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USA's Liberation of Libya has begun.


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#201 Deadshow Dan

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 01:52 PM

"flat out broke?"

I think that is an understatement. We've already surpassed flat out broke....

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#202 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 01:56 PM

Cool, the big white empty box.

#203 Joker

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:01 PM

[B]Obama

#204 Shake Yer Bones

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:01 PM

Cool, the big white empty box.


As empty as the promises from politicians.

#205 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:04 PM

Exactly. On either side of the aisle.

#206 Shake Yer Bones

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:08 PM

Agreed. Why anyone thinks Republicans or Democrats are capable of fixing anything is beyond me. They've been working this system or decades and it only gets worse. What's that Einstein said about doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results? It had something to do with going insane.

#207 Joker

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:09 PM

Cool, the big white empty box.


It's a Rachael Maddow attack piece about Wisconsin and evil Republicans giving tax cuts to business. Hell, she must mention "Republican" about 50 times :lol:

#208 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:11 PM

It's a Rachael Maddow attack piece about Wisconsin and evil Republicans giving tax cuts to business. Hell, she must mention "Republican" about 50 times :lol:


Oh, one of those. I should have guessed. :funny1:

#209 Deadshow Dan

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:20 PM

It's a piece by Rachel Maddow on how the claims that it's all about the budget are clearly deceptive when they find plenty of cash their mistresses, family members and political cronies.

#210 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:24 PM

Republicans and Democrats alike have no issue funding their lobbyist cronies, families and mistresses. The budget isnt going to be repaired because same team. 100 million on tomahawk missles doesn't help either.

Thanks mr. president! :rolleyes:

#211 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:41 PM

http://www.atimes.co...t/MC25Ak01.html

Without cutting through the fog of war it's impossible to understand what's really going on in Libya.

Odyssey Dawn is only happening because the 22-member Arab League voted to impose a no-fly zone over Libya. The Arab League - routinely dismissed in Western capitals as irrelevant before this decision - is little else than an instrument of the House of Saud's foreign policy.

Its "decision" was propelled by Washington's promise to protect


the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) kings/sheikhs/oligarchs from the democratic aspirations of their own subjects - who are yearning for the same democratic rights as their "cousins" in eastern Libya.

This is exactly the same GCC, posing for Saudi Arabia that invaded Bahrain to help the Sunni al-Khalifa dynasty to crush the pro-democracy movement. The GCC gang is considered by the West as "our" bastards, while Colonel Muammar Gaddafi - according to the Western narrative - is a terrorist who went to rehab and is now a thug.

The GCC comprises stalwart egalitarians Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). It was the GCC that first voted for a no-fly zone; then top dog Saudi Arabia twisted arms/promised bribes to extract an Arab League endorsement (Syria and Algeria, for instance, were seriously against it).

For the opportunist Arab League secretary-general Amr Moussa, who is already running for the presidency of Egypt, this was a great deal; he took his marching orders from Riyadh while at the same time polishing his CV with Washington.

For Saudi Arabia this was a great deal; the perfect chance for King Abdullah to get rid of Gaddafi (the bad blood between both since 2002 is legendary), and the perfect chance for the House of Saud to lend a hand to a bewildered Washington.

Odyssey Dawn has no inbuilt endgame. US President Barack Obama has made it clear numerous times that his endgame means "Gaddafi must go". This is called "regime change". Or, in the new two-pronged Obama doctrine, "US outreach" (directed towards opponents of "evil regimes"). Not-so-evil regimes, as in Bahrain or Yemen, are encouraged towards "regime alteration".

The problem is "regime change" is not mandated by UN Resolution 1973.

Odyssey Dawn is the first African war of the latest Pentagon overseas military command, Africom. Soon it will turn into the first African war of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Although sold as a "limited mission", Odyssey Dawn - as in just imposing and maintaining a no-fly zone - will cost at least $15 billion a year. Members of the Arab League are supposed to be footing a substantial part of the bill - since the only one to have committed military forces is Qatar (two Mirage fighters).

