrested in Lawdardistrict, Yemen's official news agency Saba reported Saturday.
On Sunday, seven Yemeni soldiers were killed and seven others were wounded when members of al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula attacked them in Mareb, two security officials said. The attack took place at a military checkpoint a mile north of the government complex in Mareb province.
The attackers also used grenades and machine guns, and took two military vehicles from the checkpoint, the security forces said.
After the fighting Saturday, the Yemeni government said it was a sign that strong measures are needed to combat instability within the country. Saba reported that Governor Saleh al-Zawari of Abyan province affirmed "the importance to enhance security performance to strictly confront any attempts to disturb security and stability in the governorate."
Yemen has been facing protests from people citing government corruption, a lack of political freedom and high unemployment.
Calls for Saleh's ouster have increased in recent weeks following revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia. Saleh has ruled since 1978.
Saleh told an Arab television network Saturday that he is "ready to step down with respect and dignity, even within a two hours' notice."
Speaking to Al Arabiya, he also warned that some leadership factions in the opposition have a "foreign agenda."
"The people are afraid of the Islamists," he said, cautioning against the influence of groups like al Qaeda. "The Arab world, including the Yemeni people, are terrified of the possibility that the Islamists will take control."
He described himself as a "constitutional president" and the country as "a ticking bomb."
"Everyone needs to look at Somalia and learn," he added, describing his country's tribal roots and the need for compromise.
Opposition leaders rejected the president's latest comments. "Saleh has not learned a lesson from the millions who are demanding he step down," said Yaseen Noman, president of the JMP, the country's largest opposition bloc. "All the different initiatives and negotiations that take place are only there for Saleh to buy himself more time," he said.
"Saleh's lies show the world that he must leave power -- and people understand this," Noman added. "Our demands are simple: He must leave office. This is not open for negotiation."
Hamid Al-Ahmar of the opposition Islah Party said Sunday, "I frequently tell the youth and JMP that any negotiations with Saleh is a waste of time. He is like a snake, he never stays in the same spot."
Al-Ahmar said Saleh, during discussions between the government and opposition parties, temporarily agreed to transfer his powers to the vice president but then changed his mind. "This is usual from Saleh, and his words and promises have no value to us," Al-Ahmar said.
An official report on the meeting, in a Saba article, said nothing about an offer of transferring power to the vice president.
"The president rejected the demands of the JMP for the departure of the regime and the handover of the power to the opposition," the article read. It then quoted Saley as saying, "We do not have a problem to meet their demands for the departure of the regime ... but for whom? and how?"
Saleh's TV interview Saturday came one day after after he spoke to thousands at a pro-government demonstration in an effort to underscore his intentions to foster dialogue with anti-government protesters and make concessions to avoid bloodshed.
The embattled president said he would welcome either European mediators or those from the Gulf Cooperation Council to be impartial observers in the talks.
The country has been wracked by a Shiite Muslim uprising, a U.S.-aided crackdown on al Qaeda operatives and a looming shortage of water.
U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates was asked last week about how the United States sees cooperation with Yemen if Saleh were to step down.
"We have had a good working relationship with President Saleh," Gates told reporters during a trip to Cairo. "He's been an important ally in the counterterrorism arena. But clearly, there's a lot of unhappiness inside Yemen. And I think we will basically just continue to watch the situation. We haven't done any post-Saleh planning, if you will."
Saleh has said he accepts opposition demands for constitutional reforms and holding parliamentary elections by the end of the year.
He said in a written statement that he was "committed to undertaking all possible initiatives to reach a settlement" with the JMP bloc and "prevent any future bloodshed of the Yemeni people."
Saleh has also promised not to run for president in the next round of elections.
The president's standing weakened after some government officials and military officers declared their support for the opposition in the wake of a crackdown on protesters that left 52 people dead.
During Saturday's interview, Saleh said clashes had resulted in 41 deaths.
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has called for full political dialogue in Yemen involving all players to find a peaceful solution.
Saleh, who has been in power for 32 years, has been a staunch U.S. ally in the fight against al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.
Last week, Yemen's parliament approved a 30-day extension of emergency powers Saleh declared in response to protests.
The emergency law expands the government's powers of arrest, detention and censorship.

