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The loss of Freedom of Speech / Right to Protest?


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114 replies to this topic

#101 MeOmYo

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 08:42 PM

if it were that simple, we wouldn't be having this discussion.

The assumption is that if a person or group chooses to protest a funeral, they are choosing to be disruptive, and therefore the assembly is NOT peaceful. Therefore, it is not protected by the constitution.

Anyone has the right to say anything they want, but just like anything in life there are certain parameters. You don't have the right to say it anywhere you want.


The discussion is if it should continue to be legal, not if it is legal. If it weren't legal, surely members of a Baptist church wouldn't commit such an act, at least without being arrested for their illegal actions.

#102 Tooozday

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 08:49 PM

Is being able to protest at a funeral really a right worth fighting over?


Well, I think it is.

#103 Joker

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 09:02 PM

The discussion is if it should continue to be legal, not if it is legal. If it weren't legal, surely members of a Baptist church wouldn't commit such an act, at least without being arrested for their illegal actions.

You and your damn "facts" :gah:

#104 PeaceFrog

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 03:12 AM

so you both think that they are peacefully protesting?

#105 PeaceFrog

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 03:13 AM

because hateful assembly is not protected by the constitution.

#106 Tim the Beek

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 12:13 PM

Actually, it is.

See National Socialist Party of America et al. v. Village of Skokie.

#107 PeaceFrog

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 07:38 PM

Actually, it is.

See National Socialist Party of America et al. v. Village of Skokie.


That court case does not permit hateful assembly. It permits the use of the swastika during a march.

I'm not a judge or anything... but there seems to be a big difference between hateful assembly and the use of offensive symbols in a peaceful assembly.

The issue here is whether or not a protest should be allowed in close proximity to a burial place during a religious ceremony, and I think it's just common sense and decency to reserve that time and space for those who are grieving, not those who are seeking dissension.

What exactly is being protested that needs to be done right then and there? Why can't they make their point in a more appropriate setting?

#108 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 07:52 PM

National Socialist Party of America et al. v. Village of Skokie comprehension fail.

#109 PeaceFrog

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 08:47 PM

National Socialist Party of America et al. v. Village of Skokie comprehension fail.


you are the biggest hypocrite on this message board because I hadn't been anything other than civil in this discourse, and this is the answer you give me rather than explaining your interpretation.

you're only reiterating what I've observed in the past, and that is that you are not here to educate others. Your attempts to "explain" do nothing other than baffle people with bullshit.

Why not prove me wrong, and explain where I've miscomprehended instead of making your peanut gallery quips of condescension?

#110 TakeAStepBack

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 09:18 PM

With any other member, I would.

#111 PeaceFrog

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 09:27 PM

no offense, but that seems like a very small minded attitude since I'm probably not the only one who interpreted the court case the way in which I did.

#112 Joker

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 10:11 PM

With any other member, I would.

:clapping:

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#113 Java Time

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 10:37 PM

Actually, it is.

See National Socialist Party of America et al. v. Village of Skokie.



is there a site that explains the findings for simpletons (not wikipedia)...I can't understand the legal shit in the cornell site...or any other site I checked using my awesome powers of research :funny1:


to me it looks like the commies had to go to the supreme court to file a stay which I think repeals skokies original injuction of not allowing uniforms ans swat-stickers?


I don't understand the final verdict of this...they won but because of insurance costs they didn't march or marched somewhere else?

Edited by Java Time, 17 August 2012 - 10:54 PM.


#114 Tooozday

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Posted 17 August 2012 - 11:38 PM

I think it's just common sense and decency to reserve that time and space for those who are grieving, not those who are seeking dissension.



And that is a valid point. But common sense is not something that I trust to courts and legislation, and "decency" changes from person to person. Along with others, I think that the protesting group is gross and their message is disgusting. But I support their right to say these distasteful and hurtful things. My views may be distasteful (or lacking in common sense or decency) to others, and I don't wish to be forced into silence.

#115 PeaceFrog

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 12:11 AM

nobody is trying to force you or anyone else into complete silence. it's already a law that you can't protest at a national memorial. this law is a variation of that one. There are certain places that are off limits to protesting... it's just a law regardless of the reason for protest.

As reasonable human beings, I'm confident that we're able to understand and accept these terms without "slipping off the slope."