The whole ongoing circus revolves around how to "transition" the war from the Pentagon in Africa - which is based in Stuttgart, Germany, because none among 53 African countries wanted it - to the Pentagon in Europe, also known as NATO.

NATO already interfered in Somalia in 2010 - airlifting thousands of Ugandan troops. It is now conducting operation Ocean Shield off the Horn of Africa. And before Odyssey Dawn had already placed Libya under 24-hour surveillance by its AWACS planes - part of the nearly 10-year-old Operation Active Endeavor.

In the big picture, the combined role of the Pentagon global tentacles falls under the Full Spectrum Dominance doctrine, which aims to prevent any developing nation, or group of nations, from establishing alliances or preferential relationships with both China and Russia.

China and Russia are among the top four BRIC countries, along with Brazil and India. All four abstained from the UN vote. Only 48 hours before the rushed-in vote, Muammar Gaddafi had threatened that if attacked by the West he would transfer Libya's juicy energy contracts to companies from Russia, India and China.

War by committee
The Libyan opposition is a motley crew of disaffected tribes, the well-meaning youth movement, civilian and military defectors from the Gaddafi regime, Central Intelligence Agency-sponsored assets (such as sinister former justice minister Mustafa Abdel-Jalil), Muslim Brotherhood-related (and unrelated) Islamists, and monarchist Senussi tribesmen. The Senussi is the top tribe in the Benghazi area; most of the keffiah-and-Kalashnikov "rebels" are Senussi, as was King Idris, overthrown by Gaddafi in 1969.

The Libyan transitional council now calls itself an "interim government" - although still committed, in its own words, to a unified Libya. But partition cannot be ruled out - because historically Cyrenaica has always been at odds with Tripolitania. If Gaddafi can muster majority tribal support, the regime won't crumble.

All eyes will be on a "green march" now announced by the one million-strong al-Warfalla tribe, Libya's largest; they had defected to the opposition but now are eager to show their loyalty to Gaddafi.

There's no guarantee the February 17 Movement, the political force at the forefront of the Libyan revolt, with a democratic platform for human rights, a state of law and free and fair elections, will have the upper-hand in a post-Gaddafi environment.

The West will privilege a leadership speaking English, and cozy with Washington and European capitals. Preferably a pliable puppet. Oil may corrupt the new leadership to the core. Add to it the spicy bit of news of al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) - arguably yet one more CIA front - with its maximum of 800 jihadis, already supporting the "rebels". No wonder Armageddon scenarios swirl - the fall of Gaddafi having the potential to produce another Afghanistan or another Iraq.

The agreement reached by Obama, UK Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Nicolas Sarkozy is that NATO will play "a key role" in Odyssey Dawn. Translation; for all practical purposes NATO will be in charge. The political leadership will fall to a "steering committee" of foreign ministers - an Anglo-French-American club with a sprinkling of Arab League. They are supposed to meet soon in Brussels, London or Paris.

Obama phoned Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and apparently convinced him about the arrangement - although in a speech to his ruling Justice and Development Party Erdogan said that Turkey "will never point a gun at the Libyan people".

French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe said that since not all members of the military coalition are members of NATO "this is therefore not a NATO operation". Make no mistake; it is.

This "now you NATO, now you don't" war is roughly what Sarkozy wanted - a "heroic" platform to save his re-election in 2012. But the West's motivation, above all, tastes like oil. Since Saudi Arabia is not on the market, Libya is a spectacular piece of real estate for the energy-hungry West; a giant gas station in the desert with very few people around.

The bulk of Libya's proven oil and gas reserves lie in "rebel" Cyrenaica. Oil and gas account for 25% of the economy, 97% of exports and 90% of government revenue. Sarkozy - as well as the West - fear a protracted war. France wants it to end now. Unlike Germany, Britain and Italy - they're already in - France is salivating to get a huge piece of the oil action.