#262 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 03:39 PM

It appears that govt. is ready to show the people of the US about their close ties with Al-Qaeda.

Anyone want to take a crack at what those ties are? :coffee:

#263 capt_morgan

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 03:40 PM

bow ties?

#264 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 03:52 PM

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#265 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 03:55 PM

sio, how well are these psy-ops working on you? :lol:

This situation is so blatant.....

#266 Arglebargle

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:05 PM

Posted Image

#267 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:09 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2...ibya/index.html

Washington (CNN) -- Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi is placing bodies of people his regime has killed at the sites of some missile strikes by the U.S.-led coalition, according to intelligence reports cited by U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates.
In an interview to be broadcast Sunday on the CBS program "Face the Nation," Gates said he was unaware of coalition attacks causing civilian casualties.
"The truth of the matter is we have trouble coming up with proof of any civilian casualties that we have been responsible for," Gates said in the interview conducted Saturday. "But we do have a lot of intelligence reporting about Gadhafi taking the bodies of the people he's killed and putting them at the sites where we've attacked."
Asked how often it has happened, Gates replied: "We have a number of reports of that."
An excerpt of the interview was posted on the CBS News website.
A senior defense official told CNN on Sunday that the U.S. military has information gleaned from intelligence sources that Gadhafi has tasked his aides to search morgues and hospitals for dead bodies to be posed as civilian casualties.
NATO military planners are drafting rules of engagement for coalition forces to follow once the alliance takes over the Libyan mission. A key question is how robust the NATO-led forces will be in attacking Libyan ground forces to protect civilians.
Rebels capture cities in Libya Woman alleges Libyan forces raped her NATO's role in Libya unclear Gadhafi has claimed that coalition missile attacks have killed civilians, and some NATO members and Arab nations responded with concern that the Libyan military mission might exceed the intent of the U.N. Security Council resolution that authorized it.
In the CBS interview, Gates and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said the military mission was proceeding well so far. Asked if there was a problem between the military mission's limited goal of civilian protection and President Barack Obama's stated policy objective of ousting Gadhafi, both said no.
"You don't, in a military campaign, set as a mission or a goal something you are not sure you can achieve," Gates said. "And as we've learned over the past number of years, regime change is very complicated and can be very expensive and can take a long time. So I think the key here was establishing a military mission that was achievable, was achievable in a limited period of time and could be sustained."
Clinton noted how former Serbian Slobodan Milosevic remained in power despite mounting internal and external pressure for his ouster that ended with Milosevic dying while on trial in the international war crimes court. She likened that situation to Gadhafi today.
"It took a while for Milosevic to leave, but you could see his days were numbered even though he wasn't yet out of office," Clinton said.
Gates joked he "wouldn't be hanging any new pictures" if he were Gadhafi, then noted that there are several possible scenarios for the Libyan leader's ouster.
"His military can turn, we could see elements of his military turning, deciding this is a no-win proposition, the families splitting, I mean any number of possibilities are out there, particularly as long as the international pressure continues, and those around him see no future in staying with him," Gates said.

#268 capt_morgan

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:11 PM

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:funny1:

#269 seany

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:12 PM

sio, how well are these psy-ops working on you? :lol:

This situation is so blatant.....


Blatant how? What's your take?

#270 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:20 PM

Posted Image


This makes no sense to me....

#271 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:31 PM

If I'm understanding this correctly, We said up a no-fly zone (by military action Obama initiated, completely sidelining congress in the matter) over Libya by bombing Gaddafi's military forces back to the stone age. Which killed no civilians we can confirm, yet we have "several" reports that Gaddafi's men are staging dead bodies in bomb zones. Gaddafi is saying that the rebel force is an Al-Qaeda led invasion, which the rebel leader confirms Al-Qaeda ties, which means that we are supporting Ali-Q by supporting the rebels. No American mainstream media report on this of course. Shall I go on?

All of this can be found from the articles I've posted here...

#272 seany

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:36 PM

Sure, but what's your ultimate hypothesis? That this is blatantly for oil? Or for something else?

#273 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:44 PM

I'm not sure yet....this isnt just oil...

What is blatant here are the psy-ops and the fact that the US has ties with Al-Qaeda. Which Ive known for years, but this makes it pretty obvious.