There's absolutely nothing humanitarian about the current casino inside the EU and NATO. The only thing that matters is the right positioning towards the post-Gaddafi era - the energy bonanza, geostrategic primacy in the Mediterranean and the Sahara-Sahel space, juicy business "reconstruction" opportunities.

Regime change or balkanization?
So Western moral uprightness may be summed up like this. If you sell us a lot of oil, buy our weapons, and smash al-Qaeda, that's fine with us. You may even kill your own people, provided it's just dozens, not thousands.

That's how Saudi Arabia can get away with anything in the current counter-revolution climate, with the House of Saud pulling all stops to crush any measure of democratic aspirations in the Persian Gulf.

As for those regimes that kill perhaps thousands of their own people - and have oil, and threaten to sell the oil to the Russians or the Chinese, their destiny is to fight a UN/Tomahawk resolution.

The forces of counter-revolution are now joined at the hip with the West. Saudi Arabia's military will remain inside Bahrain. The GCC legitimizes the Western war in Libya. The favorite Western endgame in Libya is divide and rule, and roll with the oil. Is the great 2011 Arab revolt about to crash-land in the desert sands?

Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving into Liquid War (Nimble Books, 2007) and Red Zone Blues: a snapshot of Baghdad during the surge. His new book, just out, is Obama does Globalistan (Nimble Books, 2009

#212 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 02:48 PM

This is the most insightful piece on "why" I've seen to date. World War 3 anyone? :huh:

#213 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 03:26 PM

http://english.peopl...43/7330452.html

Many people hold that the ongoing political turmoil in Middle East is occurring because authoritarian governments pushed people to the point of revolt. Is that really the case? The answer lies in the constantly changing attitudes of some Western countries.

The Western coalition, led by the United States, United Kingdom and France, jointly launched military assaults against Libya on March 19 under the pretext of the deteriorating situation, escalating violence and massive civilian casualties.

Elsewhere in Bahrain, where the conditions contrasted sharply with the situation Libya, the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) announced on March 14 to offer military support to the Bahrain government. One day later, Bahrain declared a state of emergency and used force against those staging protests in Pearl Square. Over the past week, 15 protestors were killed and dozens were missing. The situation is as grave as what is happening in Libya given the fact Bahrain is merely a small country with a population of 600,000.

Western countries usually turn a blind eye to what has been going on in Bahrain. When asked about the heavy military presence in Libya while Bahrain is being ignored, a U.S. national security expert noted that the ruling classes of these countries were with the United States, though they were not exactly good. While another scholar with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) said that the double standard did exist, but it was a rational act.

Such straightforward statements still did not reveal the real intentions of the United States. As a matter of fact, Gaddafi has been cooperative with the United States in recent years since 2003, when he gave up the nuclear program at the behest of the United States. He also joined the U.S.-led war on terror and compensated 1.5 billion U.S. dollars to the United States for past terrorist acts, including the bombing of Pan Am flight 103.

The two countries restored full diplomatic relations in 2006, and the United States supported Libya's bid join the nonpermanent members of the U.N. Security Council. Libya once became a good partner in all kinds of U.S.-initiated cooperation, but that did not spare the North Africa nation the tragic lot of being a target of Western coalition. Why? The United States wanted to change, and Gaddafi did not keep up with its pace.

The United States implemented a triple-standard measure to make full use of the changing Middle East situation and consolidate its own strategic goal. For the pro-America republics, such as Egypt, the United States hoped the authorities would answer the people's call to end Mubarak's long-time rule. For the pro-America monarchies, the United States needed to maintain the status quo because of oil interests and the potentially volatile situation in Iran. In those anti-U.S. countries, such as Iran and Syria, the United States would definitely agitate anti-government protests to trigger change.

The United States launched a propaganda campaign. the Persian service of Voice and America (VOA), "Tomorrow Radio" and "Free Radio" have done whatever they can to advocate mass protests in Iran. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton literally sits on the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), which oversees all these anti-Iran Persian radio programs. In the similar case, British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) also started their campaign with Persian-language programs.
Bahrain is a country that the United States cannot afford to target because it is crucial to forging an alliance with Saudi Arabia and attacking Iran. If no substantial changes happened in Bahrain, the United States' posture of supporting democracy is merely a pretext to act in its own interests.



/thread.

#214 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 03:57 PM

http://www.presstv.i...ail/171378.html

'US not in control of its foreign policy'

Concerns continue to grow about the US double standards in its foreign policy highlighted by its inconsistent approaches towards Egypt, Bahrain, Libya, and Yemen.


Press TV talks with Jeff Gates, Attorney and author of Guilt by Association in Phoenix about the total unraveling of US foreign policy as a result of its perceived commitment responsibilities to the aggressions of Israel in the Middle East.

Press TV: President Saleh of Yemen has warned of a civil war. Some observers say this remark is addressed to the West with Saleh saying that his departure would result in a failed state. What is your take on this?

Gates: I am suspicious and it's hard to be supportive of an autocratic regime so you want to support forces that are trying to remove those off the stage. At the same time you recall the British Minister, Lord Cromer used to say,

#215 Joker

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 04:12 PM

Careful there son, mentioning THAT country is a sure way to get this thread moved :wink:

#216 vic

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 06:05 PM

<iframe title="YouTube video player" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/cPmOEpcLZhg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

#217 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 06:06 PM

I didnt mention them. Attorney Jeff Gates did. However, I think the information is relevant to understanding the political and diplomatic turmoil in why the US (and other nations) would choose the "strategic motion" that they have over Libya.

EDIT TO ADD: Also where this entire thing is heading. By the sounds o fit, we're looking for a way to wage a backed war on Iran (Saudi). But make no mistake. The entire interest in the middle east from every angle is energy.

#218 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 07:34 PM

http://www.rttnews.c...Id=1582972&SM=1

French Warplanes Shoot Down Libyan Aircraft - Reports
RTTNews) - French warplanes have shot down a Libyan plane as air strikes by Western coalition entered the sixth day on Thursday, reports quoting U.S. and French military officials said.

French fighter jets shot down a Galeb single-engine military aircraft on Thursday over the western city of Misrata, which has been pounced by forces loyal to embattled leader Moammar Qadhafi in the past few days, reports said.

However, spokesman for the French armed forces refused to confirm the report.

It was the first incident of its kind since American, British and French forces began joint air strikes on Saturday to enforce a U.N.-mandated no-fly zone over strife-torn Libya.

A UNSC resolution, passed last Thursday, decided to impose a no-fly zone over Libya to protect the civilians from aerial bombings and authorized any military action needed to implement such a ban, short of an occupation

#219 vic

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 07:37 PM

http://www.reuters.c...E72N5SV20110324

Libya says almost 100 civilians died in air strikes
Mon, Mar 21 2011
TRIPOLI | Thu Mar 24, 2011 2:08pm EDT

TRIPOLI (Reuters) - Libya said Thursday the civilian death toll from five days of coalition air strikes had reached almost 100 and accused Western governments of fighting on the side of the rebels.

Mussa Ibrahim, a government spokesman, also said the Libyan government believed Western forces were planning to attack its broadcasting infrastructure, possibly later Thursday.

"What is happening now is that Western governments are fighting on the side of the rebels. This was not permitted by the United Nations resolution," he told reporters.

"We have received intelligence that our broadcasting and communications infrastructure will be targeted, possibly tonight, by the air strikes. ... This would, if this takes place, be very immoral and illegal. These are civilian targets."

He said the civilian death toll from allied air strikes was "getting close to 100." Western military officials deny any civilians have been killed in its campaign to enforce a no-fly zone over Libya to protect civilians from government forces.