#274 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 05:17 PM

http://www.guardian....uk.davidshayler

A link regarding AL-Qaeda in Libya dated 2002. :coffee:

#275 seany

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 05:31 PM

It doesn't surprise me that they are there. There's been a long history of militant training camps in Libya. I still doubt they were behind the initial uprisings, but it, again, wouldn't surprise me if they've decided to get into the game once violence broke out.

#276 Joker

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 05:41 PM

Don't worry, things will be different once Bush is gone

#277 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:00 PM

It doesn't surprise me that they are there. There's been a long history of militant training camps in Libya. I still doubt they were behind the initial uprisings, but it, again, wouldn't surprise me if they've decided to get into the game once violence broke out.


Really? What about the comments from the rebel leader?
Bahrain, Syria, Yemen and Chad all are facing the same protesting and the news is calling it Al-Qaeda led invasion. How can that be?

USA = Al-Qaeda. Believe me or dont, it makes no difference to me.
Bin Laden was a CIA Op., funded by US money and arms a LONG time ago.

This is all being handled from the inside out and as usual, the USA is the protagonist. It looks like we will hand this one over to our good buddies in Britain on the surface though..... :coffee:
The people here certainly dont want another war. That's why this is "kinetic military action". :lol:

#278 Jambear

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:03 PM

OSAMEA.

#279 seany

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:30 PM

Really? What about the comments from the rebel leader?
Bahrain, Syria, Yemen and Chad all are facing the same protesting and the news is calling it Al-Qaeda led invasion. How can that be?

USA = Al-Qaeda. Believe me or dont, it makes no difference to me.
Bin Laden was a CIA Op., funded by US money and arms a LONG time ago.

This is all being handled from the inside out and as usual, the USA is the protagonist. It looks like we will hand this one over to our good buddies in Britain on the surface though..... :coffee:
The people here certainly dont want another war. That's why this is "kinetic military action". :lol:


I'm not going to argue that the creation of Al Qaeda was a direct result of U.S. foreign policy stemming from our CIA funded efforts in Afghanistan - including Bin Laden. But to think that we have a hand in the control of Al Qaeda right now is a stretch. Does that mean that our black ops folks wouldn't stoop to paying militants, whatever their affiliation, for some action? I'm sure they would. But I think the extent of their involvement in Libya and their clout and power as an organization is largely over-rated at this juncture. That said, I think it would be foolish for us to send arms to the rebels over there, as we really have no idea who they are or what their aims will be if/when they gain control.

#280 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:41 PM

Funding terror to promote military action in a religiously fanatical geographic location where energy resources are abundant.... :coffee:

A long history of dictator puppetry implanting and then removing......

Hmmmmm......

#281 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 06:58 PM

I'm not going to argue that the creation of Al Qaeda was a direct result of U.S. foreign policy stemming from our CIA funded efforts in Afghanistan - including Bin Laden. But to think that we have a hand in the control of Al Qaeda right now is a stretch. Does that mean that our black ops folks wouldn't stoop to paying militants, whatever their affiliation, for some action? I'm sure they would. But I think the extent of their involvement in Libya and their clout and power as an organization is largely over-rated at this juncture. That said, I think it would be foolish for us to send arms to the rebels over there, as we really have no idea who they are or what their aims will be if/when they gain control.


Why would we interfere at all, after making this statement?
A statement I agree with btw...
The same shitty humanitarian crimes are taking place in other countries where we aren't getting involved. So the whole "save civilians" line is total bullshit.

#282 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 07:22 PM

http://www.telegraph...protesters.html

Syria protests: Evidence that government forces killed protesters

Ever since the first stirrings of unrest materialised more than a month ago, Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian president, has sought to disguise both the unprecedented challenge to his authority and his violent efforts to suppress it.
But even though Syria has effectively been sealed off from the outside world, Mr Assad, like so many of his fellow Arab dictators, has been unable to counter the power of technology.
Using nothing more than their mobile telephones, protesters braved live rounds to film the carnage unleashed on the southern city of Deraa for a second time on Friday.
Just two days before, reports from the city, which sits on Syria's border with Jordan, suggested that as many as 100 people had been shot dead by government security forces.
But its inhabitants refused to yield. One clip, shot on Friday, shows unarmed protesters gathering peacefully on a dusty city street when suddenly the calm is shattered by a barrage of machine gunfire so intense the individual rounds are indistinguishable for each other.