#220 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 07:39 PM

The most frightening part is that our govt and military arent even remotely concerned with the image it is currently giving itself. When they no longer even hide their atrocious crimes, that really worries me.....

#221 vic

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 07:57 PM

The most frightening part is that our govt and military arent even remotely concerned with the image it is currently giving itself. When they no longer even hide their atrocious crimes, that really worries me.....



israel's been doing this for years

#222 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 08:06 PM

Shhh.....

#223 vic

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 08:15 PM

i hate your new avatar

#224 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 08:15 PM

:lol:

#225 vic

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 08:40 PM

http://www.alternet....ing_them_bombs/
TAKE ACTIONPetitions by Change.org|Get Widget|Start a Petition � When all you have is bombs, everything starts to look like a target. And so after years of providing Libya’s dictator with the weapons he's been using against the people, all the international community – France, Britain and the United States – has to offer the people of Libya is more bombs, this time dropped from the sky rather than delivered in a box to Muammar Gaddafi's palace.

If the bitter lesson of Iraq and Afghanistan has taught us anything, though, it's that wars of liberation exact a deadly toll on those they purportedly liberate – and that democracy doesn't come on the back of a Tomahawk missile.



President Barack Obama announced his latest peace-through-bombs initiative last week -- joining ongoing U.S. conflicts and proxy wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia -- by declaring he could not “stand idly by when a tyrant tells his people that there will be no mercy, and ... where innocent men and women face brutality and death at the hands of their own government.”



Within 24 hours of the announcement, more than 110 U.S. Tomahawk cruise missiles were fired into Libya, including the capital Tripoli, reportedly killing dozens of innocent civilians -- as missiles, even the “smart” kind, are wont to do. According to the New York Times, allied warplanes with “brutal efficiency” bombed “tanks, missile launches and civilian cars, leaving a smoldering trail of wreckage that stretched for miles.”



“[M]any of the tanks seemed to have been retreating,” the paper reported. That’s the reality of the no-fly zone and the mission creep that started the moment it was enacted: bombing civilians and massacring retreating troops. And like any other war, it's not pretty.



While much of the media presents an unquestioning, sanitized version of the war -- cable news hosts more focused on interviewing retired generals about America’s fancy killing machines than the actual, bloody facts on the ground -- the truth is that wars, even liberal-minded “humanitarian” ones, entail destroying people and places. Though cloaked in altruism that would be more believable were we dealing with monasteries, not nation-states, the war in Libya is no different. And innocents pay the price.


If protecting civilians from evil dictators was the goal, though -- as opposed to, say, safeguarding natural resources and the investments of major oil companies -- there’s an easier, safer way than aerial bombardment for the U.S. and its allies to consider: simply stop arming and propping up evil dictators. After all, Libya's Muammar Gaddafi reaped the benefits from Western nations all too eager to cozy up to and rehabilitate the image of a dictator with oil, with those denouncing him today as a murderous tyrant just a matter of weeks ago selling him the very arms his regime has been using to suppress the rebellion against it.



In 2009 alone, European governments -- including Britain and France -- sold Libya more than $470 million worth of weapons, including fighter jets, guns and bombs. And before it started calling for regime change, the Obama administration was working to provide the Libyan dictator another $77 million in weapons, on top of the $17 million it provided in 2009 and the $46 million the Bush administration provided in 2008.

Meanwhile, for dictatorial regimes in Yemen, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia, U.S. support continues to this day. On Saturday, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton even gave the U.S. stamp of approval to the brutal crackdown on protesters in Bahrain, saying the country’s authoritarian rulers “obviously” had the “sovereign right” to invite troops from Saudi Arabia to occupy their country and carry out human rights abuses, including attacks on injured protesters as they lay in their hospital beds.

#226 Deadshow Dan

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 08:53 PM

allied warplanes

just so you're clear... likely that's France or Britain.

#227 Julius

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 09:43 PM

I got news for you all: this is not our war. It's target practice, especially for the French, who really need the practice.

#228 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 11:39 PM

lolmatters.

#229 Joker

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Posted 24 March 2011 - 11:57 PM

just so you're clear... likely that's France or Britain.

Do you have anything to back this up or are you just spewing shit again without actual facts to back it up?



WASHINGTON, March 24 (Reuters) - The coalition enforcing a no-fly zone over Libya hammered Muammar Gaddafi's military with Tomahawk cruise missiles and air strikes as it pressed its demand for his supporters to stop fighting and halt attacks on civilians, U.S. Vice Admiral Bill Gortney said on Thursday.

Gortney, director of the U.S. military's Joint Staff, said the coalition fired 14 Tomahawk missiles overnight and flew 130 sorties.

In addition to policing the no-fly zone, they targeted an air defense site near Tripoli, a Scud missile battery in the south and Gaddafi's troops maneuvering near Misrata and Ajdabiya, he said.

Forty-nine of the sorties were air strikes against specific targets while the remainder were patrols enforcing the no-fly zone. U.S. aircraft flew roughly half of the total sorties by the 11-member coalition.

Gortney said the campaign included more than 350 aircraft, 38 ships at sea and thousands of military personnel. Non-U.S. planes flew about 75 percent of the no-fly patrol sorties.

"It is fair to say that the coalition is growing in both size and capability every day," he told reporters in a briefing at the Pentagon.

Gortney said the U.S. military was readying to hand control of the operation to another command structure, as promised by President Barack Obama. NATO countries appeared to be moving closer to an agreement on taking command, but the arrangements were still being finalized.


Continued...
http://af.reuters.co...418711820110324

#230 vic

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 01:19 PM

just so you're clear... likely that's France or Britain.


good god...talk about protecting obama at all costs:rolleyes:

#231 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 01:23 PM

loleft aisle

#232 vic

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 01:34 PM

there is no left aisle...or maybe there is and dennis kucinich is sitting there all by his lonesome :lol:

#233 Joker

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 04:29 PM

Obama juggles Libya promises, realities
By the CNN Wire Staff

Washington (CNN) -- The domestic political stakes of America's military intervention in Libya were raised Friday as the Obama administration worked to balance promises of a rapid U.S. transition to a supporting role with an apparent unwillingness among coalition partners to have NATO assume full control of the mission.

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney promised Thursday afternoon that U.S. military forces will be shifting to a "support and assist" role in the international coalition within a matter of days.

The United States is engaged in a "time-limited, scope-limited" action, Carney said.

Hours later, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen announced that NATO members will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone as early as Sunday.
Rasmussen did not say, however, that NATO would assume the lead role in protecting civilians on the ground -- a role that has been mandated by the U.N. Security Council.

Rasmussen also did not say NATO would push to bring about regime change -- a goal beyond the scope of the U.N. mandate. U.S. officials have made clear that they want to see strongman Moammar Gadhafi removed from power.

The announcement raised questions about the prospect of a rapid, seamless transition from an American to a NATO-led operation.

So far, U.S. forces have taken on the bulk of the Libyan mission, according to figures provided by the Pentagon. Of a total of 175 Tomahawk missiles fired, 168 were from the United States and seven from Great Britain, the only two countries to possess them, while U.S. planes have flown almost two-thirds of the sorties and U.S. ships constitute more than two-thirds of the total involved.


Cont...
http://edition.cnn.c...25/obama.libya/

#234 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 04:31 PM

More bullshit from the puppet at the podium.

#235 Deadshow Dan

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 04:37 PM

During the last 24 hours coalition aircraft have carried out 153 sorties, 67 of which by the US Air Force.
Missions targeting Muammar Gaddafi loyalists also included the launch of 16 Tomahawk cruise missiles and of 4 satellite guided bombs. The figures were reported by AFRICOM spokeswoman Nicole Dalrymple. AFRICOM is the US Africa Command based in Berlin. .
http://www.agi.it/en...ies_in_24_hours

#236 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 04:47 PM

Sounds like we did all of the expensive work and left the small detail sorties (like flyovers, etc..) to the French. Either way, this invasion is unjust, unconstitutional and goes against everything the puppet campaigned on. He's a lost cause. Good riddence in 2012, Obrahma and your erect veggie.