In panic, the protesters, children among them, seek whatever shelter they can find, darting behind walls and parked cars or ducking into shop doorways as the relentless cacophony continues.
Groups of men rush past, carrying the dead and the wounded. Blood drips onto the street. The camera hovers over the corpses of three men, lying in a puddle.
No-one knows exactly how many people were killed in the second massacre of Deraa, though some residents spoke of at least 25 fatalities, with hundreds more wounded.
There were deaths, too, in surrounding towns and villages whose people had attempted to march on the city to express their solidarity. A second video, shot in the town of Sanamayn, 40 miles north of Daraa, showed the bodies of seven men, some of them bearing horrific gunshot wounds, lain out across the floor of a building.
Residents in the town said at least 20 were killed on Friday.
Yet even after such a bloodbath, there was little evidence that Mr Assad had succeeded in preventing his country from following the trajectory of uprisings elsewhere in the Arab world that have seen equally hated leaders toppled or severely weakened.
Yesterday, thousands returned to the streets of Daraa, while in the nearby town of Tafas, angry crowds burned down the headquarters of the local Ba'ath party, which has ruled Syria since 1963, and set a police station alight.
The previous day, towns and cities across Syria that had either been quiet previously or had been successfully pacified, had also erupted in protest.
The demonstrations might have been smaller, but the response was equally brutish, with deaths reported in the city of Homs, President Assad's birthplace of Latakia and even in the capital Damascus itself.
Yet even as the president faced the prospect of a localised crisis turning into a countrywide revolt, his government insisted that nothing was amiss and resorted instead to the kind of propaganda perfected by Libya's leader, Moammar Gaddafi, in recent weeks.
Mr Assad's ministers claimed that the trouble was little more than a minor outbreak of violence, initiated by Islamist terrorists who had infiltrated the country from Jordan and concocted by the United States and its allies in al Qaeda.
"There is a totally peaceful climate in the Syrian towns and the terrorists have been arrested," Mohsen Bilal, the information minister, said.
State media went one step further, claiming that the rallies in Daraa had in fact been called to express their love of the president.
"Spontaneous popular rallies chanted national slogans highly lauding President Assad's generous decrees and decisions, pledging their loyalty to his excellency and their unity under his leadership in the face of the conspiracy against Syria," the SANA news agency reported.
It even purported to quote Sheikh Ahmed al-Sayasna, the imam of the al-Omari mosque where many protesters were killed on Wednesday, as saying that the "rallies were a message of love and gratitude by the citizens of Daraa to his excellency President Assad."
Yet Mr Sayasna told western reporters a different story, saying that at least 20 protesters were shot dead on Friday in an unprovoked attack by state forces.
The magnitude of the protests in Syria may not yet be on a sufficient scale to spell Mr Assad's imminent demise, but the momentum appears to be with the protesters.
One Israeli official who follows Syria yesterday said he believed the country had "reached a point of no return".
Many western governments will be hoping so in the belief that Mr Assad's overthrow would substantially weaken Iran, which has used its alliance with Syria to bolster its authority in the Middle East and has used the country as a conduit to supply weapons to Hizbollah and Hamas.
In the past few days, Syrian protesters have been heard chanting: "No to Iran! No to Hizbollah!" That Mr Assad is facing so stern a test is the result of one major misstep.
Even as other autocrats in the region were toppled, Syria had seemed insulated from the unrest plaguing the Middle East, its people too cowed to mount a serious challenge against one of the world's most repressive regimes.
In the back of many people's minds were the memories of what had happened to an earlier generation that had challenged the Assad dynasty. In 1982, the president's late father and predecessor, Hafez al-Assad, put down a revolt in the city of Hama by killing an estimated 20,000 people.
Two months ago, inspired by the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia, a group of online activists called for protests in Damascus. No-one turned up. A second attempt last month drew just dozens, who were easily dispersed by riot police.
But then, a week ago, the authorities sparked the fury of the people of Daraa by arresting a group of school boys who had scrawled an anti-government slogan on a wall.
And in outrage at the treatment of the people of Daraa, other parts of Syria rose up.
Mr Assad may not be finished yet. He may not be finished at all. Although he is a member of the Allawite sect of Shia Islam, a minority that constitutes just 12 per cent of a population dominated by Sunnis, he can count on the allegiance of the senior echelons of the army -- something the leaders of Egypt and Tunisia could not.
Like the president, the army's officer corps is overwhelmingly Allawite, and has too much to lose by allowing a revolution. The Sunni business elite also backs the president.
But crucially, one of the key props of the regime, fear of the Assad name, has been broken.
In Daraa, and even in other parts of the country, statues of Hafez al-Assad and billboards bearing his son's photographs have been torn down and set alight.
Even more potently, there have also been protests in Hama itself for the first time since the 1982 massacre.
"The fear barrier has been broken," said one Syrian activist, corresponding with The Sunday Telegraph by email. "We are not scared any more. There is nothing more they can do to us, and it is this knowledge that is our greatest weapon."