#237 Joker

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 05:10 PM

During the last 24 hours coalition aircraft have carried out 153 sorties, 67 of which by the US Air Force.
Missions targeting Muammar Gaddafi loyalists also included the launch of 16 Tomahawk cruise missiles and of 4 satellite guided bombs. The figures were reported by AFRICOM spokeswoman Nicole Dalrymple. AFRICOM is the US Africa Command based in Berlin. .
http://www.agi.it/en...ies_in_24_hours

Damn if only this had happened earlier it would have actually backed up what you said.

Got anything from the 24 hours BEFORE you made the statement?

#238 Deadshow Dan

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 05:16 PM

Heard it on the radio. The report said that most bombing mission were carried out by British and French, except for cruise and satellite guided bombs.

You're welcome to disagree, if you can manage somehow to do so civilly.

#239 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 05:17 PM

http://www.mathaba.net/news/?x=626278

The CIA's Libya Rebels: The Same Terrorists who Killed US, NATO Troops in Iraq

Webster G. Tarpley, Ph.D.
TARPLEY.net
March 24, 2011

Washington DC, March 24, 2011

#240 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 05:17 PM

it is starting to look like my source was right.

#241 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 05:23 PM

Someone was telling me yesterday that Al-Q. is behind the revolts and are sponsored by America directly. I have no cite source, no logic to back it up, but someone is calling the shots here and according to my source, we're about to find out all about it.

Do I believe what i was told? :dunno:


:dunno:

#242 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 05:37 PM

http://www.telegraph...aeda-links.html

Libyan rebel commander admits his fighters have al-Qaeda links


In an interview with the Italian newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore, Mr al-Hasidi admitted that he had recruited "around 25" men from the Derna area in eastern Libya to fight against coalition troops in Iraq. Some of them, he said, are "today are on the front lines in Adjabiya".

Mr al-Hasidi insisted his fighters "are patriots and good Muslims, not terrorists," but added that the "members of al-Qaeda are also good Muslims and are fighting against the invader".

His revelations came even as Idriss Deby Itno, Chad's president, said al-Qaeda had managed to pillage military arsenals in the Libyan rebel zone and acquired arms, "including surface-to-air missiles, which were then smuggled into their sanctuaries".

Mr al-Hasidi admitted he had earlier fought against "the foreign invasion" in Afghanistan, before being "captured in 2002 in Peshwar, in Pakistan". He was later handed over to the US, and then held in Libya before being released in 2008.

click the link to read the rest....

#243 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 06:48 PM

http://tarpley.net/2...lex-jones-show/

Tarpley Speaks on the middle east on Alex Jones.

Click the link to listen to the radio piece. FYI - I am aware Jones is off his rocker. I still listen to him. That doesnt mean I believe everything he says. Highly recommended listening if you're interested in figuring out wtf is going on.

#244 Julius

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 06:52 PM

The real story here: Jack :heart:s Dan. :devil:

#245 Joker

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 06:55 PM

The real story here: Jack :heart:s Dan. :devil:

Jealous much? :rolleyes:

#246 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:07 PM

Obrahma's a coward.

#247 Julius

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:10 PM

The two of you need to re-enact the Brokeback tent scene methinks :lmao:

#248 Phishfolk

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:10 PM

Jealous much? :rolleyes:


Prolly he'll just steal Dan from you.

#249 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:38 PM

:hit:

Take it to L&S. This here is about investigating and updating the thread on the events in the invasion of Libya.

Or as I'm quickly discovering....Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Syria..........

#250 beerzrkr

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 07:42 PM