#283 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 07:29 PM

http://www.news.com....4#ixzz1Hffm5oRa

'Al-Qaeda snatched missiles' in Libya
AL-QAEDA'S offshoot in North Africa has snatched surface-to-air missiles from an arsenal in Libya during the civil strife there, Chad's President says.
Idriss Deby Itno did not say how many surface-to-air missiles were stolen, but told the African weekly Jeune Afrique that he was "100 per cent sure" of his assertion.

"The Islamists of al-Qaeda took advantage of the pillaging of arsenals in the rebel zone to acquire arms, including surface-to-air missiles, which were then smuggled into their sanctuaries in Tenere," a desert region of the Sahara that stretches from northeast Niger to western Chad, Deby said in the interview.

"This is very serious. AQIM is becoming a genuine army, the best equipped in the region," he said.

His claim was echoed by officials in other countries in the region who said that they were worried that al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) might have acquired "heavy weapons", thanks to the insurrection.

"We have sure information. We are very worried for the sub-region," a Malian security source who did not want to be named said.

AQIM originated as an armed Islamist resistance movement to the secular Algerian government.

It now operates mainly in Algeria, Mauritania, Mali and Niger, where it has attacked military targets and taken civilian hostages, particularly Europeans, some of whom it has killed.

"We have the same information," about heavy weapons, including SAM 7 missiles, a military source from Niger said.

"It is very worrying. This overarming is a real danger for the whole zone," he added

"AQIM gets the weapons in two ways; people go and look for the arms in Libya to deliver them to AQIM in the Sahel, or AQIM elements go there themselves."

Elsewhere in the interview, Chad's president backed the assertion by his neighbour and erstwhile enemy Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi that the protests in Libya have been driven in part by al-Qaeda.

"There is a partial truth in what he says," Deby said.

"Up to what point? I don't know. But I am certain that AQIM took an active part in the uprising."

After years of tension between the two nations, which were at war during part of the 1980s, Deby has more recently maintained good relations with Gaddafi.

The Chadian leader described the international military intervention in Libya, launched a week ago by the United States, France and Britain, as a "hasty decision".

"It could have heavy consequences for the stability of the region and the spread of terrorism in Europe, the Mediterranean and the rest of Africa," he cautioned.

Deby denied assertions that mercenaries had been recruited in Chad to fight for Gaddafi, though some of the several thousand Chad nationals in Libya may have joined the fight "on their own".

#284 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 07:51 PM


:lol:

#285 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 08:25 PM



and there it is......

#286 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 08:54 PM

The prosecution rests its case, your honor.

#287 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 01:22 PM

Obrahma's Erect Veggie to appear tonight at 7:30 to lie to the nation. Should be epcot.

#288 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 02:11 PM

Another thought to consider. There is another precious resource that Libya has in north Africa.......

Posted Image

#289 vic

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 02:30 PM

Another thought to consider. There is another precious resource that Libya has in north Africa.......

Posted Image


uh oh...have we really gotten to that point?:shocked:

#290 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 02:38 PM

When a small nation like Libya side steps the IMF and International bankster cartel, creating a large aqua project that helps the people of the country step forward out of oppression (yes, World banks use water to oppress people), there tends to be some strain diplomatically. Gaddafi built "the worlds largest" fossil water project to date and did so with his own money.

#291 Joker

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 02:42 PM

Cool, water. :cry1:

#292 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 03:37 PM

"Nobody cares, nobody seems to notice....." ~ G. Carlin

#293 vic

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 05:17 PM

http://www.globalres...xt=va&aid=23985

Depleted uranium: a strange way to protect Libyan civilians


by David Wilson

In the first 24 hours of the Libyan attack, US B-2s dropped forty-five 2,000-pound bombs. These massive bombs, along with the Cruise missiles launched from British and French planes and ships, all contained depleted uranium (DU) warheads.

DU is the waste product from the process of enriching uranium ore. It is used in nuclear weapons and reactors. Because it is a very heavy substance, 1.7 times denser than lead, it is highly valued by the military for its ability to punch through armored vehicles and buildings. When a weapon made with a DU tip strikes a solid object like the side of a tank, it goes straight through it, then erupts in a burning cloud of vapor. The vapor settles as dust, which is not only poisonous, but also radioactive.

An impacting DU missile burns at 10,000 degrees C. When it strikes a target, 30% fragments into shrapnel. The remaining 70% vaporises into three highly-toxic oxides, including uranium oxide. This black dust remains suspended in the air and, according to wind and weather, can travel over great distances. If you think Iraq and Libya are far away, remember that radiation from Chernobyl reached Wales.

Particles less than 5 microns in diameter are easily inhaled and may remain in the lungs or other organs for years. Internalized DU can cause kidney damage, cancers of the lung and bone, skin disorders, neurocognitive disorders, chromosome damage, immune deficiency syndromes and rare kidney and bowel diseases. Pregnant women exposed to DU may give birth to infants with genetic defects. Once the dust has vaporised, don't expect the problem to go away soon. As an alpha particle emitter, DU has a half life of 4.5 billion years.

In the 'shock and awe' attack on Iraq, more than 1,500 bombs and missiles were dropped on Baghdad alone. Seymour Hersh has claimed that the US Third Marine Aircraft Wing alone dropped more than "five hundred thousand tons of ordnance". All of it DU-tipped.

Al Jazeera reported that invading US forces fired two hundred tons of radioactive material into buildings, homes, streets and gardens of Baghdad. A reporter from the Christian Science Monitor took a Geiger counter to parts of the city that had been subjected to heavy shelling by US troops. He found radiation levels 1,000 to 1,900 times higher than normal in residential areas. With its population of 26 million, the US dropped a one-ton bomb for every 52 Iraqi citizens or 40 pounds of explosives per person.

William Hague has said that we are in Libya " to protect civilians and civilian-populated areas".You don't have to look far for who and what are being 'protected'.

In that first 24 hours the 'Allies' 'expended'

#294 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 05:29 PM

http://peoplesworld....-the-libya-war/

U.S. participation in the war in Libya appears to be coordinated out of a former French Foreign Legion base in Djibouti, a tiny country of a half million souls at the very tip of the Horn of Africa. This is the forward base of AFRICOM, the unified command for African action set up in 2007 by former President George W. Bush and his Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, who has continued in that post under President Barack Obama. Why the United States has set up such a special Africa operation, and what this portends, bears examination.

The original reason given for the creation of AFRICOM, with its main base not in Africa but in Stuttgart, Germany, was to coordinate anti-terrorism efforts in countries such as Somalia, where the collapse of organized government had led to a very unstable and dangerous situation. But although some African countries were happy to take military hardware from the United States, many of them, including especially South Africa, expressed qualms.

Other than the anti-terrorism motive, commentators have raised the issue of oil. Oil industry analysts predict that by the year 2015, the United States will be getting 25 percent of its imported oil from African sources. The biggest oil producers in Africa are Libya, with 47 billion barrels in proved reserves (and maybe lots more yet undiscovered), Nigeria (37.5 billion barrels), Angola (13.5 billion barrels), Algeria (13.4 billion barrels) and the Sudan (6.8 billion barrels). Smaller African countries, including Gabon and Equatorial Guinea, have large-scale oil production proportional to their size. Writing in 2008, Antonia Juhasz posits an oil politics motive for the creation of AFRICOM. "The concern is that, as it has in Iraq, a larger US military presence in Africa will strain the overburdened military while increasing internal hostilities, regional instability and anger at the United States," he said, adding, "The ultimate objective of the two efforts is the same: securing big oil's access to the region's oil."

Libya, Nigeria, Angola and Algeria are all member states of OPEC, the cartel of oil producing countries, whose joint actions in setting production quotas have a profound effect on the price of oil. Numerous U.S. oil companies are invested in the African oil-producing countries, including Libya. Even though leader Moammar Gadaffi's government nationalized a lot of foreign oil facilities when it took power from King Idris in 1969, some major foreign, including U.S., oil companies have investments in Libya, in joint operations with the Libyan state. These include Marathon, Hess, Conoco, Gulf, Occidental, BP, Repasol (Spain), Eni (Italy) and Total (France) among others.

In 2009, Gadaffi started suggesting that he might nationalize the remaining foreign oil assets in Libya (AFRICOM had already been set up by that time), and he has renewed that threat since the NATO intervention began last week. But right now sanctions imposed by the U.S. and the European Union have reduced Libya's oil exports to a trickle, resulting in a worldwide jump in fuel prices. A drastic intervention leading to the removal of Gadaffi and greater freedom of operation for these oil companies might well be part of the motive for the intervention, especially on the part of major European Union countries dependent on Libya for their energy needs.

Another reason given by some analysts for the creation of AFRICOM is as a counter to Chinese commercial advances in Africa. AFRICOM is mainly a military entity, but includes civil operations that are supposed to win the hearts and minds of Africans through development projects.

Carmel Davis, Chairman of Roger Holdings, Inc., raised this issue in a 2008 paper. To Davis, countering Chinese influence in Africa is good, because Chinese companies tend not to interfere with the existing governments of African countries in which they invest. Davis feels that this is bad; he'd rather use American commerce to bring about political changes in African countries so that they can develop in a democratic capitalist direction. Though Davis' company seems to be involved with restaurants and not petroleum, he may be onto something when he says, "The experience of China may resonate with African leaders" because of the way China has achieved massive growth without loss of power by the ruling Communist Party. Further "What China offers may also resonate: Instead of the conditionalities of aid provided by the Bretton Woods organizations [the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank] and Western governments influenced by NGOs and public opinion, China offers a market-oriented relationship with willing buyers who explicitly eschew conditionality."

In plain English, burgeoning trade with China may be seen by Africans as meeting economic needs without political interference under the pretext of "humanitarian intervention" or not. And China buys lots of African oil

#295 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 05:35 PM

Anyone that actually believes the motive is human rights in Libya is beyond hope. This military action is right in plain view of resources, military strategic locale and classic destabilizing. We are such a bunch of suckers.

I'm really pissed to know my tax dollars are supporting this "effort". I hope Obrahma chokes on a dick and dies violently for being exactly what he campaigned against just a short 2-3 years ago. :plain:

#296 vic

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 05:44 PM

seems the obama royal guard of supporters on this board is silent:coffee:

#297 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 05:46 PM

The truth hurts. Usually best to look away when captain obvious shows up and makes fantasy land out of realities. :plain:

I'm moving to Belize. :lol:

#298 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 07:54 PM

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#299 Joker

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Posted 29 March 2011 - 09:29 PM

TASB, they can't be al qaeda, just look at the way they're dressed? :rolleyes:



Libyan rebels: 'We're not al-Qaeda'
By Clare Morgana Gillis, Special for USA TODAY

BENGHAZI, Libya — Until three weeks ago, Gabail Hamad was an engineer for Libya Air.

"Look at me, I'm dressed like an imam," said Hamad, 45, who was wearing a long robe and a white lace prayer hat called a taqiyah.

Hamad stood amid dozens of 5-inch artillery shells in Brega, where he was fighting for the rebels seeking to overthrow Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

"I'm an engineer, a civilized person, an educated person," Hamad said. "I lived in Switzerland for 10 years. I'm a revolutionary, not al-Qaeda, not Taliban.

"Gadhafi, bin Laden, Hitler: all the same."


Cont...
http://www.usatoday....yans30_ST_N.htm

#300 HABIT

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Posted 30 March 2011 - 04:36 PM

the rebels don't impress me much, letting them try and topple Gadhafi could take forever, and arming them well we saw how that went with Afghanastan...I see no chance in Libya either way you look at it...